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weldon fuel pump overhal manual

Manual BSH Belt Grinding Machines - Scantool Group

KEF-MOTOR A/S Industrivej 3-9 DK 9460 Brovst Denmark Tel. +45 9823 6266 Fax. +45 9823 6144 Manual BSH Belt Grinding Machines 20-75 22-75 25-75 20-100 20-150 25-100 25-150 EU declaration of conformity KEF-MOTOR A/S Industrivej 3-9 DK-9460 Brovst Denmark www.scantool-group.com Tel.: +45 98 23 62 66 Fax: +45 98 23 61 44 hereby declares that BSH Belt Grinding Machine are manufactured in accordance with the provisions of the COUNCIL DIRECTIVE of 17. May 2006 (2006/42/EC) – The Machinery Directive (order no. 561 of 25 June 1994 with subsequent amendments) Also on accordance with: · The council directive of 19 February 1973 (73/23/EEC) – The Low Voltage Directive – with later amendments (order no. 797 of 30 August 1994) · The council directive of 3 May 1989 (89/336/EEC) – The EMC Directive – with later amendments (order no. 796 of 5 December 1991 with subsequent amendments).

Grinding Machine Operator (PDF) - Micro 100

Grinding Machine Operator Application available online at www.micro100.com Select Careers tab FAX Application or Resume: 955-1314 Job Description: Operate manual grinding machines in the manufacture of carbide cutting tools. Must be able to read and understand blueprints. Prior experience using calipers, micrometers, or other measuring equipment is preferred. Good math and mechanical skills a plus. Shifts Available for Hire: Night Shift—5% Shift Premium Monday-Wednesday from 5pm - 5am, and Thursday from 4pm - 9:30pm. Weekend Shift—7 ½% Shift Premium Thursday 10:30am—4pm, Friday-Sunday 5am – 5pm Physical requirements of the job: Long periods of standing and walking; ability to lift up to 50 lbs. Benefits Available after 60 days: Medical, Dental, Vision, Life, Disability Insurance; 401k— 1yr., vacation, holiday, & personal Minimum Exp: 6 months to 1 YR Preferred Minimum Education: GED Hours Per Week: 40 Shifts: Night & Weekend Shift Salary: DOE Job License: No...

Brake Booster Market - Freescale Semiconductor

PERFOMANCE BOOST The Freescale* MPXV4115V pressure sensor is the ideal part for automotive vacuum sensing needs such as those found in the brake booster application. Prepared by Marc Osajda Automotive Sensor Marketing Motorola – Toulouse, France Advanced braking systems are becoming increasingly common in today’s automobiles. Higher level systems and technology now being used in “brake assist systems” (BAS) in several European cars, have made it possible for more efficient and intelligent braking systems. A key functional application block found in these braking systems that has advanced with this technology surge, is the vacuum brake booster function. Here are a few driving factors behind the need and use of the brake booster, which helps ensure a safer braking system. Independent Systems: In current gasoline engine cars, the engine’s intake manifold generates the vacuum for the brake booster. This system works fine with one exception. The amount of vacuum in the brake booster is unknown by the braking system. Thus the amount of amplification is also unknown. If heavy braking is needed, there is no possibility for the brake system to interact with the intake manifold if additional amplification is required. The manufacturer’s interest for having the vacuum generated by an auxiliary vacuum pump is that the brake system can manage the amount of vacuum as required, on demand. This in turns gives it the ability to perform amplification on its own, giving it complete independent from the engine’s operating condition. The auxiliary pump is also able to provide higher amounts of vacuum whenever necessary. In situations calling for heavy braking, the pressure will naturally decrease in the brake booster, also causing a decrease in the amplification during braking. With an external pump it is possible to maintain, or even increase the amplification during a heavy braking phase. Smart Safety: Wheel blocking due to high-braking force is controlled by the Anti-Lock Brake System (ABS). However, it has been observed that in many cases, drivers do not...

Vacuum Brake Booster Testing and Diagnosis.pdf

Vacuum Brake Booster Testing and Diagnosis Vacuum Brake Booster Testing and Diagnosis This procedure will require the use of a hand operated vacuum pump with a vacuum gauge. If you do not own one it can often be rented or borrowed from most “big box” parts stores. (Note: 18”HG is the minimum engine vacuum at idle in gear to effectively operate a vacuum booster 1) Remove vacuum hose from check valve on booster. Place hose from vacuum pump onto check valve and draw booster to 20” of vacuum. 2) Let booster sit with vacuum applied for 5 minutes. If vacuum does not stay steady at 20” it is faulty and needs to be replaced. If vacuum does hold steady at 20” proceed to step 3. 3) With 20” of vacuum in booster depress brake pedal once and release it. The booster should transfer some but not the entire vacuum in reserve. Depending on how hard the pedal is depressed it is normal to see 5-10” of vacuum depleted from reserve. The most important thing is to ensure the booster does transfer vacuum but does NOT transfer the entire vacuum in its reserve. If vacuum remains at 20” OR goes to zero the booster is bad and will need to be replaced. If vacuum transfer is within the above parameter proceed to step 4. 4) Once again draw booster down to 20” of vacuum. Go inside car and depress brake pedal and hold down for 30 seconds. You should see the gauge drop slightly and then hold steady. Vacuum should stay steady as long as you are holding the pedal down. If vacuum drops while pedal is being held down the booster is faulty and will need to be replaced.

BPI 10-06 Temporary reduction in power brake ... - Raybestos Brakes

No. BPI 10-06 Subject: Temporary reduction in power brake assist in extreme cold weather Vehicles Involved: Models: 2009 BUICK ENCLAVE 2009 CHEVROLET TRAVERSE 2009 GMC ACADIA 2009 SATURN OUTLOOK From 9J100008 From 9S100002 From 9J100016 From 9J100003 to to to to 9J190898 9S143268 9J190899 9J190888 Condition: If the brake check valves are NOT installed correctly, an increased amount of brake pedal effort will be required to obtain brake function, and the brake assist system will NOT perform as designed. Repair: Replace the first design brake booster vacuum hose check valve (1) with a second design brake booster vacuum hose check valve (2). An arrow on the second design check valve indicates the vacuum draw direction (3). 1. Remove the fuel injector sight shield (engine cover) from the engine. 4400 Prime Parkway McHenry, IL 60050  (815) 363-9000 Determine where the two brake booster vacuum hose check valves are located. Refer to callouts 1 and 2 in the illustration 2. Release the quick connect (4) from the power brake booster auxiliary pump (3). 3. Remove the protective wrap (5) from the brake booster vacuum hose to locate check valve # (1). 4400 Prime Parkway McHenry, IL 60050  (815) 363-9000 4. Remove the check valve (1) from the brake booster vacuum hose that routes to the power brake booster auxiliary pump (3). 5. Remove the check valve (2) from the brake booster hose that routes to the intake manifold vacuum port (6). Note If necessary, a small amount of denatured alcohol can be used as an assembly aid for installing the vacuum hose to the manifold vacuum port. Do not use soap. 6. Install a new check valve (1) to the brake booster hose that routes to the power brake booster auxiliary pump (3). Ensure the arrow on the check valve (1) ...

The ATE T50 Brake Booster - 190SL | 190 SL

Fifty percent less pedal force I n most of the models of the 1950s and 1960s, Mercedes-Benz provided a power brake booster manufactured by ATE. The booster does not pro- vide additional braking capacity, a common misconception, but rather reduces the pedal force required for braking. The power brake is a vacuum-assisted hydraulic component using the pressure difference between engine intake manifold vacuum and atmospheric pressure for its operation. The power unit increases the pressure created physically in the brake master cylinder so that the same braking effect can be produced with less pedal effort. With a brake booster installed, the pedal force required for braking is reduced by 50 percent. The ATE T50 Brake Booster uses vacuum to “boost” the hydraulic brakeline pressure. The booster contains a hydraulic cylinder, a large vacuum piston that presses against the hydraulic cylinder, and a control circuit that regulates the vacuum flow based on brake-line pressures. This technology had been well proven since the early 1900s, and the T50 has been exceptionally reliable over many years of use. The Booster in action The power booster is a very simple design requiring only a vacuum source to operate. In gasoline-engine cars, the engine provides a vacuum suitable for the boosters. Because diesel engines do not produce a vacuum, dieselpowered vehicles must use a separate vacuum pump. A vacuum hose from the intake manifold on the engine pulls air from both sides of the diaphragm when the engine is running. When the driver steps on the brake pedal, the input rod assembly in the booster moves forward, blocking off the vacuum port to the backside of the diaphragm and opening an atmospheric port that allows air to enter the back chamber. Suddenly, the diaphragm has vacuum pulling against one side and air pressure pushing on the other. The result is forward pressure that assists in pushing the input rod, which in turn pushes the piston in the master cylinder. The amount of power assist that’s provided by the booster depends on the size of the diaphragm and the amount of intake manifold vacuum produced by the engine. A larger diaphragm will increase the boost.

Introduction to Brake Systems – Study Guide

Introduction Everybody knows that when you press your foot on the brake pedal the vehicle is supposed to stop. But how does the pressure from your foot get to the wheels with enough force to stop a heavy vehicle? In the following sections, we will study the systems and components required to allow brakes to work effectively. Course Objectives Upon completion of this course, technicians should understand and be able to apply their knowledge of: • • • • • • • • • • • • Brake functions and components Split hydraulic systems Master cylinder operations Balance control systems Power brake booster systems Disc brake operation Micrometer reading Drum brake operation Brake fluids Brake bleeding operations Brake lines and hoses Basic diagnosis Using the Job Sheets As you proceed through the online module, on some pages you will find links that will open a window with a printable procedure or job sheet containing hands-on lab activities based on the NATEF standards related to the content you are studying. When you come upon a procedure or job sheet link, click on it and print the job sheet for completion in the shop. See your instructor for guidance in completing the job sheets. Some jobs sheets will require supplemental materials such as a vehicle service manual, equipment manual, or other references. Brake System Functions Automotive brakes are designed to slow and stop a vehicle by transforming kinetic (motion) energy into heat energy. As the brake linings contact the drums/rotors they create friction which produces the heat energy. The intensity of the heat is proportional to the vehicle speed, the weight of the vehicle, and the quickness of the stop. Faster speeds, heavier vehicles, and quicker stops equal more heat. Automotive brake systems can be broken down into several different sub-systems (fig. 1): • Apply system • Boost system • Hydraulic system • Wheel brakes • Balance control system • Warning system (fig. 1) Base Brake Systems .

Your Webinar Will Begin Shortly - Motor Coach Industries

Welcome to the MCILEARN Series Your Webinar Will Begin Shortly Today’s Topic Shake Out: Vibration Analysis If you do not have an audio connection, dial 877-739-5904 and enter the Audio PIN number given to you on your screen © 2012 Motor Coach Industries Int'l, Inc. and its subsidiaries. All Rights Reserved. Learning Objectives • Identify the different classifications of vehicle driveline vibrations • Begin to diagnose & locate the source of a vehicle driveline vibration • Provide a correction to eliminate the vibration from the vehicle © 2012 Motor Coach Industries Int'l, Inc. and its subsidiaries. All Rights Reserved. Safety Message • Always use personal protection devices – Safety glasses, ear protection, etc • Always observe all safety precautions listed in the Maintenance Manual including but not limited to: – – – – – – Ensure coach is on a level surface Ensure parking brake is applied Chock wheels Always use jack stands Shut off batteries Utilize Lock Out/Tag Out procedures © 2012 Motor Coach Industries Int'l, Inc. and its subsidiaries. All Rights Reserved. Vibration Identification: Identifying the Source of a Vibration © 2012 Motor Coach Industries Int'l, Inc. and its subsidiaries. All Rights Reserved. Vibration Analysis Primary sources of vibrations • Tires & Wheels – Rims, tires, hub & drum assemblies • Driveline – Driveshaft & slip-joint, u-joints, yokes & flanges – Working angle of driveshaft • Engine & Transmission – Crankshaft, injectors & cylinders, vibration dampers, engine supports, exhaust...

Drive Line / Universal
by Maradoni 0 Comments favorite 3 Viewed Download 0 Times

– Drivelines and Universal Joints Universal Joint Maintenance • Most factory-installed universal joints are sealed and don’t require periodic lubrication • After-market replacement joints are equipped with a grease fitting and must be greased periodically Drive Shaft Problem Diagnosis • Road testing – Vehicle should be driven while accelerating and decelerating as well as at various steady speeds – Vibrations caused by worn U-joints usually occur while accelerating Types and Causes of Vibrations • High speed vibrations – Usually caused by driveshaft imbalance • Vibrations during acceleration – Usually caused by worn double Cardan joint ball and socket • Low speed vibrations – Usually caused by improper operating angles Noise Diagnosis • Clunking noise while accelerating from a dead stop – Usually caused by worn or damaged U-joint – Can be caused by problems including excessive clearance between slip joint and extension housing • Squeaking noise – Often caused by worn or poorly lubricated U-joint Reasons for Universal Joint Failure • Lack of lubrication • Pushing another car • Towing a trailer • Changing gears abruptly • Carrying heavy loads Steps in Lubricating U-Joints 1. Wipe off the nozzle of the fitting 2. Attach the hose of the grease gun to the fitting 3. Pump grease slowly into the fitting 4. Stop pumping when grease appears at the bearing cups Inspecting the Drive Shaft • Check for fluid leaks • Check the U-joints for signs of rust or leakage • Check for movement in the joint while trying to turn the yoke and the shaft in opposite directions • Check the drive shaft for dents, missing weights, and undercoating or dirt...

Noise, Vibration, & Harshness Diagnosis and Repair - CTO Pre-work

REVISED SEPTEMBER, 2011 This book is designed for instructional use only for authorized Nissan North America, Inc. and Nissan dealer personnel. For additional information contact: Nissan North America, Inc. Technical Training P.O. Box 685001 Franklin, TN 37068 © 2011 Nissan North America, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the prior written permission of the publisher. Nissan North America, Inc. Training Department Technical Training Revised Printing: September, 2011 This manual uses post consumer recycled fibers Training Department Technical Training Nissan North America, Inc. reserves the right to alter specifications or methods at any time.

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