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mathematics form 4 chapter 9 trigonometry

Chevrolet Performance - GM Powertrain Warranty Form

GM sells other engines and transmissions in various states of completion. This warranty covers only those engines and transmissions that are marketed by GM as GM Parts or Chevrolet Performance Parts. This warranty gives you specific legal rights, and you may also have other rights, which vary from state to state. General Motors does not authorize any person to create for it any other obligations or liability in connection with these assemblies. ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE APPLICABLE TO ASSEMBLIES OR PARTS IS LIMITED IN DURATION TO THE DURATION OF THIS WRITTEN WARRANTY. THE PERFORMANCE OF REPAIRS OR REPLACEMENT IS THE EXCLUSIVE REMEDY UNDER THIS WRITTEN WARRANTY OR ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY. GM SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES RESULTING FROM BREACH OF THIS WRITTEN WARRANTY OR ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY. Some states do not allow limitations on how long an implied warranty will last or the exclusion or limitation of incidental or consequential damages, therefore, the above limitation or exclusions may not apply to you. SERVICE CHECKS: Transmissions: It is important for you or a service technician to check the transmission/transaxle fluid level at regular intervals. Engines: It is important for you or a service technician to perform these underhood checks at each fuel fill: • Check engine oil level and add if necessary. • Check engine coolant level in coolant reservoir and add if necessary. • Check belts and hoses for visible wear and replace if necessary.

Excel 2007 - 2010 - Topaz Systems, Inc.

The Topaz MS Office Plug-In software allows users to electronically hand-sign an Excel spreadsheet using a Topaz signature pad and pen. Each embedded signature is bound solely to the content of the cells in the spreadsheet at the time it is signed so any changes made to the spreadsheet after signing renders the signature(s) invalid. If the file’s content is returned to the state it was when signed, then the signature will once again be valid. A signature is bound strictly to the cells in the sheet it is embedded in. Please note that form fields (such as drop down menus, radio buttons, etc.) are excluded from the binding process. Please make sure you first install the current version of SigPlus at this location: http://www.topazsystems.com/Software/download/sigplusactivex.htm Then, install the plug-in at this location: http://www.topazsystems.com/Software/download/plugins.htm If you open Excel and do not see the Add-Ins tab, click on the Office Button (File tab in Office 2010) > Excel Options > Add-Ins. At the bottom of the window, change the dropdown to Excel Add-ins and click Go. In the window that appears, you should see “Topaz Electronic Signatures” listed. Make sure it is checked. The signing window will then be displayed once the Sign Doc icon under the Add-Ins tab is clicked. Once the signing window is open, there are a number of options a user can choose:  The “Cancel” button will cancel the signature event.  The “Clear” button will clear any signature in the signature window, allowing the user to sign again.  The “Done” button will bind the signature to the spreadsheet’s cell content and then embed it into the spreadsheet.  The user can name the signature by using the specified field, “Signature Name:”, located below the buttons.  A time and date stamp can be toggled by choosing one of the “Stamp”/ ”No

Tags: Excel 2010, Arts,
Continental-Scale Governance Failure Will Hasten ... - Euan Ritchie

Continental-Scale Governance Failure Will Hasten Loss of Australia’s Biodiversity Euan G. Ritchie, Corey J. A. Bradshaw, Chris R. Dickman, Richard Hobbs, Christopher N. Johnson, Emma L Johnston, William F. Laurence, David Lindenmayer, Michael A. McCarthy, Dale G. Nimmo, Hugh H. Possingham, Robert L. Pressey, David M. Watson, John Woinarski Conserving biodiversity against a global backdrop of rapid environmental change poses one of the biggest and most important challenges to society. For this reason, systems of nature reserves have never been more important. Protected areas are under threat in many parts of the world (Mascia and Pailler 2011), but the weakening of protected areas in a rich, developed country with a global reputation for conservation leadership (Harrison 2006) is particularly alarming (Ritchie 2013). Consequently, we are concerned about the recent spate of substantial policy, legislative and management changes being made by three of six Australian state governments for exploitative uses of national parks—actions that could affect much of Australia and have significant negative effects on biodiversity. In recent decades, the Australian state and federal governments have collectively built a system of terrestrial and marine conservation reserves that aspires to be comprehensive and adequate, and to form the cornerstone of biodiversity conservation. The resulting national reserve system is imperfect, but goes some way toward protecting Australia’s unique species and ecosystems (Taylor et al. 2011). That system is now being systematically undermined, even while continental-scale biodiversity losses are underway.

consequences of large-scale, high-stakes testing on school

This chapter examines the consequences of high-stakes testing on the educational system. We focus on the effects of high-stakes tests on students, teachers, and principals because the evidence of these effects is comparatively strong. High-stakes testing may also affect parents (e.g., their attitudes toward education, their engagement with schools, and their direct participation in their child’s learning) as well as policymakers (their beliefs about system performance, their judgments about program effectiveness, and their allocation of resources). However, these issues remain largely unexamined in the literature. As a result, this chapter concentrates on the impact of large-scale, high-stakes testing on schools and classrooms and the adults and students who teach and learn in these environments.

Cisco Small Business SPA525G and SPA525G2 SIP IP Phones

Cisco SPA525G and Cisco SPA525G2 SIP IP Phone User Guide. 2. Contents .... describes the features as they function in factory default mode. Caring for Your ... Cisco Small Business SPA525G and SPA525G2 SIP IP Phones Contents Chapter 1: Getting Started 8 Overview 8 Caring for Your Phone Understanding Your Phone Lines and Buttons Softkey Buttons Using the Keypad and Buttons with Menus 10 10 13 16 Using Keypad Shortcuts 16 Using the Navigation Button 16 Entering Numbers and Text in Fields 16 Using Phone Hardware and Accessories 17 Using the Speakerphone 17 Using Wired and Wireless Headsets 17 Connecting the Headset 17 Connecting Bluetooth Headsets 18 Using a Headset with Your IP Phone 20 Switching Between the Handset/Headset/Speakerphone During a Call Using the Cisco Attendant Console Changing the Cisco SPA500DS Attendant Console Display Chapter 2: Installing Your Phone 20 21 21 23 Before You Begin 23 Connecting the Handset 24 (Optional) Attaching the Desk Stand 26 (Optional) Mounting the Phone to the Wall 26 Connecting the Power 27 Connecting Your Phone to the Network 27 Connecting Your Phone to the Wired Network 27 Connecting Your Phone to the Wireless Network 28 Determining Your Wireless Router Security Type Setting the Phone Wireless Connection 28 30 Using Wi-Fi Protected Setup 31 Manually Adding a Wireless Profile 32 Cisco SPA525G and Cisco SPA525G2 SIP IP Phone User Guide 2 Contents

Cisco Small Business 300 Series Managed Switches Administration ...

STEP 2 Enter the IP address of the device you are configuring in the address bar on the ... The default username is cisco and the default password is cisco. Cisco Small Business 300 Series Managed Switch Administration Guide Release 1.3.5 Contents Table of Contents Chapter 1: Getting Started 1 Starting the Web-based Configuration Utility 1 Quick Start Device Configuration 4 Interface Naming Conventions 5 /Window Navigation 7 Chapter 2: Status and Statistics 11 System Summary 11 Viewing Ethernet Interfaces 11 Viewing Etherlike Statistics 13 Viewing 802.1X EAP Statistics 14 Health 15 Managing RMON 15 View Log 23 Chapter 3: Administration: System Log 24 Setting System Log Settings 24 Setting Remote Logging Settings 26 Viewing Memory Logs 28 Chapter 4: Administration: File Management 30 System Files 30 Upgrade/Backup Firmware/Language 33 Download/Backup Configuration/Log 37 Configuration Files Properties 42 Copy/Save Configuration 43 Auto Configuration via DHCP 44 Cisco Small Business 300 Series Managed Switch Administration Guide

Microsoft PowerPoint tutorial
by guest0111 0 Comments favorite 27 Viewed Download 0 Times

Introduce you to a powerful software tool in order to create clear and meaningful presentations Importance: Microsoft PowerPoint has basically become the industry standard for giving presentations. You will need to become proficient in it during the NASA RISE program in order to give weekly presentations on scientists of color, and a final presentation on the research project that you will be working on. What to hand in: N/A Goals: After this activity, you will be able to: • • • Software: Effectively organize a presentation Create aesthetically pleasing slides Insert images and charts Microsoft PowerPoint SECTION 0: PREPARING FOR A PRESENTATION: Why do we give presentations: The scientific world revolves around sharing information. This can be done in written, graphic, or verbal form. It is ULTRA important that you be able to communicate in all forms. This can make or break your career. You need to understand the factors that influence your preparation. Your purpose, the audience, and the context in which you are to deliver your presentation should determine the content, organization, tone, and the mediums (slides, video, etc...) you use. Figure 1: Factors Affecting Presentation Planning What is critical for success in a good presentation? Good content - If your presentation has the right content, you are half way to making a great presentation. The ability to include the correct content is a strong function: • • How well you know your audience How your presentation is organized. Is it logical? Interest - Is the content worthy of the audience's time? • It is easier to give a presentation to 5 interested people than to 100 people who are bored stiff. Make sure you have targeted the correct audience to avoid this situation. • Even if you "peg" your audience correctly the first time, you should make sure you emphasize the reason(s) why your presentation is important. Clarity - Your ability to explain clearly with words, text, and graphics determines how clearly your message comes across. • Use your storyboard (you will learn about this in a few sections below) to ...

Microsoft PowerPoint 2013 Step by Step ebook - PDFiles.COM

PUBLISHED BY Microsoft Press A Division of Microsoft Corporation One Microsoft Way Redmond, Washington 98052-6399 Copyright © 2013 by Joyce Cox and Joan Lambert All rights reserved. No part of the contents of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without the written permission of the publisher. Library of Congress Control Number: 2012956092 ISBN: 978-0-7356-6910-9 Printed and bound in the United States of America. First Printing Microsoft Press books are available through booksellers and distributors worldwide. If you need support related to this book, email Microsoft Press Book Support at mspinput@microsoft.com. Please tell us what you think of this book at http://www.microsoft.com/learning/booksurvey. Microsoft and the trademarks listed at http://www.microsoft.com/about/legal/en/us/IntellectualProperty/ Trademarks/EN-US.aspx are trademarks of the Microsoft group of companies. All other marks are property of their respective owners. Native plant photographs courtesy of Rugged Country Plants, which is no longer open to the public. The example companies, organizations, products, domain names, email addresses, logos, people, places, and events depicted herein are fictitious. No association with any real company, organization, product, domain name, email address, logo, person, place, or event is intended or should be inferred. This book expresses the author’s views and opinions. The information contained in this book is provided without any express, statutory, or implied warranties. Neither the authors, Microsoft Corporation, nor its resellers, or distributors will be held liable for any damages caused or alleged to be caused either directly or indirectly by this book. Acquisitions Editor: Rosemary Caperton Editorial Production: Online Training Solutions, Inc. Technical Reviewer: Rob Carr Copyeditor: Jaime Odell Indexer: Joyce Cox Cover: Microsoft Press Brand Team

PowerPoint 2013.pdf
by guest0111 0 Comments favorite 22 Viewed Download 0 Times

© 2010 by CustomGuide, Inc. 3387 Brownlow Avenue, Suite 200; Saint Louis Park, MN 55426 This material is copyrighted and all rights are reserved by CustomGuide, Inc. No part of this publication may be reproduced, transmitted, transcribed, stored in a retrieval system, or translated into any language or computer language, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, magnetic, optical, chemical, manual, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of CustomGuide, Inc. We make a sincere effort to ensure the accuracy of the material described herein; however, CustomGuide makes no warranty, expressed or implied, with respect to the quality, correctness, reliability, accuracy, or freedom from error of this document or the products it describes. Data used in examples and sample data files are intended to be fictional. Any resemblance to real persons or companies is entirely coincidental. The names of software products referred to in this manual are claimed as trademarks of their respective companies. CustomGuide is a registered trademark of CustomGuide, Inc.

POWERPOINT BEYOND THE BASICS Making interactive, non ...

In the first PowerPoint tutorial you learned how to create and save a new presentation (the Screenbeans slide show). You saw a sample slide show (The Tudor Monarchs). You learned how to prepare an outline, you typed text for each slide, added clip art, and set timings. You added an effect to enhance the slide transition, you selected a color scheme, and may have even created a new background effect. You changed the printer settings so that you can print out handouts rather than just individual slides of your shows. For many classrooms and for most K-12 students, what you learned in chapter 9 is just fine; it’s all you need to know. But, if you're ready to take the next step and learn some more advanced skills with PowerPoint, or if you teach computer-savvy students who want more challenging skills to master, this chapter's for you. Most PowerPoint presentations you see in school or at work are what are called linear presentations. That is, each slide is designed to proceed one slide right after another. The first slide transitions to the second, which transitions to the third, and so forth. For many educational tasks, this is fine. But, what if... What if you want your students to create an interactive story, where, for example, younger kids could read on Slide One a story about a dragon, then choose, on Slide Two, any one of three possible places that the dragon could go? By clicking on the word "desert," the show would move to a slide describing what happens to the dragon in the desert. If the student clicks on the word "forest," a different slide sequence appears with another ending. The learner thus participates, not by simply clicking on slide after slide in one, linear direction, but by making choices that affect what slide comes next, thus making the presentation interactive and non-linear.

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