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symptoms of a bad ignition switch in a dodge durango

Leak Masters for Slab Leak Detection

Leak Masters make a genuine name for accurate and non-invasive Slab Leak Detection. We have a team of experienced and well trained leak detection technicians and we use industry-leading technologies to easily locate all the types of leaks that could be existing in your slab. We can efficiently handle hidden water as well as sewer leaks in our client’s premises. We make sure to hit our target with the right technique and we are always dedicated to making it an absolutely hassle-free job for our clients. You detect the symptoms and we will treat the problem no matter it is in which corner of your building.For more information, we are available at www.Leakmastersusa.com

Cat renal Failure Symptoms
by dialyspa 0 Comments favorite 14 Viewed Download 0 Times

Far removed from the cold, impersonal atmosphere of high-volume facilities, our dialysis centers are designed from a patient’s perspective with a doctor’s medical insight—and no amenity has been spared, nor detail overlooked.

Breast Cancer, Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

To get best treatment for it, choose the best breast cancer treatment center in Arizona. Take an overview of breast cancer, its symptoms, causes and treatment.

Credi Diabetes and metabolic center

Know all about the Diabetes, how to treat Diabetes, its symptoms, Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes from Credi Diabetes and Metabolic center

Sublingual Immunotherapy
by Serologix 0 Comments favorite 4 Viewed Download 0 Times

Immunotherapy is widely used by allergy specialists because it treats the underlying cause of allergic reactions instead of temporarily alleviating symptoms. Immunotherapy is designed to gradually desensitize the immune system to specific allergens.

520 CRF 150R and 625 KX 450F 06-08 Flywheel ... - Steahly Offroad

Installation Instructions for CRF 150R and KX450F Steahly Flywheel Weight Warning: Improper instalation of this flywheel weight could result in engine damage or a serious crash. If you do not have the tools or the mechanical abilities take it to a professional. 1. Drain the engine oil or turn off the gas and lay the bike on its side. 2. Remove the shift lever. 3. Remove the ignition cover. Take care not to tear the gasket or have a new gasket on hand. Be carefull that you don’t lose the two dowel pins that are between the cover and the engine case. 4. Remove the flywheel nut. Use an air impact wrench or figure out a way to keep the flywheel from rotating while you remove the nut. A strap wrench or an automotive oil filter wrench may work as a holding tool or try putting the bike in high gear and holding the rear brake on. 5. Pull off the stock flywheel with the proper flywheel puller that has a crank end protection cap. Steahly part number E-63. Do not attempt removal with out the correct puller. Do not use claw type pullers. 6. Fit the flywheel weight on to the stock flywheel. Line up the two threaded holes in the weight with two holes in the stock flywheel. 7. Clean the threads of the two special bolts with contact cleaner. Put a big drop of red Loctite or other high strength thread locker on the threads of the 2 bolts. Install the two special bolts as shown in the picture and torque to 12 foot pounds. 8. Unless you plan to take the weight on and off a lot we highly recommend using a center punch and a hammer to flare out the threads at the end of the bolt (see pictures below). This will reduce the possibility of the bolt coming loose. 9. Clean up the flywheel and weight and remove any metal stuck to the magnets. 10. Install the flywheel with weight back onto the tapered crank shaft end making sure the key ways are lined up. Torque the stock nut to 42 ft- lbs.

CHRONIC FUNCTIONAL ABDOMINAL PAIN Reprinted with ...

Reprinted with permission from the IFFGD. Originally printed in Participate -- Vol 7 No 1, Spring 1998. Go to the IFFGD website for Information on subscribing to Participate (and becoming an IFFGD member). People with functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders can have a variety of symptoms that range from painless diarrhea or constipation, to pain associated with diarrhea and/or constipation (usually called irritable bowel syndrome). There is another, less common condition of abdominal pain that is chronic or frequently recurring; it is not associated with changes in bowel pattern. This condition is called chronic functional abdominal pain (CFAP). CFAP is a functional GI disorder. There are no abnormal x-rays or laboratory findings to explain the pain. It occurs because of altered sensitivity to nerve impulses in the gut and brain, and it is not associated with altered motility in the intestines. For people with CFAP, the pain can be so all-consuming that it becomes the main focus of their lives. Not only does it impact on quality of life, but it has a major economic impact as well. The US Householders Survey of Functional GI Disorders published in 1993 found that people with CFAP missed an average of 12 days of work annually due to illness compared to 4 missed days for people without gastrointestinal symptoms. Also, the number of doctor visits in a year averaged 11 for those with CFAP compared with only 2 for those without CFAP.

Salmonella: a bacteria that causes diarrhea, fever, and abdominal ...

Campylobacter: bacteria that causes diarrhea, cramping, abdominal pain and fever. Symptoms can start 2 to 5 days after exposure and usually last about one week. It is one of the most common causes of diarrheal illness in the US, especially during the summer. Prevention: always cook meat thoroughly. Keep raw meat, especially poultry, separate from other foods. Do not use the same utensils and plates for cooked foods that were used for raw foods until thoroughly washed. Always wash hands after touching raw meat. Do not drink “raw milk” (unpasteurized). Common Foods: poultry; contaminated water Salmonella: a bacteria that causes diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps. Symptoms can start 12 to 72 hours after infection and last 4-7 days. Can be so severe that hospitalization is required, especially if the bacteria spread to the bloodstream. Prevention: avoid eating undercooked foods, such as poultry, ground beef and eggs. Do not drink “raw milk.” Do not use the same utensils and plates for cooked foods that were used for raw foods until thoroughly washed. Always wash hands after touching raw meat. Common Foods: poultry; eggs; dairy products; beef E-Coli 0157: a bacteria that can cause severe stomach cramps, bloody diarrhea, vomiting and fever. Some infections can be lifethreatening and can lead to kidney failure. Symptoms usually occur 3-4 days after exposure but can start as soon as 1 day after exposure up to10 days after exposure. Prevention: wash hands before preparing food, after using the bathroom or diapering infants, and after contact with livestock and/or their food. Avoid eating undercooked ground beef, alfalfa sprouts, “raw milk” or unpasteurized cheeses.

Fact Sheet Abdominal Pain - CT.gov
by jonnae 0 Comments favorite 1 Viewed Download 0 Times

Pain that is in the stomach or belly area is called abdominal pain. Sometimes when it hurts in this area the problem may actually be in your chest or pelvic region. Abdominal pain is also called a belly ache, stomach ache, or abdominal cramps. SOME FACTS about Abdominal Pain Abdominal pain is a common problem. Most of the time it will go away without any medical care. Sometimes it is a sign of a very serious condition that can be life-threatening. It all depends upon the cause. How much it hurts is not always the most serious symptom. Pain that develops quickly and is localized (remains in the same place) in a small area requires immediate medical attention. People with mental retardation cannot always tell you what hurts. You need to look carefully for other signs (such as bending over and crying). Individuals with pain will often show changes in behavior. SIGNS & SYMPTOMS There are many different signs and symptoms for abdominal pain depending upon what the cause is. Some of the signs include: Pain in the area below the chest and above the groin (just below waist) Cramps in the belly area Crying and bending over, holding onto the belly area Burning feeling in the stomach or lower throat (esophagus) Lack of appetite and food avoidance ...

Emergency Department Visits for Chest Pain and Abdominal Pain

Emergency Department Visits for Chest Pain and Abdominal Pain: United States, 1999–2008 Farida A. Bhuiya, M.P.H.; Stephen R. Pitts, M.D., M.P.H., F.A.C.E.P.; and Linda F. McCaig, M.P.H., Division of Health Care Statistics Key findings Data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey: 1999–2008 • The number of noninjury emergency department (ED) visits in which abdominal pain was the primary reason for the visit increased 31.8%. • The percentage of ED visits for which chest pain was the primary reason decreased 10.0%. • Use of advanced medical imaging increased strongly for ED visits related to abdominal pain (122.6%) and chest pain (367.6%). Chest and abdominal pain are the most common reasons that persons aged 15 years and over visit the emergency department (ED) (1). Because EDs provide both emergency and nonemergency care (2,3), visits for these symptoms may vary in their acuity. Advanced medical imaging is often ordered to assist in both diagnosing and ruling out serious illness associated with these symptoms (4,5). This report describes trends in visits for chest and abdominal pain in adults and the seriousness of illness and use of imaging in these visits. All data shown are for persons aged 18 and over whose visit was not injury related. Keywords: National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey • advanced medical imaging • reason for visit Are ED visits for chest or abdominal pain increasing?

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