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Texting and Driving: Protecting Yourself From Distracted Driving

http://www.ntsi.com/ | In the age of cell phones, texting, and social media, distracted driving is now, more than ever, impacting drivers of all ages. And it isn’t just teen drivers who are using their phones while on the road; they are learning from older drivers who have taken to using their phones in the car. Protect yourself and your loved ones from distracted driving by attending online traffic school.

YOUR NAME - Boston College
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YOUR NAME yourname@bc.edu (no hyperlink/line), 617-656-0000 Your Boston College address here, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 Your home address here, Any Town, CA 01000 EDUCATION Boston College Chestnut Hill, MA College of Arts and Sciences (optional full, formal name of school you are in) Bachelor of Arts /Science in Major Minor (if you have one) anticipated May 200x GPA 3.xx (incl. GPA if > 3.00, do NOT round up) Honors/Awards: Dean’s List, Golden Key, AHANA Honor Roll Relevant courses (optional) (if applicable - no more than 4-5 upper level classes ) Abroad University, City, Country Studied (courses/subjects included) Spring Semester, 200x EXPERIENCE Name of Organization City, State Start date - end date Job title • Describe any accomplishments that you achieved at your job • Explain what you did, how you did it, why you did it, and what the results were • Whenever possible, quantify the number of people/items/data that you worked with ( Use present tense for verbs describing jobs that you are currently performing) Name of Organization City, State Start date - end date Job title • Describing Accomplishments: Result + Action + Problem/Project = good bullet point • Sample vague bullet point: Assisted with general upkeep and organization of homeless shelter • Sample good bullet points: Prepared and served meals to 50 homeless male residents; Maintained organization of supply closet and distributed resources to residents as needed; Acted as a liaison between program participants and staff members. VOLUNTEER EXPERIENCE and/or ACTIVITIES Name of first Organization City, State Start date - end date Title • Focus on a few key skills that your industry is looking for, and demonstrate how you used those skills through the description of the tasks/projects you accomplished at your job. Name of second Organization (brief description if necessary) City, State Start Date - end date Title • Remember to be consistent; punctuation at the end of the phrases is not necessary unless you are using paragraph formatting ACTIVITIES Section: List each organization (add an action verb phrase describing an acquired skill if you have space) SKILLS Computers: Microsoft Excel, PowerPoint, Word, and any other relevant computer skills or languages Language: List all languages you are fluent or proficient in or currently studying, if listed as fluent, should be able to conduct interview in that language. The resume samples included in this packet should be used as a starting point for visual models and general guidelines. Be sure to view all of the samples below for various styles/formats and resume tips. Please note that a small number of examples are show below. Each student is encouraged to construct a resume that fits his/her need.

How to Train Like the Kenyans Since the Kenyans dominate our ...

How to Train Like the Kenyans Since the Kenyans dominate our sport like no country has ever dominated any sport, what can we learn from them? While it’s true that a big reason they do so is their ability to train harder (which we’ll address), let’s first talk about things they do that allow them to reach their potential more than most – things that are practical and applicable for us in Kansas City. Workout Recovery 1) They prepare the body better for every workout with an extra slow warm up for the first 5-10 minutes: 5 minutes a mile or slower than 5K pace > the slower you begin each run, the more productive each run will become. 2) They help the body to recover better from every workout with an extra slow cool down for the last 5-10 minutes: 5 minutes a mile or slower than 5K pace > the less you stretch & do self massage (i.e. foam roll), the more you should cool down properly 3) They help the body recover better for the next hard workout by going extra slow on recovery runs: 2:30-4 minutes a mile slower than 5K pace > the easier you go on the easy days, the harder you’ll be able to go on the hard days In-Between Workouts Recovery They help the body recover better with: 1) fresh, seasonal, local real food > try to eat more food from the local farmer’s market – the less processed, the better 2) lots of sleep and non-active rest (i.e. lying down to get off their feet). 10 hours of sleep each night and 1-2 hours of napping > try to get more sleep and rest. 3) simplifying their life with very little distraction – no TV, computers, cell phones, iPads or other technological devices. Outside of basic things like washing their clothes and eating they’ll allow for reading or going for a walk,...

Fuel Cell Technology Market would be worth $2.5 Billion By 2018.

[246 Pages Report] Fuel Cell Technology Market Report categorizes the Global Market By Applications (Portable, Transport, Stationary), Types (Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell, Solid Oxide Fuel Cell, PAFC, MCFC), By Fuel (Natural Gas, Methanol, Hydrogen, Anaerobic Digester Gas) & by Geography. Fuel cell Technology market will grow from an estimated $629.8 million in 2013 to $2,543.1 million by 2018, with a CAGR of 32.2% from 2013 to 2018.

Cell therapy medical tourism: Time for action - Celltherapysociety.org

Department of Research and Development, Hospira Inc., Lake Forest, Illinois, USA, 2Department of Medical Ethics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, 3Advanced Centre for Biochemical Engineering, University College London, London, UK, 4The Stop ALD Foundation, Houston, Texas, USA, 5Interdisciplinary Oncology Program, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, Tampa, Florida, USA, 6Department of Regulatory Affairs, Perkin Elmer Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, 7Bone Marrow Transplantation Unit, National Cancer Institute, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 8Section of Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplantation Unit, University Hospital, Cremona, Italy, 9Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, 10Department of Cell and Molecular Therapies, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital RPA Hospital and Centenary Institute, Newtown, NSW Australia, 11Research Foundation for , Community Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, and 12Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA Key Words: cell therapy, stem cell, medical tourism, medical ethics, informed consent, regulatory affairs

Patient Advisory for Stem Cell Therapy and Medical Tourism

August 2013 Patient Advisory for Stem Cell Therapy and Medical Tourism As stakeholders in cellular therapy, the undersigned professional organizations believe it is necessary to share the following important message with patients and families contemplating cell therapy or experimental stem cell procedures. In this document, best practices are outlined to assist patients and family members in their healthcare decisions. Controlled innovation in the context of patient safety is paramount as potential therapeutic products or procedures are researched, tested, advanced and proven. Our organizations have received questions and concerns from patients and this document presents an opportunity to address them. Introduction Advancement of clinical therapies is best done in the setting of rigorous and formal clinical trials and in a structured regulatory framework. This helps assure that safety considerations, professional peer review, and the management of patient rights and obligations are considered and addressed. Some procedures would be considered standard of care, because scientific studies have shown that they are safe and effective. Not all procedures offered to patients in all regions of the world are tested in this manner and not all geographical regions have regulations for cellular therapies or patient protection. Additionally, it is possible that some practitioners may offer stem cell procedures without following the existing regulations. Patients may be seeking treatment for incurable, potentially untreatable diseases and may be susceptible to false promises or may not have access to all of the information needed to make this important decision. As patients and families contemplate voluntarily ...

Cardiac Stem Cell Therapy and the Promise of Heart Regeneration

Perspective Cardiac Stem Cell Therapy and the Promise of Heart Regeneration Jessica C. Garbern1 and Richard T. Lee2,* 1Department of Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA Stem Cell Institute, the Brigham Regenerative Medicine Center and the Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA *Correspondence: rlee@partners.org http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.stem.2013.05.008 2Harvard Stem cell therapy for cardiac disease is an exciting but highly controversial research area. Strategies such as cell transplantation and reprogramming have demonstrated both intriguing and sobering results. Yet as clinical trials proceed, our incomplete understanding of stem cell behavior is made evident by numerous unresolved matters, such as the mechanisms of cardiomyocyte turnover or the optimal therapeutic strategies to achieve clinical efficacy. In this Perspective, we consider how cardiac stem cell biology has led us into clinical trials, and we suggest that achieving true cardiac regeneration in patients may ultimately require resolution of critical controversies in experimental cardiac regeneration. Introduction The race is on: throughout the world, basic and clinical investigators want to be the first to identify new approaches to regenerate cardiac tissue and to prove the effects of these therapies in patients with heart disease. Despite substantial progress in treating many types of heart disease, the worldwide heart failure burden will remain enormous through this century. The potential of stem cells and the scope of the heart failure problem have fueled a stampede to be the first to achieve human heart regeneration. Cell transplantation approaches are attractive given their...

Stem Cell Therapy: the ethical issues - Nuffield Council on Bioethics

Stem Cell Therapy: the ethical issues a discussion paper Published by Nuffield Council on Bioethics 28 Bedford Square London WC1B 3EG Telephone: Fax: Email: Website: 020 7681 9619 020 7637 1712 bioethics@nuffieldfoundation.org http://www.nuffieldfoundation.org/bioethics April 2000 © Nuffield Council on Bioethics 2000 All rights reserved. Apart from fair dealing for the purpose of private study, research, criticism or review, no part of the publication may be produced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form, or by any means, without prior permission of the copyright owners. Nuffield Council on Bioethics Professor Ian Kennedy (Chairman) Professor Martin Bobrow CBE (Deputy Chairman) Professor Tom Baldwin Professor Sir Kenneth Calman KCB FRSE* Reverend Professor Duncan Forrester DD Professor Brian Heap CBE FRS Mrs Rebecca Howard Lady Hornby Professor John Ledingham Mr Derek Osborn CB Professor Catherine Peckham CBE Professor Martin Raff FRS Mr Nick Ross Professor Herbert Sewell Professor Albert Weale FBA * (co-opted member of Council for the period of his Chairmanship of the Working Party on the ethics of healthcare-related research in developing countries) The terms of reference are as follows: 1 to identify and define ethical questions raised by recent advances in biological and medical research in order to respond to, and to anticipate, public concern; 2 to make arrangements for examining and reporting on such questions with a view to promoting public understanding and discussion; this may lead, where needed, to the formulation of new guidelines by the appropriate regulatory or other body; 3 in the light of the outcome of its work, to publish reports; and to make representations, as the Council may judge appropriate. The Nuffield Council on Bioethics is funded jointly by the Medical Research Council, the Nuffield Foundation and the Wellcome Trust Attendees of the Round Table meeting on Stem Cell Therapy: the ethical issues Professor Martin Bobrow CBE, Department of Medical Genetics, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research and Deputy Chairman of Nuffield Council on Bioethics Professor Tom Baldwin, Department of Philosophy, University of York, member of Nuffield Council on Bioethics Lady Hornby, Chairman of The Kingwood Trust, member of Nuffield Council on Bioethics...

Stem cell therapy is helping horses with tendon and ... - Vet-Stem

Ultrasound is used to precisely guide the injection of adipose-derived stem cells into the suspensory ligament. The still-developing technology of stem cell therapy, which uses unspecified cells from the horse’s body, has the potential to help racehorses heal sounder than ever before. A tendon is a bundle of elastic fibers, mostly made of collagen, that attaches muscle to bone and helps move the skeleton. Ligaments are similar but attach bone to bone and provide stability. When a horse bows a tendon, it tears the fibers at a certain point of the tendon (the location results in a name, such as high or low bow), weakening it significantly. When the tendon begins to knit back together, it is significantly hampered by lack of blood flow. Blood provides several healing mechanisms, including adult stem cells, which are able to convert themselves into specific types of cells the body needs to heal itself (in this case, tendon cells). If the tendon does not get enough help, it eventually develops scar tissue, which weakens the tendon because it is nonelastic and haphazardly knitted together. The injury takes a long time to heal – a typical racetrack cure was pinfiring or blistering, followed by six months to a year of turnout. If a horse was brought back to the track and the tendon had mostly healed with scar tissue, the weakened tendon could give way and the injury recur.

Stem Cell Treatments For Cerebral Palsy Factsheet For - UCLA ...

STEM CELLS AND CEREBRAL PALSY Cerebral palsy (CP) is an umbrella term which includes several forms and levels of nonprogressive brain-related injury, which cause limitations in muscle control, movement and mobility (known as neuromotor impairment) and other symptoms that lead to physical disability. CP is caused by many factors, and can include infection before birth, premature birth and lack of oxygen around the time of birth. It is thought that the major common feature in CP is a lack of blood and oxygen to the brain during fetal development and/or delivery, known as a hypoxic-ischemic insult. The cells most vulnerable to this hypoxic-ischemic insult are oligodendrocytes, the support cells that wrap nerve cells (or neurons) with a protective white fat called myelin, hence the term white matter of the brain. Because of this myelin, neurons can send electrical signals efficiently throughout the body. Once oligodendrocytes die, the neurons are no longer protected and they eventually die. If myelin could be replaced before neurons die, neurons could be spared and motor impairments could be lessened. For this reason, scientists are investigating whether lost oligodendrocytes can be replaced with stem cells. Stem cells are unspecialized cells which can become specialized cells such as brain cells, heart cells or muscle cells. The process of developing into a specialized cell is known as differentiation. Stem cells can also multiply over and over again, a process known as proliferation. During the process of proliferation the stem cell either remains unspecialized or, under the right condition, can become a specialized cell such as a brain cell. Replacing neurons themselves would be like trying to rewire a giant switchboard with tens of thousands of ports but no labels, where improper connections could lead to pain. It is for this reason that the aim of many cell transplantation strategies now being tested is to replace lost oligodendrocytes rather than to make and successfully connect new neurons. Recent decades have seen advances in our knowledge of how to study and use stem cells. It is expected we will develop ways to transplant stem cells into damaged tissues to treat and cure injury and diseases like CP. From Mice to Humans...

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