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sample proposal for action research on classroom management

The Woo Group RBC Wealth Management Tokyo Featured Reports

On Regulatory Reform and Restoring Trust in Our Financial System and Markets is a message to investors from John Taft, CEO of RBC U.S. Wealth Management. Government Health Care Programs Fundamentals offers guidelines for making well-informed decisions regarding retirement health care planning.

iGeek, Inc. releases Indelible FS

1888 PressRelease - iGeek, Inc. today announced the Beta release of Indelible FS, the Open Source Storage Management System and Technology Partnership with Kyocera Communication Systems Co., Ltd. (KCCS).

Rental Homes In Corpus Christi
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The professionals at The Rental Management Company provide stylish and affordable rental homes Corpus Christi, Texas. The listing of vacation rental homes includes condos, single family homes, town homes and apartments. To search for a rental home or apartment in Corpus Christi, visit - www.rentalmgmt.com

IBM Cognos TM1 Training Bistech
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BM Cognos TM1 Training offered public or onsite classroom training; computer based training, or instructor-led online courses, our standard and customised training programs. Visit Now!

Grinding Machines
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Pedestal Grinder A Pedestal Grinder is primarily used in Design & Technology for heavy general purpose grinding operations. Grinding is the process of removing material by the cutting action of the countless hard and sharp abrasive particles of a revolving grinding wheel as they come in contact with the surface to be ground. The grinding wheels are held between two flanged disks. Usually a roughing or coarse-grained wheel is mounted on one end of the spindle and a fine wheel on the other. A tool rest is provided for each wheel so that the work piece may be held or steadied while being ground. The operator is protected against flying abrasive particles and ground material by the wheel guards and spark arrestors, which are integral parts of a machine. Safety glass shields are also provided for additional protection. WARNING The main types of injury are caused by: • Entanglement of hair or clothing in rotating machinery parts. • Fingers being caught between grinder wheel and work rest. • Sparks or worn abrasive may be thrown by the grinding action. • Body parts coming into contact with abrasive wheel. • Ejected material or disintegrated abrasive wheel. • Hot metal. Acknowledgment http://www.brobo.com.au

JANE WILLIAMS - Rhode Island College
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JANE WILLIAMS, PhD, RN Dean and Professor of Nursing School of Nursing, Rhode Island College 600 Mt. Pleasant Avenue, Providence, RI 02908 TEL: 401 456-9608: FAX: 401 456-8206 Email: jwilliams@ric.edu CURRENT EMPLOYMENT Rhode Island College, Dean and Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, 1975-present; initial appointment as assistant professor, 1975; appointed Professor, 1995, Department Chairperson, 2000, and Dean, 2007. EDUCATION University of Rhode Island, College of Nursing, Kingston, Rhode Island, Ph.D., Nursing, 1995. New York University, School of Education, New York, New York, M.A., Major in Education and Minor in Nursing, 1968; University of Michigan, School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, Michigan, B.S.N. with Distinction, 1966. PUBLICATIONS Williams, J., Brumbaugh, M. & Vares, L., (2006), “Education to improve interdisciplinary practice of health care professionals: A pilot project”, Medicine & Health, Rhode Island, 89 (9), p. 312-313. Mosser, N., Williams, J. & Wood, C. (2006), “The use of progression testing throughout nursing programs: How two colleges promote success on NCLEX-RN”. Annual Review of Nursing Education. Vol.4, p. 305-319. Newman, M. and Williams, J. (2003) "Educating Nurses in Rhode Island: A lot of diversity in a little place", Journal of Cultural Diversity, Vol. 10, No. 3, p. 91-95. Williams, J., (2001) “The Clinical Notebook: Using Student Portfolios to Enhance Teaching and Learning, Journal of Nursing Education. Vol. 40, p. 135-137. Ferszt, G., Massotti, E., Miller, J. & Williams, J. (2000) “Art on Rounds: Research Study of an in-patient oncology unit”, Illness Crisis and Loss. Vol. 8, No. 2, pp. 189-199. Williams, J. (1999) “When Interns Meet Managed Care” [Letter to the Editor]. New York Times, p. 30A. Williams, J., Wood, C., & Cunningham-Warburton, P. (1999) “A Narrative Study of Chemotherapy-Induced Alopecia”. Oncology Nursing Forum. Vol. 26, pp. 1463-1468. Willliams, J. (1999) “Health Policy Tool Kit Helps Students to Get Involved”. ONS Newsletter, 14 (9) p 5.

Rhode Island College Anchor Notes - Rhode Island College Athletics

Rhode Island College Anchor Notes The Official Newsletter of Rhode Island College Intercollegiate Athletics www.ric.edu/athletics Vol. VI No. 2 Providence, Rhode Island Fall Review/Winter Preview December, 2004 Michael Morrison Joins RIC Staff Inside this edition Tabbed to head up athletic development Morrison joins RIC staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 1 Soccer stadium project update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 1 2004 fall season summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 2 Upcoming home winter sports dates . . . . . . . . . . Page 3 Dates to remember . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 3 Vin Cullen ‘55 honored. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 3 75th Anniversary events taking place . . . . . . . . . . Page 4 Anchor Club membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 4 Rh ode Island College has n am ed Michael Morrison the Assistant Athletic Director for Athletic Development. He is responsible for the day-to-day management of the department’s development init iativ es in clud ing fun draisin g and marketing activities. “I am very excited about joining the Rh ode Is land College Athletic Michael Morrison Department,” Morrison says. “I am looking forward to working with RIC Athletic Dir ector Don Tencher and Anchor Club Executive Director Art Pontarelli and hope to continue the success that they’ve had over the past five years.” RIC Athletic Direct or Don Tencher says, “W are e extremely glad to have Mike Morrison joining our athletic family. Mike brings successful experience, ener gy, and a strong work ethic to the fundraising side of our house. I am confident that Mike’s efforts will result in positive results that will benefit the athletic program, our student-athletes and our alumni.”

The ATE T50 Brake Booster - 190SL | 190 SL

Fifty percent less pedal force I n most of the models of the 1950s and 1960s, Mercedes-Benz provided a power brake booster manufactured by ATE. The booster does not pro- vide additional braking capacity, a common misconception, but rather reduces the pedal force required for braking. The power brake is a vacuum-assisted hydraulic component using the pressure difference between engine intake manifold vacuum and atmospheric pressure for its operation. The power unit increases the pressure created physically in the brake master cylinder so that the same braking effect can be produced with less pedal effort. With a brake booster installed, the pedal force required for braking is reduced by 50 percent. The ATE T50 Brake Booster uses vacuum to “boost” the hydraulic brakeline pressure. The booster contains a hydraulic cylinder, a large vacuum piston that presses against the hydraulic cylinder, and a control circuit that regulates the vacuum flow based on brake-line pressures. This technology had been well proven since the early 1900s, and the T50 has been exceptionally reliable over many years of use. The Booster in action The power booster is a very simple design requiring only a vacuum source to operate. In gasoline-engine cars, the engine provides a vacuum suitable for the boosters. Because diesel engines do not produce a vacuum, dieselpowered vehicles must use a separate vacuum pump. A vacuum hose from the intake manifold on the engine pulls air from both sides of the diaphragm when the engine is running. When the driver steps on the brake pedal, the input rod assembly in the booster moves forward, blocking off the vacuum port to the backside of the diaphragm and opening an atmospheric port that allows air to enter the back chamber. Suddenly, the diaphragm has vacuum pulling against one side and air pressure pushing on the other. The result is forward pressure that assists in pushing the input rod, which in turn pushes the piston in the master cylinder. The amount of power assist that’s provided by the booster depends on the size of the diaphragm and the amount of intake manifold vacuum produced by the engine. A larger diaphragm will increase the boost.

Propeller drive systems and torsional vibration - The Bugatti 100p ...

Written by Donald P. Hessenaur As aircraft engine prices continue to rise beyond the reach of most who would like to build and fly their own aircraft, many are turning to alternate power sources. This is not a new phenomenon. From the Wright brothers on, many have designed, built or converted engines to aircraft use. At one time or another engines have been used from automobiles, motorcycles, outboard motors and even snowmobiles, with varying degrees of success or failure. AUTO ENGINE CONVERSIONS Today many automotive engine conversions are appearing on the aviation scene. They are definitely a viable alternative. The automotive engine today is very advanced technically and relatively low in cost when compared to Lycomings and/or Continentals. Unfortunately, automotive engines are designed and optimized for the automobile and not for aircraft. Generally auto engines operate at a much higher RPM. The torsional vibration characteristics of a given engine, connected to a transmission, drive train and wheels, are quite different from that of the same engine, connected to an aircraft propeller. The damping action of the tires on the road and the inertia effects of the mass of the automobile are not even close to the damping/inertia effects of a propeller turning in air.

XT100-08am Driveshaft Vibration.pdf - JagRepair.com - Jaguar ...

X-TYPE DATE 05/04 Amended 09/04 XT100-08 TECHNICAL BULLETIN SERVICE Driveshaft Vibration – Diagnostic Method – Repair MODEL 2002-04 MY X-TYPE VIN C00001-E02938 Remove and destroy Bulletin XT100-08, dated 05/04. Replace with this Bulletin. Revisions are marked with a bar and in bold text. Issue: A new procedure has been developed for use after the WDS Vehicle Vibration Analyzer (VVA) has confirmed a vehicle vibration. Action: After a driveshaft vibration has been confirmed using WDS VVA, follow the workshop procedure outlined below. WORKSHOP PROCEDURE Note: There is no Labor Time Allowance to carry out road test diagnosis. Jaguar recommends a claim of 0.50 hrs. as straight time for VVA. Warning: Driveshaft bolts are one-time use only. Use new bolts for the final repair. Existing bolts may be reused throughout the diagnostic procedures. Raise vehicle on twin-post lift. Check for alignment of the green line on the rear differential flange with white paint spot on the rear of the driveshaft. If not aligned continue from step 3; if aligned continue from step 16. Remove the rear driveshaft joint to rear differential flange bolts and links where accessible. Rotate the driveshaft and remove the remaining rear driveshaft joint to rear differential flange securing bolts and links. Displace driveshaft from the rear differential flange. Remove and discard the gasket from the rear differential flange (where installed). Clean the mating faces. Install a new gasket to the rear differential flange, if previously installed. NOTE: THE INFORMATION IN TECHNICAL BULLETINS IS INTENDED FOR USE BY TRAINED, PROFESSIONAL TECHNICIANS WITH THE KNOWLEDGE, TOOLS, AND EQUIPMENT TO DO THE JOB PROPERLY AND SAFELY. IT INFORMS THESE TECHNICIANS OF CONDITIONS THAT MAY OCCUR ON SOME VEHICLES, OR PROVIDES INFORMATION THAT COULD ASSIST IN PROPER VEHICLE SERVICE. THE PROCEDURES SHOULD NOT BE PERFORMED BY “DO-ITYOURSELFERS.” DO NOT ASSUME THAT A CONDITION DESCRIBED AFFECTS YOUR CAR. CONTACT A JAGUAR RETAILER TO DETERMINE WHETHER THE BULLETIN APPLIES TO YOUR VEHICLE. Date of issue 05/04 Amended 09/04

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