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App Gamenet launches new proposals for Casino Mobile developed by Game360

Gamenet launches two new proposals for mobile casino realized in collaboration with Game360 the market leader software provider for online and mobile gaming in Italy. The two new apps are available for iOS and Android, one is dedicated to table games, the other one includes several slots for smartphones and tablets.

18SP666 – MBE 900 Pilot Bearing Bolt Service Kit (P/N ... - DDCSN

New flanged multi-point socket head bolts have been released to prevent the MBE 900 pilot bearing from walking out of the flywheel housing. The new bolts will replace two flywheel bolts, located 180 degrees from one another. KIT CONTENTS The MBE 900 Pilot Bearing Bolt Service Kit P/N: A9269900105, consists of the following parts, listed in Table 1: Part No. A9269900005 18SP666 Table 1 Qty. 2 1 Description Flanged Multi-point Socket Head Bolts Installation Instructions MBE 900 Pilot Bearing Retaining Bolt Service Kit (P/N: A9269900105) INSTALLATION PROCEDURE Use the following procedure to install the new flanged multi-point socket bolts: 1. Shut off engine and apply the parking brake, chock the wheels, disconnect vehicle battery power, and perform any other applicable safety steps. 2. Remove the transmission. 3. Remove clutch from flywheel. 4. Pull the crankshaft position sensor out of the flywheel housing about 8 mm (0.32 in.). 5. Remove the end cover from the flywheel housing and install the engine barring tool (J-46392). Tighten the bolts on the barring device to 25 N·m (18 lb·ft). Insert the locking pin to block the device and prevent it from rotating. 6. Using J-46385, the flywheel and main pulley socket tool, remove two flywheel multi-point socket head bolts from the flywheel, 180 degrees apart. See Figure 1.

What causes abdominal pain? - American College of Gastroenterology

What is abdominal pain? Ordinarily, we are unaware of any of the actions of the organs in the abdomen or any discomfort from activities such as eating, movement of food through the intestines, or bowel movements. Nerves are constantly monitoring activities in the body, and when those messages are transmitted to the brain and come into consciousness as unpleasant sensations, we may sense pain or discomfort. What causes abdominal pain? Pain can arise from any of the structures within the abdomen or the abdominal wall. In addition, pain messages originating in the chest, back, or pelvis can sometimes be perceived as coming from the abdomen. For example, patients with heart attacks or pneumonia sometimes complain of upper abdominal pain rather than chest pain. There are many possible causes of pain. The table shows some of the more common causes of pain: Non-abdominal causes: Pneumonia (lung infection) Myocardial infarction (heart attack) Pleurisy (irritation of the lining around the lungs) Pulmonary embolism (blood clots to the lungs) Abdominal or chest wall pain: Shingles (herpes zoster infection) Costochondritis (inflammation of the rib cartilages) Injury (blunt trauma, muscle pulls) Nerve irritation (neuropathy) Hernias (protrusions of structures through the abdominal wall) Scars © The American College of Gastroenterology 6400 Goldsboro Rd., Suite 450, Bethesda, MD 20817 P: 301-263-9000 F: 301-263-9025 Internet: www.acg.gi.org

packaging design as resource for the construction of brand identity

Copyright © 2006 Ulrich R. Orth and Keven Malkewitz All rights reserved Ulrich R. Orth, Prof. Dr. habil. (primary contact) Agribusiness & Food Marketing Professor College of Business Oregon State University Bexell Hall 330, Corvallis, OR 97331-2603 Phone: (503) 678 1264, x44 Fax: (503) 678 5986 E-mail: ulrich.orth@oregonstate.edu Keven Malkewitz, PhD Assistant Professor of Marketing College of Business Oregon State University 410 Bexell Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331-2603 Phone: (541) 737 3688 E-mail: keven.malkewitz@bus.oregonstate.edu The authors wish to thank Andrea Marks, Jay Thompson, and Joseph Cote for their comments during this research, Cindy Lederer for providing access to the Oregon Consumer Panel and numerous professional designers for their input. Financial support and assistance in collecting the data was provided in part by Willamette Valley Vineyards, particularly Jim Bernau, Shelby Zadow, and Jon Mason. Please direct all inquiries to the first author.

Scalable SQL and NoSQL Data Stores - Rick Cattell Home Page

In this paper, we examine a number of SQL and socalled “NoSQL” data stores designed to scale simple OLTP-style application loads over many servers. Originally motivated by Web 2.0 applications, these systems are designed to scale to thousands or millions of users doing updates as well as reads, in contrast to traditional DBMSs and data warehouses. We contrast the new systems on their data model, consistency mechanisms, storage mechanisms, durability guarantees, availability, query support, and other dimensions. These systems typically sacrifice some of these dimensions, e.g. database-wide transaction consistency, in order to achieve others, e.g. higher availability and scalability. Note: Bibliographic references for systems are not listed, but URLs for more information can be found in the System References table at the end of this paper. Caveat: Statements in this paper are based on sources and documentation that may not be reliable, and the systems described are “moving targets,” so some statements may be incorrect. Verify through other sources before depending on information here. Nevertheless, we hope this comprehensive survey is useful! Check for future corrections on the author’s web site cattell.net/datastores. Disclosure: The author is on the technical advisory board of Schooner Technologies and has a consulting business advising on scalable databases.

Solving Data Integration Challenges with SQL and NoSQL - FOSE

Many organizations today would seemingly be content with having achieved an information architecture that features a broad-scope enterprise resource management environment feeding data in batch for reporting and analytics to a robust data warehouse environment. As a bonus, the data warehouses in this post-operational environment may consist of solid-state components and automated archival abilities. Irreversibly, the environment also has been inundated with data marts fed from original source and from the data warehouse itself. There is frequently a multidimensional database in the mix. Or a hundred. If there is any contentment with such an architecture, it will be short-lived. With information the “new gold” for companies, each shop must do everything it can to nurture, protect, make available and otherwise exploit the information asset. This will frequently mean venturing into new technology domains for the management of the asset. One may be tempted to consider the NoSQL movement as the epitome of these new technology domains. However, many possibilities have been laid on the table by the vendor community in the years prior to NoSQL. Most have merit in an enterprise today. We clearly need to get away from the winner-take-all mentality where every workload – sometimes whether it is analytical or operational – will be solved the same way as the last one. Frequently, that way was with a data integration operation with the data warehouse followed by the deployment of more reports in the business intelligence tool. Force-fitting a workload into a technology that it was not designed for creates more problems than it solves.

Will NoSQL Databases Live Up to Their Promise? - Leavitt ...

Organizations that collect large amounts of unstructured data are increasingly turning to nonrelational databases, now frequently called NoSQL databases. M any organizations collect vast amounts of customer, scientific, sales, and other data for future analysis. Traditionally, most of these organizations have stored structured data in relational databases for subsequent access and analysis. However, a growing number of developers and users have begun turning to various types of nonrelational—now frequently called NoSQL—databases. Nonrelationa l dat a ba ses— including hierarchical, graph, and object-oriented databases—have been around since the late 1960s. However, new types of NoSQL databases are being developed. And only now are they beginning to gain market traction. Different NoSQL databases take different approaches. What they have in common is that they’re not relational. Their primary advantage is that, unlike relational databases, they handle unstructured data such as word-processing files, e-mail, multimedia, and social media efficiently. They are also easier to work with for the many developers not familiar 12 r2tec.indd 12 computer with the structured query language. SQL is the programming language used for querying and updating relational databases. Some NoSQL databases can function in a distributed setting. Users could thus scale a single database by running it across additional inexpensive machines rather than by having to run it on a single more powerful and costly machine.

PostgreSQL as a Schemaless Database - The Build

PostgreSQL as a Schemaless Database. Christophe Pettus PostgreSQL Experts, Inc. OSCON 2013 Welcome! • I’m Christophe. • PostgreSQL person since 1997. • Consultant with PostgreSQL Experts, Inc. • cpettus@pgexperts.com • thebuild.com • @xof on Twitter. What’s on the menu? • What is a schemaless database? • How can you use PostgreSQL to store schemaless data? • How does do the various schemaless options perform? A note on NoSQL. • Worst. Term. Ever. • It’s true that all modern schemaless databases do not use SQL, but… • Neither did Postgres before it became PostgreSQL. (Remember QUEL?) • The defining characteristic is the lack of a fixed schema. Schematic. • A schema is a fixed (although mutable over time) definition of the data. • Database to schema (unfortunate term) to table to field/column/attribute. • Individual fields can be optional (NULL). • Adding new columns requires a schema change.

Wall Street Journal Reading Guide

How to access the Wall Street Journal Duke provides free access to WSJ articles through the library (see instructions below). Articles will be listed by date in a database. We recommend going to the WSJ website (www.wsj.com) first to identify which articles you would like to read in full. The public version of the WSJ website allows you to view news headlines and a brief description of all articles, without requiring an online subscription. The “Today’s Newspaper” tab provides the stories from that day’s front page, and each of the main sections, to help familiarize you with the layout of the print version. Guide to accessing the WSJ at Duke Libraries (need to be on Duke Network): 1. Go to the Duke Library website: http://library.duke.edu/ 2. In the catalog search box, select “Title” from the dropdown box and search “Wall Street Journal (online)”. The following page should appear: http://find.library.duke.edu/results.php?type=books&catalogsuggestions=is&catalogsou rce=duke&sourceid=homepage&searchtype=Title&query=wall+street+journal+%28onlin e%29 3. Select the first hit (Wall Street Journal (Eastern ed.: Online) by clicking on “getit@DUKE” which will take you to a different page: http://getitatduke.library.duke.edu/?sid=sersol&SS_jc=JC_001145597&title=Wall+Stree t+Journal+(online) 4. On the page above, click on third "link to Journal" on the left side of the page (1984 - present), and you'll go directly to the Wall Street Journal online. 5. Then the below page will appear and you can select a date and all the articles will appear separately: http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?RQT=318&pmid=117310 6. For Today’s article, click on “View most recent issue” at the top of the page. 7. You can search for the article you want, but it requires you to know the exact start of the headline, which sometimes changes. Quickest way to skim through the 125+ articles is to make sure you select to view 100 items per page (dropdown box at the bottom of the page), and select “Brief view” above the first article.

Download PDF - The Washington Institute for Near East Policy

Both Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, who founded Jamaat al-Tawhid wa-l-Jihad ( JTWJ) in 1999 (see Table 1 for the history of ISIS names), and al-Qaeda head Usama bin Laden came of age during the Afghan jihad against the Soviet Union in the 1980s, but their respective organizations have distinct genetic material, attributable in part to their different backgrounds, leadership styles, and aims. This is the case even though the two groups formed a marriage of convenience beginning in 2004. One key difference involves the socioeconomic background of the groups’ founders. Whereas bin Laden and his cadre grew up in at least the upper middle class and had a university education, Zarqawi and those closest to him came from poorer, less educated backgrounds. Zarqawi’s criminal past and extreme views on takf ir (accusing another Muslim of heresy and thereby justifying his killing) created major friction3 and distrust with bin Laden when the two first met in Afghanistan in 1999.

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