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Fact Sheet Abdominal Pain - CT.gov
by jonnae 0 Comments favorite 1 Viewed Download 0 Times

Pain that is in the stomach or belly area is called abdominal pain. Sometimes when it hurts in this area the problem may actually be in your chest or pelvic region. Abdominal pain is also called a belly ache, stomach ache, or abdominal cramps. SOME FACTS about Abdominal Pain Abdominal pain is a common problem. Most of the time it will go away without any medical care. Sometimes it is a sign of a very serious condition that can be life-threatening. It all depends upon the cause. How much it hurts is not always the most serious symptom. Pain that develops quickly and is localized (remains in the same place) in a small area requires immediate medical attention. People with mental retardation cannot always tell you what hurts. You need to look carefully for other signs (such as bending over and crying). Individuals with pain will often show changes in behavior. SIGNS & SYMPTOMS There are many different signs and symptoms for abdominal pain depending upon what the cause is. Some of the signs include: Pain in the area below the chest and above the groin (just below waist) Cramps in the belly area Crying and bending over, holding onto the belly area Burning feeling in the stomach or lower throat (esophagus) Lack of appetite and food avoidance ...

Emergency Department Visits for Chest Pain and Abdominal Pain

Emergency Department Visits for Chest Pain and Abdominal Pain: United States, 1999–2008 Farida A. Bhuiya, M.P.H.; Stephen R. Pitts, M.D., M.P.H., F.A.C.E.P.; and Linda F. McCaig, M.P.H., Division of Health Care Statistics Key findings Data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey: 1999–2008 • The number of noninjury emergency department (ED) visits in which abdominal pain was the primary reason for the visit increased 31.8%. • The percentage of ED visits for which chest pain was the primary reason decreased 10.0%. • Use of advanced medical imaging increased strongly for ED visits related to abdominal pain (122.6%) and chest pain (367.6%). Chest and abdominal pain are the most common reasons that persons aged 15 years and over visit the emergency department (ED) (1). Because EDs provide both emergency and nonemergency care (2,3), visits for these symptoms may vary in their acuity. Advanced medical imaging is often ordered to assist in both diagnosing and ruling out serious illness associated with these symptoms (4,5). This report describes trends in visits for chest and abdominal pain in adults and the seriousness of illness and use of imaging in these visits. All data shown are for persons aged 18 and over whose visit was not injury related. Keywords: National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey • advanced medical imaging • reason for visit Are ED visits for chest or abdominal pain increasing?

Abdominal Pain in Adults - MedEd Connect

Abdominal pain is the most common complaint seen in emergency departments in the United States and one of the 10 most common complaints in family medicine outpatient settings. The most common causes of abdominal pain are discussed here, with special attention given to the acute abdomen and recurrent abdominal pain. The term acute abdomen is medical jargon that refers to any acute condition within the abdomen that requires immediate medical or surgical attention. Acute abdominal pain may be of nonabdominal origin and does not always require surgery. The majority of patients who consult a physician about abdominal pain do not have an acute abdomen, although the chief complaint may have a sudden onset. In studies involving analysis of large series of patients presenting to emergency departments with acute abdominal pain, nonspecific abdominal pain (NSAP) was the most common diagnosis. Most patients with this symptom probably have gastroenteritis. The common causes of abdominal pain are gastroenteritis, gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), dysmenorrhea, salpingitis, appendicitis, cholecystitis, cholelithiasis, intestinal obstruction, mesenteric adenitis, diverticulitis, pancreatitis, ureterolithiasis, incarcerated hernias, gas entrapment syndromes, and ischemic bowel disease (particularly in the elderly). All of these conditions can manifest as an acute or sudden onset of abdominal pain, many can cause recurrent abdominal pain, and a few require surgical intervention. Any acute abdominal condition requires the physician to make an early, precise diagnosis, because prognosis often depends on prompt initiation of therapy, particularly surgical treatment. The more serious the problem, the more urgent the need for an accurate diagnosis.

information on new packaging design - Roche

Starting mid-2008, Roche introduces a new global packaging design for prescription medicines. This will meet requirements and expectations of health authorities, medical professionals and patients worldwide. The new packaging allows quick and easy identification of the medicine and dosage strength. one product colour specific dosage colour icon of pharmaceutical form dosage colour is repeated How was the design selected? Roche sought feedback from medical professionals and health authorities and reviewed possible design options with more than 700 doctors, pharmacists, nurses and patients worldwide. There was clear support for the selected new design and respondents particularly highlighted that it was easy to recognise. What are the new features? The new packaging design includes d •  istinct product and dosage colours for quick identification c •  olour banding visible from three sides p •  lunger rods and flip-off caps in dosage colours The design is in line with recent regulatory labelling guidelines and industry best practices. There will be no changes in pack dimensions and text. How will the design be implemented? The new packs will be phased in for Roche prescription medicines between mid-2008 and 2010 (approx.). C •  ellCept, Copegus, Pegasys and Xeloda will be the first medicines to feature the new packaging design (some country-specific exceptions) T •  he remaining medicines will change over the coming months Packs in the old design will not be replaced and can be used until expiry. Please contact your local Roche Office for country-specific details. F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd 4070 Basel Switzerland www.roche.com © 2008

The Most Common Medical Billing Errors

http://cpc.certifiedcodertraining.com/index.php/what-is-medical-coding | Common medical billing errors are made every day, leading to a decrease in cash flow for the medical provider, and unpaid claims that the patient must often pay. Coding certification results in medical billers who are less likely to make these errors, so that both the medical provider and patient benefit.

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WSJ NBC News Poll - Wall Street Journal

Study #13528 -- page 1 NBC News/Wall Street Journal Survey Interviews: 1000 Adults, including 300 cell phone only respondents Date: December 4-8, 2013 48 Male 52 Female Study #13528 NBC News/Wall Street Journal Survey Please note: all results are shown as percentages unless otherwise stated. The margin of error for 1000 interviews among Adults is ±3.10% Unless otherwise noted by a “+”, all previous data shown reflects responses among all adults. Q2a For statistical purposes only, would you please tell me how old you are? (IF “REFUSED,” ASK:) Well, would you tell me which age group you belong to? (READ LIST) 18-24 .................................................................... 25-29 .................................................................... 30-34 .................................................................... 35-39 .................................................................... 40-44 .................................................................... 45-49 .................................................................... 50-54 .................................................................... 55-59 .................................................................... 60-64 .................................................................... 65-69 .................................................................... 70-74 .................................................................... 75 and over .......................................................... Not sure/refused ................................................ Q2b To ensure that we have a representative sample, would you please tell me whether you are from a Hispanic or Spanish-speaking background? Yes, Hispanic ................................................... No, not Hispanic .............................................. Not sure/refused ............................................ Q2c 12 6 10 8 11 7 9 10 10 5 4 6 2 11 89 - And again, for statistical purposes only, what is your race--white, black, Asian, or something else? White .............................................................. Black .............................................................. Asian .............................................................. Other .............................................................. Hispanic (VOL) ............................................. Not sure/refused .......................................... 74 12 3 4 6 1 HART RESEARCH ASSOCIATES/PUBLIC OPINION STRATEGIES December 2013 Q3 Study #13528 -- page 2 NBC News/Wall Street Journal Survey All in all, do you think things in the nation are generally headed in the right direction, or do you feel things are off on the wrong track? High 9/01 72 11 11 6 Low 10/1720/08+ 12 78 7 3 4/11 28 63 6 3 2/11 31 60 6 3 1/11 35 56

NBC poll - Wall Street Journal
by MitraKalita 0 Comments favorite 4 Viewed Download 0 Times

Date: October 7-9, 2013 48 Male 52 Female Study #13413 NBC News/Wall Street Journal Survey Please note: all results are shown as percentages unless otherwise stated. The margin of error for 800 interviews among Adults is ±3.46% Unless otherwise noted by a “+”, all previous data shown reflects responses among all adults. Q2a For statistical purposes only, would you please tell me how old you are? (IF “REFUSED,” ASK:) Well, would you tell me which age group you belong to? (READ LIST.) 18-24 .................................................................... 25-29 .................................................................... 30-34 .................................................................... 35-39 .................................................................... 40-44 .................................................................... 45-49 .................................................................... 50-54 .................................................................... 55-59 .................................................................... 60-64 .................................................................... 65-69 .................................................................... 70-74 .................................................................... 75 and over .......................................................... Not sure/refused ................................................ Q2b To ensure that we have a representative sample, would you please tell me whether you are from a Hispanic or Spanish-speaking background? Yes, Hispanic ................................................... No, not Hispanic .............................................. Not sure/refused ............................................ Q2c 10 7 11 8 11 7 9 9 11 6 4 6 1 11 88 1 And again, for statistical purposes only, what is your race--white, black, Asian, or something else? White .............................................................. Black .............................................................. Asian .............................................................. Other .............................................................. Hispanic (VOL) ............................................. Not sure/refused ..........................................

Oct. 25-28 - Wall Street Journal
by MitraKalita 0 Comments favorite 2 Viewed Download 0 Times

Study #13452 -- page 1 NBC News/Wall Street Journal Survey Interviews: 800 Adults, including 240 cell phone only respondents Date: October 25-28, 2013 48 Male 52 Female Study #13452 NBC News/Wall Street Journal Survey Please note: all results are shown as percentages unless otherwise stated. The margin of error for 800 interviews among Adults is ±3.46% Unless otherwise noted by a “+”, all previous data shown reflects responses among all adults. Q2a For statistical purposes only, would you please tell me how old you are? (IF “REFUSED,” ASK:) Well, would you tell me which age group you belong to? (READ LIST.) 18-24 .................................................................... 25-29 .................................................................... 30-34 .................................................................... 35-39 .................................................................... 40-44 .................................................................... 45-49 .................................................................... 50-54 .................................................................... 55-59 .................................................................... 60-64 .................................................................... 65-69 .................................................................... 70-74 .................................................................... 75 and over .......................................................... Not sure/refused ................................................ Q2b To ensure that we have a representative sample, would you please tell me whether you are from a Hispanic or Spanish-speaking background? Yes, Hispanic ................................................... No, not Hispanic .............................................. Not sure/refused ............................................ Q2c 10 8 9 9 11 7 8 10 12 6 4 5 1 11 89 - And again, for statistical purposes only, what is your race--white, black, Asian, or something else? White .............................................................. Black .............................................................. Asian .............................................................. Other .............................................................. Hispanic (VOL) ............................................. Not sure/refused .......................................... 74 12 2 4 7 1 HART RESEARCH ASSOCIATES/PUBLIC OPINION STRATEGIES Late October 2013 Q3 Study #13452 -- page 2 NBC News/Wall Street Journal Survey All in all, do you think things in the nation are generally headed in the right direction, or do you feel things are off on the wrong track? High 9/01 72 11 11 6

Wall Street Journal Publishes Chair's Letter to the Editor (May 7, 2014)

Today the Wall Street Journal published a letter to the editor from Commission chair Judge Patti B. Saris regarding Mortimer Zuckerman’s op-ed “Harsh Sentencing, Overstuffed Prisons—It’s Time for Reform” (May 3, 2014): Sentencing Guidelines Are Being Intelligently Adjusted The amendment originated with the U.S. Sentencing Commission and is something we carefully considered over several years. Regarding Mortimer Zuckerman’s “Harsh Sentencing, Overstuffed Prisons—It’s Time for Reform” (op-ed, May 3): Mr. Zuckerman mentions a Justice Department sentencing panel proposing an amendment to federal guidelines. In fact, it was the U.S. Sentencing Commission, an independent, bipartisan agency that is part of the judicial branch, which voted unanimously on April 10 to amend the federal sentencing guidelines to modestly reduce sentences for the majority of federal drug offenders. We appreciated the support for this change from the Justice Department and others ranging from bipartisan members of Congress to the Federal Public and Community Defenders to Right on Crime, but the amendment originated with the commission and is something we carefully considered over several years. This amendment has been transmitted to Congress and unless Congress acts to disapprove, it will go into effect Nov. 1, 2014. The federal sentencing guidelines are advisory but carry substantial weight in determining federal sentences. The amendment reduces the guideline levels assigned to most drug-trafficking offenders based on the quantity of drugs involved in the offense. The commission determined that the guideline levels for drug quantity no longer needed to be so high. We estimate that our amendment will affect the sentences of almost 70% of federal drugtrafficking offenders and reduce their sentences by 11 months on average. These sentence reductions will correspond to a reduction in the federal prison population of approximately 6,500 inmates within five years and many more over time. The commission carefully weighed public safety concerns, and based on past experience, existing laws and guidelines and expert testimony it concluded that the amendment should not jeopardize public safety. Our amendment is modest in scope; only Congress can change statutory mandatory minimum penalties. But we believe it is an important start.

Long-Term Health Risks and Benefits Associated with Spay / Neuter ...

At some point, most of us with an interest in dogs will have to consider whether or not to spay / neuter our pet. Tradition holds that the benefits of doing so at an early age outweigh the risks. Often, tradition holds sway in the decision-making process even after countervailing evidence has accumulated. Ms Sanborn has reviewed the veterinary medical literature in an exhaustive and scholarly treatise, attempting to unravel the complexities of the subject. More than 50 peer-reviewed papers were examined to assess the health impacts of spay / neuter in female and male dogs, respectively. One cannot ignore the findings of increased risk from osteosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma, hypothyroidism, and other less frequently occurring diseases associated with neutering male dogs. It would be irresponsible of the veterinary profession and the pet owning community to fail to weigh the relative costs and benefits of neutering on the animal’s health and well-being. The decision for females may be more complex, further emphasizing the need for individualized veterinary medical decisions, not standard operating procedures for all patients. No sweeping generalizations are implied in this review. Rather, the author asks us to consider all the health and disease information available as individual animals are evaluated. Then, the best decisions should be made accounting for gender, age, breed, and even the specific conditions under which the long-term care, housing and training of the animal will occur.

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