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phd thesis evaluation report

Study shows stem cell therapy using a patient's own bone marrow ...

TIME study mirrors Late TIME trial in confirming autologous stem cells obtained from bone marrow are safe but do not further improve the recovery of heart function following a heart attack MINNEAPOLIS, MN – November 6, 2012 – Administering autologous stem cells obtained from bone marrow either 3 or 7 days following a heart attack did not improve heart function six months later, reports a new clinical trial supported by the National Institutes of Health. The results of this trial, called TIME (Transplantation In Myocardial Infarction Evaluation), were presented by Jay Traverse, MD of the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation Tuesday, Nov. 6, at the 2012 Scientific Sessions of the American Heart Association in Los Angeles. The results of this trial mirror a previous, related study (LateTIME) which found that autologous bone marrow stem cell therapy given 2-3 weeks after a heart attack did not improve cardiac recovery. Both TIME and LateTIME were carried out by the Cardiovascular Cell Therapy Research Network (CCTRN), sponsored by the NIH’s National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. “The data presented by TIME do much to advance stem cell therapy research,” said Jay Traverse, MD of the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation and Principal Investigator of this study. “While this study did not provide a demonstrated cardiac benefit after six months, we still learned a great deal. Together, TIME and Late TIME have shown that stem cell therapy is safe, and they have set a baseline in terms of quantity of stem cells, type of stem cells, and severity of heart attack.” TIME enrolled 120 volunteers (avg. age 57) between July 2008 and February 2011; the participants all had moderate to severe impairment in their left ventricle and had undergone coronary stent placement as treatment for the heart attack. The participants were randomly assigned to one of four groups: day 3 stem cell, day 3 placebo (inactive cells), day 7 stem cell, or day 7 placebo. The CCTRN researchers developed a method of processing and purifying the stem cells from the bone marrow of each volunteer to ensure everyone received a uniform dose (150 million stem cells)...

2013 Shelton MacBook Guidelines for Students - Shelton School

• Review this document before taking possession of your MacBook. • The Apple MacBook, power adapter, case, stored data, on campus network and Internet access, and any services that will be issued are the sole property of the Shelton School & Evaluation Center. • The equipment listed is on loan to the student for the period designated on the last page. At the end of the loan period, or upon withdrawal from the school, all equipment must be returned in good working order. • These technologies are on loan to the student and must be used in accordance with all school policies, any applicable laws, and this document. Refer to the Shelton Acceptable Use Policy for Technology in the Parent Handbook. • These technologies are provided for educational and instructional purposes only and are intended to support the learning objectives of the school. • Students and their parents/guardians are responsible for cost of repair or replacement which will be assessed in the event of lost or damaged equipment. • Use of these technologies is a privilege and not a right. Equipment to be issued • Apple MacBook Air 13” • Apple MacBook Air Power adapter • STM Carrying Case (for MacBook Air) Ownership and Installation of Apps • Students are not allowed to install software on their computer without specific permission from the Shelton Technology Department and/or Administration. • Students and parents may purchase software and request that it be installed. Tech Support will require documentation of valid licensing and any license codes or account logins necessary to complete the installation. • Personally purchased software should be appropriate for school and conform to School Policy regarding content. (See the Shelton Acceptable Use Policy for Technology in Parent Handbook). Students/parents retain ownership of personally purchased software but should...

Associate Director Metro North Regional Employment Board Basic ...

Metro North Regional Employment Board Basic Function Provide overall professional support to the Executive Director and members of the Metro North Regional Employment Board; work with the Executive Director, Board of Directors, and REB members to develop and foster relationships with key stakeholders and to implement REB policies, programs, and initiatives. Assist in the development and implementation of the Metro North strategic plan. Conduct data analysis, research, and evaluation as needed to support workforce development efforts in priority industries. Develop service plans and budgets to ensure successful grant performance. Act as a technical resource to workforce partners and other staff as needed. Assist in or lead efforts to identify and build career pathway tools corresponding to priority industries. Opportunity for growth within the organization for candidate with the right mix of skills and experience. Specific Duties 1. Assist in the development of industry sector partnership groups based on priority industries as identified in the strategic plan; engage partner organizations (employers, training providers/community colleges, career centers, community-based organizations) in these groups; prepare materials, facilitate meetings and provide staff support to industry groups, including preparing meeting summaries. 2. With other REB staff, identify key workforce development issues and opportunities, and research creative approaches/best practices within workforce development nationally, but also across disciplines, with a goal of potentially testing and implementing innovative solutions to workforce development problems. 3. Conduct supporting research, develop and write grant proposals in response to state and federal Requests for Proposals/SGAs; identify and apply for foundation grants to support REB initiatives/industry partnership activities. 4. Develop programmatic plans and budgets to support grant submissions; implement, manage, and track program and budgetary performance of successful submissions. 5. Work closely and effectively with funding sources and with Metro North employers, ...

Meeting of the Metro-North Railroad Committee - MTA

Metropolitan Transportation Authority Meeting of the Metro-North Railroad Committee January 2014 Members J. Sedore, Chair F. Ferrer, MTA Vice Chairman J. Balian R. Bickford J. Blair N. Brown J. Kay S. Metzger C. Moerdler J. Molloy M. Pally A. Saul C. Wortendyke a Metropolitan Transportation Authority MEETING AGENDA METRO-NORTH RAILROAD COMMITTEE January 27,2014 - 8:30 a.m. 347 Madison Avenue Fifth Floor Board Room New York, NY AGENDA ITEMS PUBLIC COMMENTS PERIOD 1. Approval of Minutes - December 16, 2013 3 2. Approval of 2014 Work Plan 10 3. Procurements 16 • Non-Competitive 20 • Competitive 24 • Ratifications 32 4. President's Report • Safety 33 • • Operations 36 Financial 44 • • Ridership 67 Capital Program 78 5. MTA Police Report Date of next meeting: Monday, February 24,2014 at 8:30 AM 83 Minutes of the Regular Meeting Metro-North Committee Monday, December 16, 2013 Meeting Held at 347 Madison Avenue New York, New York 10017 8:30 a.m. The following members were present: Hon. Thomas F. Prendergast, Chairman & CEO, MTA Hon. Fernando Ferrer, Vice Chairman, MTA Hon. James L. Sedore, Jr., Co-Chaitman of the Committee Hon. Mitchell H. Pally, Co-Chairman of the Committee Hon. Andrew Albert Hon. Jonathan A. BalIan Hon. Robert C. Bickford Hon. James F. Blair Hon. Norman Brown Hon. Ira R. Greenberg Hon. Jeffrey A. Kay Hon. John J. Molloy Han. Susan G. Metzger Hon. Charles G. Moerdler Hon. David A. Paterson Han. Vincent Tessitore, Jr. Hon. Carl V. Wortendyke Not Present: Hon. Andrew M. Saul Also Present: Howard R. Pennut - President, Metro-North Railroad Helena Williams, President, Long T sland Rail Road Raymond Burney - Sr. Vice President, Administration Michael R. Coan - Chief, MfA Police Department Seth J. Cutnmins - Vice President and General Counsel Randall Fleischer - Senior Director, Business Development, Facilities and Marketing Anne Kirsch - Chief Safety and Security Officer Susan Doering - Vice President-Customer Service & Stations John Kesich- Acting Senior Vice President - Operations, Maintenance of Equipment Timothy McCarthy - Senior Director, Capital Programs Kim Porcelain - Vice President - Finance and Information Systems Michael Shiffer - Vice President - Operations Planning...

FINAL Deep Dive Report (S10-140310-003)[1] - Federal Railroad ...

On May 17, 2013, in Bridgeport, Connecticut, an accident occurred on Metro-North’s New Haven Line, when an eastbound Metro-North train of 8 cars, traveling 74 mph, derailed and came to rest on an adjacent track. Approximately 20 seconds later, a westbound Metro-North train on that adjacent track struck the derailed train. As a result of the accident, more than 50 people, some seriously injured, were hospitalized, rail operations were suspended, and millions in property damage occurred. • On May 28, 2013, a second accident occurred when a Metro-North train in West Haven, Connecticut, that was traveling 70 mph, struck and killed a Metro-North maintenance-ofway (MOW) employee who was part of a roadway work group performing railroad maintenance on a construction project. • On July 18, 2013, a third accident occurred when a CSX Transportation freight train derailed while traveling over Metro-North’s system. No one was injured, but property damage was significant. • On December 1, 2013, the fourth accident occurred when a Metro-North train of 7 cars traveling south from Poughkeepsie, New York, to Grand Central Terminal in New York City, derailed as it approached the Spuyten Duyvil Station. All cars derailed and the front cab came to rest close to the Harlem River. Four passengers were killed, and more than 70 were injured. Rail operations were suspended, and millions of dollars in property damage alone was sustained. On December 3, 2013, 2 days after the fourth and most serious of these accidents, FRA sent a letter to MTA expressing support for Governor Andrew Cuomo’s directive that MTA hold a safety stand-down, and directing Metro-North to implement a Confidential Close Call Reporting System (C3RS) (Appendix 2). Additionally, FRA issued Emergency Order 29 and Safety Advisory 2013-08. • Emergency Order 29, issued on December 6, 2013, required Metro-North to take immediate action to prevent excessive train speeds by identifying and prioritizing highrisk areas, modifying its existing signal system to ensure speed limits are obeyed, and 1 requiring a higher level of engagement and communication among operating crewmembers in areas in which major speed restrictions are in place. • Safety Advisory 2013-08, issued on December 10, 2013, urged railroads to provide additional training, increase the frequency of operational testing, and reinforced the importance of communication between crew members. The purpose was to ensure that all railroads adhere to Federal regulations and railroad operating rules regarding maximum authorized train speed limits. On December 16, 2013, FRA launched Operation Deep Dive, an assessment of Metro-North’s operations and safety compliance. More than 60 technical and human factor experts comprising 14 teams, conducted a 60-day comprehensive safety assessment of Metro-North. With assistance from the Federal Transit Administration, these experts reviewed and assessed Metro-North’s safety-related processes and procedures, its compliance with safety regulations and requirements, and its overall safety culture. In assessing Metro-North, the Deep Dive team evaluated:...

Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability ... - IPCC

ASSESSING AND MANAGING THE RISKS OF CLIMATE CHANGE Human interference with the climate system is occurring,1 and climate change poses risks for human and natural systems (Figure SPM.1). The assessment of impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability in the Working Group II contribution to the IPCC’s Fifth Assessment Report (WGII AR5) evaluates how patterns of risks and potential benefits are shifting due to climate change. It considers how impacts and risks related to climate change can be reduced and managed through adaptation and mitigation. The report assesses needs, options, opportunities, constraints, resilience, limits, and other aspects associated with adaptation. Climate change involves complex interactions and changing likelihoods of diverse impacts. A focus on risk, which is new in this report, supports decision-making in the context of climate change, and complements other elements of the report. People and societies may perceive or rank risks and potential benefits differently, given diverse values and goals. Compared to past WGII reports, the WGII AR5 assesses a substantially larger knowledge base of relevant scientific, technical, and socioeconomic literature. Increased literature has facilitated comprehensive assessment across a broader set of topics and sectors, with expanded coverage of human systems, adaptation, and the ocean. See Background Box SPM.1.2 Section A of this summary characterizes observed impacts, vulnerability and exposure, and adaptive responses to date. Section B examines future risks and potential benefits. Section C considers principles for effective adaptation and the broader interactions among adaptation, mitigation, and sustainable development. Background Box SPM.2 defines central concepts, and Background Box SPM.3 introduces terms used to convey the degree of certainty in key findings. Chapter references in brackets and in footnotes indicate support for findings, figures, and tables. Figure SPM.1: Illustration of the core concepts of the WGII AR5. Risk of climate-related impacts results from the interaction of climate-related hazards (including hazardou...

European and Global Climate Change Projections - ClimateCost

2.4°C to 3.4°C rise in global temperature by the period 2071-2100 (A1B)1 • nalysis of the future impacts and economic costs of climate change A requires climate models. These models require inputs of future greenhouse gas emissions, based on modelled global socio-economic scenarios, to make projections of future changes in temperature, precipitation and other meteorological variables. • he ClimateCost project has considered three emissions scenarios: T a medium-high non-mitigation baseline scenario (A1B); a mitigation scenario (E1), which stabilises global temperature change at about 2°C above pre-industrial levels; and a high-emission scenario (RCP8.5). • Under a medium-high emission baseline (A1B), with no mitigation, the climate models considered in ClimateCost show that global average temperatures could rise by between 1.6°C and 2.3°C by 2041-2070, and 2.4°C and 3.4°C by 2071-2100, relative to the modelled baseline period used in the project of 1961-1990. However, the models project much larger temperature increases for Europe in summer, and strong regional differences across countries, for example, the Iberian Peninsula has a mean projected increase of up to 5°C by 2071-2100. 1.5°C rise in global temperature with mitigation (E1)1 Uncertainty in the climate projections between emissions scenarios and climate models for Europe is considerable These values are reported for a future average time period over 30 years, relative to a 1961-1990 baseline. They report the Ensembles Project results used in the ClimateCost project, not the full IPCC AR4 range. 1 02/03 2/2 European and Global Climate Change Projections • The differences in the precipitation projections between the models are much greater and the distributional patterns across Europe are more pronounced than for temperature. Nonetheless, there are some robust patterns of change. There are wetter winters projected for Western and Northern Europe. By contrast, there are drier conditions projected all year for Southern Europe, where summer precipitation could be reduced by 50% by the end of the century. In other parts of Europe, the changes are more uncertain, and the models even project differences in the direction of change (i.e. whether increases or decreases will occur).

Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States (Report)

This report was produced by an advisory committee chartered under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, for the Subcommittee on Global Change Research, and at the request of the U.S. Government. Therefore, the report is in the public domain. Some materials used in the report are copyrighted and permission was granted to the U.S. government for their publication in this report. For subsequent uses that include such copyrighted materials, permission for reproduction must be sought from the copyright holder. In all cases, credit must be given for copyrighted materials. First published 2009 Printed in the United States of America A catalog record for this publication is available from the British Library. ISBN 978-0-521-14407-0 paperback Cambridge University Press has no responsibility for the persistence or accuracy of URLs for external or third-party Internet Web sites referred to in this publication and does not guarantee that any content on such Web sites is, or will remain, accurate or appropriate. Information regarding prices, travel timetables, and other factual information given in this work are correct at the time of first printing, but Cambridge University Press does not guarantee the accuracy of such information thereafter. Recommended Citation: Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States, Thomas R. Karl, Jerry M. Melillo, and Thomas C. Peterson, (eds.). Cambridge University Press, 2009.

Trails-End Scholarship enrollment form - Trail's End Popcorn

College Scholarship Enrollment Form Please submit this completed form to enroll or to report your 2013 sales. To enroll, you must sell at least $2,500 from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2013. SALE INFORMATION Spring 2013 Face-to-Face Sales (Take Order): $ ______________ Spring 2013 Show & Sell: $ ______________ Fall 2013 Take Order: $ ______________ Fall 2013 Show & Sell: $ ______________ 2013 Online Sales (sell.trails-end.com): $ ______________ 2013 Total Sales $ ____________________ SCOUT INFORMATION (to be completed by Scout) Scout's Full Name: _______________________________________ Qualifying Year: ____________ Birth Date: ______ / ______ / ______ Social Security # (last four digits – for account payout): XXX-XX-___ ___ ___ ___ Street Address ______________________________________________ State: _______ City: _________________________ Zip Code: ______________ Email Address (account balance will be emailed to you): ___________________________________________________ Council Name: _______________________________ Council City & State: ______________________________ COUNCIL APPROVAL (to be completed by Council) Council Popcorn Staff Advisor (print name): ___________________________________________ Council Popcorn Staff Advisor’s Signature: ___________________________________________ You must have your Council Popcorn Staff Advisor's signature to add sales HOW TO ENROLL OR REPORT SALES Please email the following documents to scholarship@trails-end.com. Trail’s End does not accept faxes, zipped files, or files over 10MB. This form may be submitted by the Scout or Council. 1. This completed form signed by your Council Popcorn Staff Advisor. 2. A copy of each paper order form used in the spring and/or fall sale. 3. A copy of your online sales report from sell.trails-end.com.

Finding The chinese language Interpreter

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