SEARCH

Found 885 related files. Current in page 18

japan incest story

Hydroponic Farm Tour Guide - CuisinArt Resort & Spa

Hydroponic Farm Tour Guide by Dr. Howard Resh 1930s, as he developed techniques to commercially produce crops without soil. His first practical application of hydroponics was during World War II in an effort to grow fresh vegetables on non-arable islands where troops were stationed. Installations were established on Ascension Island in the South Atlantic, Iwo Jima and Okinawa in the South Pacific, and later, on Wake Island and a 22-hectare Hydroponics means “water working”. Therefore, a Chofu, Japan after the true hydroponic culture is one that uses water only, War. The U.S. Army, with plant nutrients added in the correct concentra- with its own special hy- tions and ratios for the plants grown. In most cases, droponics branch, grew project at hydroponic culture involves a substrate for the plant over 8,000,000 pounds of fresh produce during 1952. roots to grow in, and is consequently termed hydroponic vegetables produced in Canada, and over “soilless culture”. 1000 acres in the U.S. Principal crops grown are toma- toes, cucumbers, peppers and lettuce. Hydroponics goes back as far as the famous hanging gardens of Babylon and the floating gardens of the Aztecs. From the early 1600s until the 1800s, “nutriculture” techniques were developed for the growing of plants in laboratories to study plant nutrition. Dr. William F. Gericke of the University of California coined the term “hydroponics” in the early Today, there are about 1500 acres of greenhouse Objectives of the CuisinArt Resort & Spa Hydroponic Farm The resort, which is located on Anguilla, a small Caribbean island, must import all of its fruits and vegetables, along with all other food, from North America or Europe via St. Maarten. This is not a problem with processed foods,...

Web design services – The big story

Hire Magento developers. : To get a complete quote for your Magento eCommerce Development & Magento Website Design contact us at info@bluesharksolution.com.

GRAND CENTRAL GRAND CENTENNIAL - Grand Central Terminal

GRAND CENTRAL GRAND CENTENNIAL SPRING/SUMMER 2013 THE CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION CONTINUES The Official Self-Guided Grand Central Audio Tour, presented by Metro-North and Orpheo USA, explores the Terminal’s architecture, little known secrets, and storied history. Take the tour and see Grand Central through new eyes. The Audio Tour is available 9 am - 6 pm at specially-marked windows in the Main Concourse: $7 for adults, $6 for seniors and the disabled, $5 for students and children. The self-guided tour can be taken in as little as 30 minutes and is available in English, French, Spanish,Japanese, Italian and German. The Official MTA Metro-North Grand Central guided tour, presented by The Municipal Arts Society, explores the Terminal’s state-of-the-art design and construction. The 75-minute tour is led by an expert docent and departs daily from the Main Concourse at 12:30pm. To purchase tickets visit the tour window located on the Main Concourse: $20 for adults, $15 for seniors, students, children under 10, military and MAS Members (proper ID required). Group sales and private tours are also available. Visit www.mas.org/tours for more information. an architectural masterpiece and a New York City icon — saved, restored and adapted to serve the 21st century and beyond. The Centennial celebrates this story and, in the process, deepens the appreciation and affinity visitors and Metro-North Railroad customers alike have for this magnificent landmark. The world sees the Terminal through one hundred years of American history and is offered a glimpse of how it will serve the city for one hundred more. It draws attention to the Terminal’s majesty and captures the spirit, energy and stories of the people who pass through it. Howard Permut, President, MTA Metro-North Railroad Peter Stangl, Chair, Centennial Committee Randall J. Fleischer, Vice President, Grand Central Terminal and Corporate Development, MTA Metro-North Railroad Gabrielle Shubert, Director, New York Transit Museum Join us for a free, family-friendly weekend filled with an extraordinary assembly of historic train cars, a model train collectible show, and fun activities at “Kid Junction,” sure to appeal to railroad enthusiasts of all ages...

Psychological Impacts of Global Climate Change - American ...

The Psychological Impacts of Global Climate Change An appreciation of the psychological impacts of global climate change entails recognizing the complexity and multiple meanings associated with climate change; situating impacts within other social, technological, and ecological transitions; and recognizing mediators and moderators of impacts. This article describes three classes of psychological impacts: direct (e.g., acute or traumatic effects of extreme weather events and a changed environment); indirect (e.g., threats to emotional well-being based on observation of impacts and concern or uncertainty about future risks); and psychosocial (e.g., chronic social and community effects of heat, drought, migrations, and climate-related conflicts, and postdisaster adjustment). Responses include providing psychological interventions in the wake of acute impacts and reducing the vulnerabilities contributing to their severity; promoting emotional resiliency and empowerment in the context of indirect impacts; and acting at systems and policy levels to address broad psychosocial impacts. The challenge of climate change calls for increased ecological literacy, a widened ethical responsibility, investigations into a range of psychological and social adaptations, and an allocation of resources and training to improve psychologists’ competency in addressing climate change–related impacts. Keywords: climate change, psychological impacts, disaster psychology, psychological adaptation The full story of climate change is the unfolding story of an idea and how this idea is changing the way we think, feel, and act. (Hulme, 2009, p. xxviii) Global climate change is likely to have significant negative effects on mental health and well-being, effects that will be felt most by vulnerable populations and those with preexisting serious mental illness Localized and/or immediate consequences, such as injury or stress resulting from more extreme weather events or degraded landscapes, may be perceived as direct, personal impacts of climate change (Kolbert, 2006). However, for many, the psychological effects of climate change are likely to be gradual, cumulative, and/or experienced only through media and social communication (see Weber & Stern, 2011, this issue, and Reser & Swim, 2011, this issue). An appreciation of psychological impacts entails recognizing multiple meanings and cultural narratives associated with climate change ena, such as increased population, urbanization, and disparities in wealth (Kazdin, 2009, p. 342; Stokols, Misra, Runnerstrom, & Hipp, 2009). The concept of climate change assumes a progression of extreme weather and environmental changes at an unprecedented rate and scale...

Global climate change and health: an old story writ large pdf, 115kb

Global climate change and health: an old story writ large Climate change poses a major, and largely unfamiliar, challenge. This publication describes the process of global climate change, its current and future impacts on human health, and how our societies can lessen those adverse impacts, via adaptation strategies and by reducing greenhouse gas emissions.Today, humankind’s activities are altering the world’s climate. We are increasing the atmospheric concentration of energy-trapping gases, thereby amplifying the natural "greenhouse effect" that makes the Earth habitable. These greenhouse gases (GHGs) comprise, principally, carbon dioxide (mostly from fossil fuel combustion and forest burning), plus other heat-trapping gases such as methane (from irrigated agriculture, animal husbandry and oil extraction), nitrous oxide and various human-made halocarbons. In its Third Assessment Report (2001), the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) stated: "There is new and stronger evidence that most of the warming observed over the last 50 years is attributable to human activities."1 The global scale of climate change differs fundamentally from the many other familiar environmental concerns that refer to localised toxicological or microbiological hazards. Indeed, climate change signifies that, today, we are altering Earth’s biophysical and ecological systems at the planetary scale – as is also evidenced by stratospheric ozone depletion, accelerating biodiversity losses, stresses on terrestrial and marine foodproducing systems, depletion of freshwater supplies, and the global dissemination of persistent organic pollutants...

Minimalist Shoes Review - She Runs She Writes

Minimalism is getting big! The RF team round-up and try out some of the latest offerings Until recently minimalism was a term reserved for trendy homes. But in 2011, minimalism provided an answer to shoe manufacturers faced with the conundrum of making shoes for those who don't want them – the new 'barefoot' running community. The truth is minimalist, stripped-down, lightweight shoes aren't new and neither is barefoot running – remember Zola Budd! In the new minimalist category you'll find transitional shoes, which help you get used to less (not unlike racer trainers). But even manufacturers are aware of the shortcomings of providing lightweight shoes to the mass market, and many are selling them with 'education' as part of the package (i.e. you need to get used to these shoes, and get strong, before switching over). Here, the RF team test out the latest lightweight shoes. Read more reviews at our editor's blog"A lightweight shoe that rides close to the ground. A selling point is that these shoes keep you cool. A "minimalist upper lets air flow from all angles due to ClimaCool® material." The unique sole makes this comfortable shoe very flexible. The CC Ride is miCoach (www.micoach.com) compatible." "With very similar features to the women's version above, this 'C' graded shoe is for the occasional runner. Again not tested by RF, the shoe is described as a lightweight shoe with XDR foam for comfort, mesh upper for breathability and a rounded heel for improved rear to forefoot transition." Brooks pureproject Connect, £90, www.brooksrunning.co.uk "Super flexible shoe with "toe flex" for easier lift-off, an "ideal heel" to help you land further forward, a nav-bar to protect the mid foot, and Brooks BioMoGo DNA which blends into the entire sole, making it thin and adaptive. Connect give the lightest ride of the range. To be launched in October 2011." "An anatomical last is designed for a woman’s foot, providing optimal fit. Ecco Biom offer a tier system on the sole from A through to C, with A being for the serious runner and C the less serious. A yak leather upper is combined with the patented ion-mask™ treatment for durability." Not tested by RF. "Weighing at just 209g for men and 179g for women (Diva), these lightweight racing shoes from Japan are made with Asics' renowned Duosole for superb grip and responsiveness. They’re supposed to be worn for shorter races, but I wore them for the marathon. I felt I got support and a light ride..."

PM Plus: Purple: The Running Shoes - HMH School

STORY BOOKS LEVEL 20 Running words: 519 Many children enjoy the challenge of cross-country racing. In this story, Alex (who has been met in other Rigby PM Plus books) is no exception. She also proves that it takes more than a new pair of running shoes to win a race! Have students use a story board or story map to illustrate the story in four steps. They may label each illustration in words, phrases, or sentences, or they may dictate to teacher. Creating the atmosphere Discuss occasions when special shoes are often worn, e.g., at a party, at school, for sport, etc. Alternatively, reread The cross-country race. Focusing on the story • Cover Read the title and discuss the cover and title page illustrations. Recall other stories about Alex. • Pages 2–5 Talk about preparing for a sports event. Study the girls’ body language. Discuss Olivia’s expectation that she will win! • Pages 6–9 Talk about Alex’s reasons for wanting her dad to watch the race. Encourage children to express their own thoughts about the advice he gives to Alex. • Pages 10–13 Discuss Alex’s decision to “wait for the right moment.” The text fosters logical reasoning. Encourage children to predict what might happen next. • Pages 14–16 Check predictions. After children have read the text, ask them to explain why Alex has decided to keep her old shoes. Write “new is not always best” on a chart and discuss what this means. Exploring language features • On a chart, write “Some of the fastest runners in the world don’t wear shoes at all,” and “My dad says the best runners have the best shoes.” In pairs or small groups, have children discuss both sentences and report back to the class. • Discuss vocabulary that relates to time, e.g., the following week, weekend, afternoon, next week, and this year...

INTERIOR DESIGN - Bergen Community College

INTERIOR DESIGN INTERIOR DESIGN PROGRAM Interior design is one of the fastest growing professions. Interior designers engage both public and private spaces. An interior environment serves the needs and requirements of the users and provides a sense of space for individual and group activity. Our Interior Design Certificate Program will train and assist you in career advancement, career change or personal and professional enrichment. Bring the art of decorating into your home or office. A certificate of completion is awarded to students who successfully complete any one course, some of which require final projects. To be eligible for the Certificate in Interior Design, students must successfully complete eight core courses. Those students that complete this program will have the opportunity to shop and use the Decorator’s Exchange in River Edge with a discount. Space is limited. Please register early. This certificate program can be completed for under $3,000 in just two semesters. Interior Design Information Session Tuesday, January 24, 2012, 6:30 p.m. at the Moses Family Meeting & Training Center, TEC-128A To be eligible for the Interior Design Certificate, students must successfully complete the following eight core courses. Anyone may take an elective or core course for their own enjoyment without being part of the certificate program. This course will provide an exciting Introduction or refresher in the principles of good lighting design. Learn practical information on lamps, fixtures, controls, as well as new developments in lighting technology, including fiber optics and LED’s. Under the supervision of an award-winning lighting designer, learn to develop usable lighting plans and specifications and resolve specific residential lighting challenges for bath, kitchens, home offices, and multi-story foyers. Each class will culminate in a specific lighting design problem where the class, working in small groups, solves the problem with the instructor’s guidance. Students are provided lamp and fixture catalogs and many other useful handouts. This course will be offered once per year. Instructor: Stephen E. Lohm, LEED-AP, LC, IES CD 349 Interior Materials, Finishes & Sources 10 sessions; $345 001, Mon.; February 27-April 30, 2012 Hours: 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Location: TEC-119 Study materials and sources used in interior design with a focus on their characteristics, performance criteria, fabrication, and installation methods. Guest lecturers from manufacturers and a field trip are included in this course. Topics include: floors, walls, ceilings; moldings, doors, and windows; cabinet construction; kitchen and bathroom planning...

Harry Potter and His Critics - Grace Presbyterian Church

COVENANT THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY ONLINE RESOURCES A Heaven’s Eye View of Christmas The Harry Potter books are an extraordinary success story in the publishing world. Over the past few years they have aroused much interest and excitement not only in the original English language editions, but also around the world as they have been translated into many other languages. Their translation into Chinese was reported to be the biggest publishing event in China’s history. The Harry Potter books strike a chord with both children and adults, and the Harry Potter movie has recently been released to packed theaters. The fourth book in the series had an initial print run in the U.S. of 3.8 million copies, 40 times as many as an average bestseller. The fifth book is scheduled to be released in 2002. As well as being extraordinarily popular, the books have encouraged millions of children to start reading for the first time. Many parents are delighted to see their children eagerly reading these stories, and then moving on to read other books as well. I have entitled this presentation “Harry Potter and His Critics.” As I address the critics’ estimation of these books, I desire to challenge their assumptions and encourage recognition of the value of the Harry Potter books. There have been passionate attacks on the Harry Potter series by many people and in particular by Christians. This has occurred especially in the United States — much more than in Britain or other places. In the U.S., Christians on the radio, in magazine articles, on television, on web sites, and in a growing number of books, have attacked this series very strongly. There are Christian schools where the books have been banned. I have had several telephone calls from confused parents saying, “My children love these books, I love these books — what is going on?” The first of the books introduces a little boy who discovers that he was born with magical powers. He subsequently goes off to a school for wizards called Hogwarts, where he learns to develop his gifts. Simply because the books bring readers into an imaginary world of magic and wizards, many Christians say they teach occult practice. This is the primary reason Christians attack these books. The second criticism leveled is that the books teach a rebellious attitude against authority. Critics cite the way Harry sometimes responds to his uncle and aunt who are raising him as proof of this — though it has to be said that the uncle and aunt treat him very poorly (to say the least, for they are abominably cruel guardians). Thirdly, there are many Christians who simply say that fantasy is dangerous, and that to present this kind of fantasy world to children is automatically hazardous to them. Rather than simply accepting such criticisms, as Christians who are called to be salt and light in our society Harry Potter and His Critics we have a responsibility to encourage discernment with regard to these popular books. If we have children who are eager to read the books or if as adults we are interested, we must sift through the above criticisms and be prepared to think about J.K. Rowling’s stories using the wisdom that God has given us — attempting to avoid suspicion against something merely because it is popular. Then, with a sensitive issue such as this, we each ought humbly to exercise discernment in deciding what is best for our families and for ourselves...

Harry Potter and the Holocaust - Center for Jewish Studies

Course Name: Harry Potter and the Holocaust: Collective Memory and Alternative Ways of Talking about Racism and Genocide What is collective memory? And what is the difference between symbol, image, and icon? How do inadvertent visual descriptions compare to direct statements when it comes to speaking to children, adolescents, and even adults about the holocaust? The course will compare the treatment of the holocaust, racism and genocide in books such as Night, The Diary of Anne-Frank and Maus: A Survivor's Tale with a more general discussion of violence and racism in books such as The Wave, Animal Farm, and Lord of the Flies (as well as Shirley Jackson's short story, "The Lottery.") The main texts for this course will be two books out of the Harry Potter series (The Goblet of Fire and The Deathly Hallows), a series which has been intended for children, and which makes almost no mention of historical events and identity while speaking of purity of blood, racial violence and (eventually) state-run racial persecution. Grades Most of the articles and primary texts for this course will be posted on the course website. Please Note: The readings from most primary texts will be reduced to short excerpts in order to comply with fair usage, and to maintain a reasonable reading requirement. Students are expected to purchase and read the following two books: Rowling, J. K. (2010). Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire [Paperback]. London: Bloomsbury. ——. (2011). Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows [Paperback]. London: Bloomsbury. Course Assignments Participation and Attendance – Class discussion will more often consist of active discussion and various activities than class lecture. Students are therefore expected to come to class prepared and ready to participate. Attendance will be monitored, and each three unexcused absences will count for half a grade off the final grade in the course (e.g. from A to A-). Nine unexcused absences will result in a failing course grade. Students who need to miss a class for a legitimate reason should send an email message to the instructor ahead of time. Weekly assignments – Students will be asked to prepare weekly assignments, often creative and in groups. These assignments will address reading and/or class discussions. Written Assignment – There will be a few (three of four) short individual written assignments. In these assignments students will usually be asked to respond to a short text or an article we will later discuss in class. Midterm and Final Paper – Each student will choose, in consultation with the instructor, a paper topic that addresses some of the topics and texts that are discussed in class. The midterm paper will be submitted and returned with a midterm grade and some feedback – and then revised and resubmitted at the end of the course (hopefully) for a higher grade. Each of the two grades (for the midterm and final paper) represents 30% of the final grade in the course...

 141516171819202122