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physics form 4 chapter 1 mind map

Buying guides
by banyo 0 Comments favorite 20 Viewed Download 0 Times

After computers and laptops, Ovens are most used appliances in a house. So, you can imagine how important it is to have ovens right but finding that ‘right’ is not easy errand by any means. With an array of features, functions and forms from different brands in mind, simple buying oven can become complete detour from sanity. Never mind, its ovens not your door knobs.

FAQs Dragon Boats 101: What Every Participant Needs to Know ...

Dragon Boats 101: What Every Participant Needs to Know Requirements: Each crew must have a maximum of 20 paddlers in the boat plus 1 drummer. (4 additional names can be listed on the roster as spares.) You must be ready for marshalling 40 minutes prior to your race. Guaranteed minimum 2 races per crew. The 3rd race features the top 8 teams. Each race from boarding to disembarking lasts about 12 minutes. Paddling during the race is less than 3 minutes. Race Day Schedule will be provided a week before the races for the 1st heat. Mandatory 1-hour practice sessions at Gallup (Old Picnic Shelter): Friday, Sept. 28th 3:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 29th 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Team captains sign up (first-come, first-serve). Introduction to dragon boats and racing techniques. Mark your team practice time on the Individual Form and Waiver. If you cannot make your team time, select times that you are available and you will practice with other participants. Arrive 20 minutes -1/2 hour prior to practice. Your left-or right-handedness will determine the side of the boat on which you paddle. Event T-shirts will be distributed at the practice sessions. Race Day: It is advisable to arrive at least one hour before your first race to meet your team and warm up.

School Information - Cal Club
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So you want to go wheel to wheel racing! SCCA is the best way to do it and Cal Club is one of SCCA’s best regions. We offer a variety of tracks and car classes. Our competition license schools are held every March at Buttonwillow Raceway Park. If you have racing experience you may be able to get a waiver for the school requirements. The License Waiver Checklist will lead you through that process. The License waiver form can be found on our web site under Road Racing, SCCA license, If you do not qualify for a waiver here is what you will need to do: The successful completion of the driver school requirements is a pre-requisite to getting an SCCA Competition license. It can be a bit confusing and we hope the explanations below will help you through the process, but always feel free to contact the office at 661-304-9382 or calclubhq@aol.com. 1. You must be a member of SCCA. Membership forms can be found on our web site under Road Racing, SCCA License 2. You must apply for a Novice Permit (Form can be found on our web site under Road Racing, SCCA license) from SCCA. You will need to have a medical exam (forms can be found on our web site under Road Racing, SCCA License) allow yourself plenty of time to apply for the Novice permit, it will take SCCA about 3 weeks to process the paperwork. Make sure that you send in the Novice Permit Application, the Medical forms (completely filled out) and payment for the Novice Permit of $110. When you send in all the paper work to SCCA in Topeka make sure to keep COPIES of everything! After sending in the required paperwork you will receive your permit and a GCR (General Competition Rules) book in the mail from the Topeka office of SCCA. Bring all that to Registration at the track the day of the school.

TECHNICAL INFORMATION - Tool Parts Direct

CONCEPTION AND MAIN APPLICATIONS 225mm Break system and Large protector have been provided for the case of Kick Back. Also Auto Oil-feeding system for better lubrication of chain blade. These are designed to conform to the safety standards in developted countries. m 60m m B:7 5m 4N B:79 501 6N 501 Specifications Voltage(V) 100 115 200 220 230 240 Current(A) Frequency(Hz) Consumed power(W) 14 50-60 1300 12 50-60 1300 7 50-60 1300 6.5 50-60 1300 6 50-60 1300 6 50-60 1300 Chain blade speed Effecting cutting 5014NB capacity 5016NB 5014NB Weight 5016NB Cord length Standard 230mm Models No. New Tool Rated output(W) 770 770 770 770 770 770 Max. output(W) 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 1600 400 m/min. 340 mm 375 mm 6 kg 6.3 kg 5m equipment Oil vessel(Turbine oil #200, 100 cc contained) Guide bar case Box wrench 13 Minus screw driver 6(for adjusting the chain cutter) File The standard equipment for the tools shown may differ form country to country Features and benefits 1. Brake for instantaneously stopping You can operate without anxiety since the built-in bake unit allows the chain cutter motion to stop within 0.1 sec. after the brake lever has been activated. 2. Automatic oil-feeding system The oil pump motion will start to lubricate the chain blade simultaneously on starting of the motor operation, thereby the extension of the chain cutter can be minimized to prolong the service life of the guide bar. 3. Safety design for each section The large protector and the safety shape of the handle are designed to conform to the various safety standards in the main countries throughout the world. 4. Guide bar mounted with the sprocket The sprocket mounted on the edge of the guide bar allows the chain blade to run smoothly and the service life of the guide bar to be extended further. Capacities Since this machine’s motor has the same characteristics and reduction gear ratio as the ones of #5014B, the cutting efficiency etc. is the same.

The TaxSqueal Process by Tax Squeal report tax fraud

It’s Easy To Report Your Allegation Of Tax Fraud! 1. Complete the Official TaxSqueal Allegation Form. Be sure to provide as many of the key details requested as possible. Only the allegation information entered on the form will be submitted to the IRS or proper taxing authority, no other identifiers. 2. Following a TaxSqueal referral to the IRS or proper taxing authority on your behalf, all information and identifiers associated with the allegation are immediately purged from TaxSqueal’s records. Remember, TaxSqueal never knows your identity, nor does it possess the ability to determine your identity. 3. Please be prepared to hear nothing further. Tax agencies have strict privacy rules that limit or preclude updates or progress reports regarding tax matters. Rest assured that your TaxSqueal submission will be handled appropriately and confidentially.

Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability ...

Human interference with the climate system is occurring,1 and climate change poses risks for human and natural systems (Figure SPM.1). The assessment of impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability in the Working Group II contribution to the IPCC’s Fifth Assessment Report (WGII AR5) evaluates how patterns of risks and potential benefits are shifting due to climate change. It considers how impacts and risks related to climate change can be reduced and managed through adaptation and mitigation. The report assesses needs, options, opportunities, constraints, resilience, limits, and other aspects associated with adaptation. Climate change involves complex interactions and changing likelihoods of diverse impacts. A focus on risk, which is new in this report, supports decision-making in the context of climate change, and complements other elements of the report. People and societies may perceive or rank risks and potential benefits differently, given diverse values and goals. Compared to past WGII reports, the WGII AR5 assesses a substantially larger knowledge base of relevant scientific, technical, and socioeconomic literature. Increased literature has facilitated comprehensive assessment across a broader set of topics and sectors, with expanded coverage of human systems, adaptation, and the ocean. See Background Box SPM.1.2 Section A of this summary characterizes observed impacts, vulnerability and exposure, and adaptive responses to date. Section B examines future risks and potential benefits. Section C considers principles for effective adaptation and the broader interactions among adaptation, mitigation, and sustainable development. Background Box SPM.2 defines central concepts, and Background Box SPM.3 introduces terms used to convey the degree of certainty in key findings. Chapter references in brackets and in footnotes indicate support for findings, figures, and tables. Figure SPM.1: Illustration of the core concepts of the WGII AR5. Risk of climate-related impacts results from the interaction of climate-related hazards (including hazardous events and trends) with the vulnerability and exposure of human and natural systems. Changes in both the climate system (left) and socioeconomic processes including adaptation and mitigation (right) are drivers of hazards, exposure, and vulnerability. [19.2, Figure 19-1]...

IPCC AR4 Chapter 10 - Global Climate Projections

The future climate change results assessed in this chapter are based on a hierarchy of models, ranging from AtmosphereOcean General Circulation Models (AOGCMs) and Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity (EMICs) to Simple Climate Models (SCMs). These models are forced with concentrations of greenhouse gases and other constituents derived from various emissions scenarios ranging from nonmitigation scenarios to idealised long-term scenarios. In general, we assess non-mitigated projections of future climate change at scales from global to hundreds of kilometres. Further assessments of regional and local climate changes are provided in Chapter 11. Due to an unprecedented, joint effort by many modelling groups worldwide, climate change projections are now based on multi-model means, differences between models can be assessed quantitatively and in some instances, estimates of the probability of change of important climate system parameters complement expert judgement. New results corroborate those given in the Third Assessment Report (TAR). Continued greenhouse gas emissions at or above current rates will cause further warming and induce many changes in the global climate system during the 21st century that would very likely be larger than those observed during the 20th century. Mean Temperature All models assessed here, for all the non-mitigation scenarios considered, project increases in global mean surface air temperature (SAT) continuing over the 21st century, driven mainly by increases in anthropogenic greenhouse gas concentrations, with the warming proportional to the associated radiative forcing. There is close agreement of globally averaged SAT multi-model mean warming for the early 21st century for concentrations derived from the three non-mitigated IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES: B1, A1B and A2) scenarios (including only anthropogenic forcing) run by the AOGCMs (warming averaged for 2011 to 2030 compared to 1980 to 1999 is between +0.64°C and +0.69°C, with a range of only 0.05°C). Thus, this warming rate is affected little by different scenario assumptions or different model sensitivities, and is consistent with that observed for the past few decades (see Chapter 3).

What's In a Name? Global Warming Versus Climate Change

This report is based on findings from a bi-annual series of nationally representative survey studies – Climate Change in the American Mind – conducted by the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication (http://environment.yale.edu/climate-communication) and the George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication (http://www.climatechangecommunication.org). The research was funded by the Energy Foundation, the 11th Hour Project, the Grantham Foundation, and the V.K. Rasmussen Foundation. Principal Investigators: Anthony Leiserowitz, PhD Yale Project on Climate Change Communication School of Forestry & Environmental Studies Yale University anthony.leiserowitz@yale.edu Geoff Feinberg Yale Project on Climate Change Communication School of Forestry & Environmental Studies Yale University geoffrey.feinberg@yale.edu Seth Rosenthal, PhD Yale Project on Climate Change Communication School of Forestry & Environmental Studies Yale University seth.rosenthal@yale.edu Nicholas Smith, PhD Division of Psychology and Language Sciences University College London nicholas.smith@ucl.ac.uk Ashley Anderson, PhD Department of Journalism & Technical Communication Colorado State University ashley.a.anderson@colostate.edu Connie Roser-Renouf, PhD Center for Climate Change Communication Department of Communication George Mason University croserre@gmu.edu

The Ethical implications of global climate change: report by ... - Unesco

Building on previous COMEST work on environmental ethics,1 this report was initiated in direct response to the request of the General Conference of UNESCO, addressed to the Director-General of UNESCO, to develop a UNESCO Strategy for Action on Climate Change that aims “to build and maintain the requisite knowledge base, and to adopt measures to adapt to the impacts of climate change, contribute to the mitigation of its causes, and strengthen sustainable development” (Executive Board Document 180 EX/16, p. 1).2 Without serious attention to the ethical implications of climate change, this Strategy for Action may be weaker than it could be. The aim of this report is to serve as a point of departure for further discussion and dialogue among members of the scientific community of UNESCO, the NGOs working with UNESCO, and Member States of UNESCO on the ethical challenges posed by climate change as a global phenomenon. In particular, the focus of this report falls on a clarification of: 1. The central ethical issues that are brought about by global climate change; and 2. The general and specific principles that could be adopted to form a basis for response to these issues. This report acknowledges and supports other work that is done on climate change within the network of United Nations organizations, for instance the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) formed in 1988 by the World Meteorological Organization and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP).3 The ongoing work of the IPCC in establishing a scientific basis for discussions on climate change, and the ongoing negotiations between parties to the UNFCCC with a view to entering into binding international agreements on mechanisms and targets to address the challenges of climate change – these are all accepted as points of reference for the work of COMEST on the ethical implications of climate change.

Metro-North Dental
by Midene 0 Comments favorite 6 Viewed Download 0 Times

Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Group Number: 94072 To Be Completed by Employee (You must review the important statements on page 2 and sign where indicated before completing this section of the form.) 1. Patient First Name Middle Last 2. Relationship to Employee 3. Sex 4. Married? 5. Patient Date of Birth 6. Report Number Mo. / Day / Year Ⅺ Self Ⅺ Spouse Ⅺ Child Ⅺ Male Ⅺ Yes Ⅺ Other Ⅺ Female Ⅺ No 7. If Full Time Student (Age 19 or Over) School City 8. EMPLOYEE Social Security / ID Number State 9. If Disabled (Age 19 or Over) 94075 10. Name of Group Dental Program MTA Consolidated Managerial Plan Ⅺ Yes Ⅺ No 11. Employee First Name Middle Last 14. Employee Residence Mailing Address 15. City, State, Zip Ⅺ Yes Ⅺ No 16. Are other Family Members Employed? 13. Office Phone (Area Code) 12. Employee Date of Birth Name 17. Date of Birth 18. Name and Address of Employer for Item 16 Social Security / ID Number. 19. Is Patient Covered by Another Dental Plan? Dental Plan Name Ⅺ Yes Ⅺ No (If Yes, complete the following:) Name and Address of Carrier Group No. 20. I Authorize Release of any Information Relating to this Claim 21. I Certify that the Above Information is Correct. 22. I Authorize Payment Directly to the Below Named Dentist. ____________________________________ Employee Signature _______________________________________ (Signature of Patient or Signature of Authorized Representative if Minor) __________________________________ Employee Signature _______________ Date If Authorized Representative, Relationship to Minor __________________ Date __________________ Date To Be Completed by Dentist 23. Dentist Name 24. Mailing Address 25. Dentist Social Security Number or T.I.N. 28. First Visit Date Current Series City State Zip 27. Dentist Phone Number 26. Dentist License Number 29. Place of Treatment 30. Radiographs or Models Enclosed? Ⅺ Office Ⅺ Hospital Ⅺ ECF Ⅺ Other _______________________________________ Ⅺ Yes Ⅺ No How Many?_____________ 31. Is Treatment Result of Occupational Illness or Injury? (If Yes, Enter Brief Description and Dates) Ⅺ Yes Ⅺ No 33. Other Accident? Ⅺ Yes Ⅺ No (If Yes, Enter Brief Description and Dates) 35. If Prosthesis, is this Initial Placement? 37. Is Treatment for Orthodontics?

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