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working principal of rotary distributor pump

Rhode Island College Anchor Notes - Rhode Island College Athletics

Rhode Island College Anchor Notes The Official Newsletter of Rhode Island College Intercollegiate Athletics www.ric.edu/athletics Vol. VI No. 2 Providence, Rhode Island Fall Review/Winter Preview December, 2004 Michael Morrison Joins RIC Staff Inside this edition Tabbed to head up athletic development Morrison joins RIC staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 1 Soccer stadium project update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 1 2004 fall season summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 2 Upcoming home winter sports dates . . . . . . . . . . Page 3 Dates to remember . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 3 Vin Cullen ‘55 honored. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 3 75th Anniversary events taking place . . . . . . . . . . Page 4 Anchor Club membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 4 Rh ode Island College has n am ed Michael Morrison the Assistant Athletic Director for Athletic Development. He is responsible for the day-to-day management of the department’s development init iativ es in clud ing fun draisin g and marketing activities. “I am very excited about joining the Rh ode Is land College Athletic Michael Morrison Department,” Morrison says. “I am looking forward to working with RIC Athletic Dir ector Don Tencher and Anchor Club Executive Director Art Pontarelli and hope to continue the success that they’ve had over the past five years.” RIC Athletic Direct or Don Tencher says, “W are e extremely glad to have Mike Morrison joining our athletic family. Mike brings successful experience, ener gy, and a strong work ethic to the fundraising side of our house. I am confident that Mike’s efforts will result in positive results that will benefit the athletic program, our student-athletes and our alumni.”

Brake Booster Market - Freescale Semiconductor

PERFOMANCE BOOST The Freescale* MPXV4115V pressure sensor is the ideal part for automotive vacuum sensing needs such as those found in the brake booster application. Prepared by Marc Osajda Automotive Sensor Marketing Motorola – Toulouse, France Advanced braking systems are becoming increasingly common in today’s automobiles. Higher level systems and technology now being used in “brake assist systems” (BAS) in several European cars, have made it possible for more efficient and intelligent braking systems. A key functional application block found in these braking systems that has advanced with this technology surge, is the vacuum brake booster function. Here are a few driving factors behind the need and use of the brake booster, which helps ensure a safer braking system. Independent Systems: In current gasoline engine cars, the engine’s intake manifold generates the vacuum for the brake booster. This system works fine with one exception. The amount of vacuum in the brake booster is unknown by the braking system. Thus the amount of amplification is also unknown. If heavy braking is needed, there is no possibility for the brake system to interact with the intake manifold if additional amplification is required. The manufacturer’s interest for having the vacuum generated by an auxiliary vacuum pump is that the brake system can manage the amount of vacuum as required, on demand. This in turns gives it the ability to perform amplification on its own, giving it complete independent from the engine’s operating condition. The auxiliary pump is also able to provide higher amounts of vacuum whenever necessary. In situations calling for heavy braking, the pressure will naturally decrease in the brake booster, also causing a decrease in the amplification during braking. With an external pump it is possible to maintain, or even increase the amplification during a heavy braking phase. Smart Safety: Wheel blocking due to high-braking force is controlled by the Anti-Lock Brake System (ABS). However, it has been observed that in many cases, drivers do not...

Vacuum Brake Booster Testing and Diagnosis.pdf

Vacuum Brake Booster Testing and Diagnosis Vacuum Brake Booster Testing and Diagnosis This procedure will require the use of a hand operated vacuum pump with a vacuum gauge. If you do not own one it can often be rented or borrowed from most “big box” parts stores. (Note: 18”HG is the minimum engine vacuum at idle in gear to effectively operate a vacuum booster 1) Remove vacuum hose from check valve on booster. Place hose from vacuum pump onto check valve and draw booster to 20” of vacuum. 2) Let booster sit with vacuum applied for 5 minutes. If vacuum does not stay steady at 20” it is faulty and needs to be replaced. If vacuum does hold steady at 20” proceed to step 3. 3) With 20” of vacuum in booster depress brake pedal once and release it. The booster should transfer some but not the entire vacuum in reserve. Depending on how hard the pedal is depressed it is normal to see 5-10” of vacuum depleted from reserve. The most important thing is to ensure the booster does transfer vacuum but does NOT transfer the entire vacuum in its reserve. If vacuum remains at 20” OR goes to zero the booster is bad and will need to be replaced. If vacuum transfer is within the above parameter proceed to step 4. 4) Once again draw booster down to 20” of vacuum. Go inside car and depress brake pedal and hold down for 30 seconds. You should see the gauge drop slightly and then hold steady. Vacuum should stay steady as long as you are holding the pedal down. If vacuum drops while pedal is being held down the booster is faulty and will need to be replaced.

BPI 10-06 Temporary reduction in power brake ... - Raybestos Brakes

No. BPI 10-06 Subject: Temporary reduction in power brake assist in extreme cold weather Vehicles Involved: Models: 2009 BUICK ENCLAVE 2009 CHEVROLET TRAVERSE 2009 GMC ACADIA 2009 SATURN OUTLOOK From 9J100008 From 9S100002 From 9J100016 From 9J100003 to to to to 9J190898 9S143268 9J190899 9J190888 Condition: If the brake check valves are NOT installed correctly, an increased amount of brake pedal effort will be required to obtain brake function, and the brake assist system will NOT perform as designed. Repair: Replace the first design brake booster vacuum hose check valve (1) with a second design brake booster vacuum hose check valve (2). An arrow on the second design check valve indicates the vacuum draw direction (3). 1. Remove the fuel injector sight shield (engine cover) from the engine. 4400 Prime Parkway McHenry, IL 60050  (815) 363-9000 Determine where the two brake booster vacuum hose check valves are located. Refer to callouts 1 and 2 in the illustration 2. Release the quick connect (4) from the power brake booster auxiliary pump (3). 3. Remove the protective wrap (5) from the brake booster vacuum hose to locate check valve # (1). 4400 Prime Parkway McHenry, IL 60050  (815) 363-9000 4. Remove the check valve (1) from the brake booster vacuum hose that routes to the power brake booster auxiliary pump (3). 5. Remove the check valve (2) from the brake booster hose that routes to the intake manifold vacuum port (6). Note If necessary, a small amount of denatured alcohol can be used as an assembly aid for installing the vacuum hose to the manifold vacuum port. Do not use soap. 6. Install a new check valve (1) to the brake booster hose that routes to the power brake booster auxiliary pump (3). Ensure the arrow on the check valve (1) ...

The ATE T50 Brake Booster - 190SL | 190 SL

Fifty percent less pedal force I n most of the models of the 1950s and 1960s, Mercedes-Benz provided a power brake booster manufactured by ATE. The booster does not pro- vide additional braking capacity, a common misconception, but rather reduces the pedal force required for braking. The power brake is a vacuum-assisted hydraulic component using the pressure difference between engine intake manifold vacuum and atmospheric pressure for its operation. The power unit increases the pressure created physically in the brake master cylinder so that the same braking effect can be produced with less pedal effort. With a brake booster installed, the pedal force required for braking is reduced by 50 percent. The ATE T50 Brake Booster uses vacuum to “boost” the hydraulic brakeline pressure. The booster contains a hydraulic cylinder, a large vacuum piston that presses against the hydraulic cylinder, and a control circuit that regulates the vacuum flow based on brake-line pressures. This technology had been well proven since the early 1900s, and the T50 has been exceptionally reliable over many years of use. The Booster in action The power booster is a very simple design requiring only a vacuum source to operate. In gasoline-engine cars, the engine provides a vacuum suitable for the boosters. Because diesel engines do not produce a vacuum, dieselpowered vehicles must use a separate vacuum pump. A vacuum hose from the intake manifold on the engine pulls air from both sides of the diaphragm when the engine is running. When the driver steps on the brake pedal, the input rod assembly in the booster moves forward, blocking off the vacuum port to the backside of the diaphragm and opening an atmospheric port that allows air to enter the back chamber. Suddenly, the diaphragm has vacuum pulling against one side and air pressure pushing on the other. The result is forward pressure that assists in pushing the input rod, which in turn pushes the piston in the master cylinder. The amount of power assist that’s provided by the booster depends on the size of the diaphragm and the amount of intake manifold vacuum produced by the engine. A larger diaphragm will increase the boost.

Your Webinar Will Begin Shortly - Motor Coach Industries

Welcome to the MCILEARN Series Your Webinar Will Begin Shortly Today’s Topic Shake Out: Vibration Analysis If you do not have an audio connection, dial 877-739-5904 and enter the Audio PIN number given to you on your screen © 2012 Motor Coach Industries Int'l, Inc. and its subsidiaries. All Rights Reserved. Learning Objectives • Identify the different classifications of vehicle driveline vibrations • Begin to diagnose & locate the source of a vehicle driveline vibration • Provide a correction to eliminate the vibration from the vehicle © 2012 Motor Coach Industries Int'l, Inc. and its subsidiaries. All Rights Reserved. Safety Message • Always use personal protection devices – Safety glasses, ear protection, etc • Always observe all safety precautions listed in the Maintenance Manual including but not limited to: – – – – – – Ensure coach is on a level surface Ensure parking brake is applied Chock wheels Always use jack stands Shut off batteries Utilize Lock Out/Tag Out procedures © 2012 Motor Coach Industries Int'l, Inc. and its subsidiaries. All Rights Reserved. Vibration Identification: Identifying the Source of a Vibration © 2012 Motor Coach Industries Int'l, Inc. and its subsidiaries. All Rights Reserved. Vibration Analysis Primary sources of vibrations • Tires & Wheels – Rims, tires, hub & drum assemblies • Driveline – Driveshaft & slip-joint, u-joints, yokes & flanges – Working angle of driveshaft • Engine & Transmission – Crankshaft, injectors & cylinders, vibration dampers, engine supports, exhaust...

Drive Line / Universal
by Maradoni 0 Comments favorite 3 Viewed Download 0 Times

– Drivelines and Universal Joints Universal Joint Maintenance • Most factory-installed universal joints are sealed and don’t require periodic lubrication • After-market replacement joints are equipped with a grease fitting and must be greased periodically Drive Shaft Problem Diagnosis • Road testing – Vehicle should be driven while accelerating and decelerating as well as at various steady speeds – Vibrations caused by worn U-joints usually occur while accelerating Types and Causes of Vibrations • High speed vibrations – Usually caused by driveshaft imbalance • Vibrations during acceleration – Usually caused by worn double Cardan joint ball and socket • Low speed vibrations – Usually caused by improper operating angles Noise Diagnosis • Clunking noise while accelerating from a dead stop – Usually caused by worn or damaged U-joint – Can be caused by problems including excessive clearance between slip joint and extension housing • Squeaking noise – Often caused by worn or poorly lubricated U-joint Reasons for Universal Joint Failure • Lack of lubrication • Pushing another car • Towing a trailer • Changing gears abruptly • Carrying heavy loads Steps in Lubricating U-Joints 1. Wipe off the nozzle of the fitting 2. Attach the hose of the grease gun to the fitting 3. Pump grease slowly into the fitting 4. Stop pumping when grease appears at the bearing cups Inspecting the Drive Shaft • Check for fluid leaks • Check the U-joints for signs of rust or leakage • Check for movement in the joint while trying to turn the yoke and the shaft in opposite directions • Check the drive shaft for dents, missing weights, and undercoating or dirt...

How to Diagnose Vibrations
by Maradoni 0 Comments favorite 2 Viewed Download 0 Times

Vibration Diagnostics S tart 1 Gather Info When did vibration start? Where is vibration felt? What road conditions? Under load or high torque conditions? During acceleration/deceleration? Speed dependent? RPM dependent? Noise? Suspension modified recently? Lube clean and at proper level? 2 Important: Use factory service manuals and procedures and refer to all applicable safety precautions when servicing vehicles. This document is intended to assist with drivetrain vibration diagnosis. It does not guarantee an immediate solution nor does it guarantee warranty responsibility or reimbursement. Refer to Roadranger.com for Product Warranty Statements, Warranty Manual, and Warranty Guidelines. 6 Vibrations While Stationary Previous work on clutch or engine Y es In the road test in Step 2, the vehicle was run up to the suspected RPM and the transmission shift lever was placed in neutral. No Y es No If clutch work recently done, problem could be related to the clutch. Verify proper clutch was installed. If engine work recently done, problem could be related to the engine. Contact your engine distributor. 4 No Problem is related to the clutch. Road Test Have vehicle driver recreate complaint condition, if possible Leave trailer attached Run up to suspected RPM and put transmission in neutral Simulate Conditions Speed Related? Y es Does ride height meet OEM specs Y es No No Perform visual inspection and use Eaton Driveline Angle Analyzer (DAA). U-joint bearing cups and trunnions Bearing straps Flange yoke / companion flange Yoke-mounted damper Parking brake Center bearing Fasteners Driveshaft for damage / missing weights Driveshaft slip spline (wear / bottoming / inadequate engagement) Cab mounts / air ride system Correct per OEM procedures. Speed RPM Gear Position Coast Under power Loaded / Unloaded Problem Solved No Remove all drive axle shafts and lock in power divider. Run truck in same condition as when complaint occurred. Y es Done! Problem Solved Isolate Suspect Shaft No Y es Problem is related to the wheel end. Take known good wheel assembly and test replacement from wheel to wheel to isolate problem.

Mole Mapping and screening in the GP Dublin

Dr. Steve Karagiannis has interest in the mole mapping and Screening in his own Skin Check clinic. He is working for the general practice for the melanoma in the Dublin.

Coflexip® - Flexible Steel Pipe for Drilling and Service ... - Technip

DESCRIPTION OF A COFLEXIP® FLEXIBLE LINE The Coflexip® Flexible Line Coflexip® products are designed for oilfield services, both on and offshore, where heavy duty is required in combination with Flexible lines are manufactured in long continuous sections (up to several kilometres) and are cut to fit each client's requirements. End fittings with the most common types of end connectors are kept in stock thus minimising delivery times. End connectors not kept in stock will be machined or obtained according to the client's specifications. Delivery time depends mainly on the type of end connectors required and our client’s particular specifications. The pipe structure Coflexip® pipes are composed of successive layers of steel and thermoplastic to produce unique structures that have the strength and durability of steel pipes combined with the flexibility of reinforced rubber hoses. Each layer works independently from the others, as no vulcanisation is used during manufacturing. This results in the structural stability of the pipe. flexibility and Functions of Coflexip® pipe components reliability. These requirements are in applications such as: Choke and kill lines Rotary and vibrator lines Test lines Hydraulic lines Acid and cement lines Nitrogen lines Coflexip® flexible pipes for drilling and service applications are manufactured by the Drilling & Refining Applications Division of the Technip Group 2 1. The thermoplastic inner tube makes the pipe leak-tight. 2. The interlocked zeta and flat steel spiral pressure carcass resist internal pressure and external crushing loads. 3. The intermediate thermoplastic sheath is an anti-friction layer. 4. The double crosswound steel armours resist axial loads, protect the pipe from torsional strain resulting from handling and working conditions. 5. The thermoplastic outer jacket protects the armours from external corrosion. 6. The Stainless Steel Outer Wrap (SSOW), protects the pipe from mechanical impact, abrasion, weathering and accidental mishandling.

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