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Long-Term Health Risks and Benefits Associated with Spay / Neuter ...

At some point, most of us with an interest in dogs will have to consider whether or not to spay / neuter our pet. Tradition holds that the benefits of doing so at an early age outweigh the risks. Often, tradition holds sway in the decision-making process even after countervailing evidence has accumulated. Ms Sanborn has reviewed the veterinary medical literature in an exhaustive and scholarly treatise, attempting to unravel the complexities of the subject. More than 50 peer-reviewed papers were examined to assess the health impacts of spay / neuter in female and male dogs, respectively. One cannot ignore the findings of increased risk from osteosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma, hypothyroidism, and other less frequently occurring diseases associated with neutering male dogs. It would be irresponsible of the veterinary profession and the pet owning community to fail to weigh the relative costs and benefits of neutering on the animal’s health and well-being. The decision for females may be more complex, further emphasizing the need for individualized veterinary medical decisions, not standard operating procedures for all patients. No sweeping generalizations are implied in this review. Rather, the author asks us to consider all the health and disease information available as individual animals are evaluated. Then, the best decisions should be made accounting for gender, age, breed, and even the specific conditions under which the long-term care, housing and training of the animal will occur.

Dog Health: Vaccinations
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Dog Health: Vaccinations Almost all authorities believe that dogs should be vaccinated against common or dangerous infectious diseases. Vaccines don’t always completely protect a dog from getting sick. However, they usually provide a great deal of protection and reduce the severity of symptoms if the dog does become infected. It is best to consult with a local veterinarian to come up with the best vaccination schedule for your canine companions. There are no viable alternatives to vaccines. What Are Vaccines? Vaccines are liquid suspensions of dead or weakened viruses or bacteria that reduce the risk of infection by those organisms. Several types of vaccines are available for dogs: Modified Live Vaccines. Modified live vaccines trigger an immune reaction, but have lost most or all of their ability to cause infectious disease. Killed Vaccines. Killed vaccines are made from dead organisms, which can’t cause infection but can stimulate an immune response. Modified live vaccines typically cause a faster, more effective, and longer-lasting immunity than killed vaccines. Recombinant Vaccines. Some newer vaccines use recombinant technology and genetic engineering to alter potentially infectious organisms.

State of Pet Health 2012 Report - Banfield State of Pet Health

W elcome to Banfield Pet Hospital’s State of Pet Health 2012 Report—the only report of its kind to capture and analyze the medical data from more than 2 million dogs and nearly 430,000 cats. As the largest veterinary practice in the world, Banfield operates more than 800 hospitals in 43 states, and more than 13,000 associates—including 2,600 licensed veterinarians—work at Banfield. As such, Banfield has a unique understanding of the health of companion animals. Through our extensive commitment to innovation, our practice has created this ground-breaking report, now in its second year. Our commitment to ongoing preventive care and early disease diagnosis was the driving force behind our focus on the chronic diseases and conditions highlighted in this year’s report, including: overweight and obesity, arthritis, kidney disease, thyroid disease and heart disease. Over the past five years, many chronic conditions have continued to increase, in some instances, at an alarming rate. In this report, the overweight and obesity findings are some of the most concerning—since 2007, overweight and obesity have increased by 37 percent in dogs and 90 percent in cats. When pets are diagnosed as overweight, their waistline is not the only concern; the condition is associated with other serious diseases such as arthritis, diabetes mellitus, heart disease and hypothyroidism.

APHIS Form 7001
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According to t he P aperwork R eduction Act o f 1995, an ag ency ma y not cond uct or sponsor, an d a p erson i s not r equired to r espond to , a c ollection of information unless it displays a valid OMB control number. The valid OMB control numbers for this information collection are 0579-0036 and 0579-0333. The ti me r equired to complete t his i nformation col lection i s esti mated t o av erage .25 h ours per r esponse, i ncluding the ti me for rev iewing in structions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE UNITED STATES INTERSTATE AND INTERNATIONAL CERTIFICATE OF HEALTH EXAMINATION FOR SMALL ANIMALS WARNING: Anyone who makes a false, fictitious, or fraudulent statement on this document, or uses such document knowing it to be false, fictitious, or fraudulent may be subject to a fine of not more than $10,000 or imprisonment of not more than 5 years or both (18 U.S.C. 1001).

Kangal Dog Health and Pedigree Database Data Collection Form

The Kangal Dog Health and Pedigree Database (KDCA P&H Database) is a project of the Kangal Dog Club of America. The purpose of the Database is to carefully develop and make available to contributors a comprehensive Kangal Dog database on dog lineages and health records to aid in the protection and development of our cherished breed. The project seeks to recruit information on all documented pure bred Kangal Dogs, regardless of registration, from around the world, and to make it available for protecting and developing the Kangal Dog to those involved in its husbandry. Database operations are guided by the KDCA Kangal Dog Health and Pedigree Database Policy, Version 2007. Data integrity, participant privacy rights, and data access are fundamental issues that are addressed in the Policy and are of paramount concern for this project. Data Form Instructions Please complete the form as fully as possible with the best available information. The only information required is page 1 and all entries must submit a fully completed and signed copy of this page in order to be accepted. Attach the requested or required documentation information as indicated. Please attach a copy of your dog’s official pedigree if it is registered and also include any extended pedigree information that you can. If your dog is not registered, please include as complete a lineage as you can and as much documentation for this lineage as is available.

Dogs' Social Lives and Disease Risks - American Veterinary ...

Whether it’s the dog park, doggie day care, boarding, competitions or training classes, mingling dogs with varied or unknown health histories can present health problems for dogs as well as their owners. The very reason you take your dog to a dog gathering – social mixing with other dogs – is the same thing that can put them at risk. Diseases can be spread through direct contact between dogs, shared bowls and equipment, contaminated water, stool, insects and other methods. People who visit these areas and interact with the dogs may also become infected with zoonotic diseases, which are diseases that can be spread from animals to people. In addition, any gathering that puts people and dogs together introduces the risk of dog bites. As always, your veterinarian is your best source for animal health information. If your dog is showing signs of illness, consult your veterinarian for diagnosis and treatment. If you feel you have been exposed or made ill by any of the conditions listed below, consult a physician. This document isn’t intended to scare dog owners away from participating in and enjoying social events involving dogs; rather, it is intended to inform you of the risks and some common sense measures that can decrease the disease risks for you and your dog(s). Disease risks for dogs Disease risks for people Common sense measures to protect your dogs, yourself and others Disease Risks for Dogs The following is a list of the most common diseases to which your dog(s) may be exposed at a dog gathering. There may be specific risks in your area that are not listed.

Health Issues of Bernese Mountain Dogs - Trbmdc.org

Health Issues In Bernese Mountain Dogs Introduction ► The health of a Bernese Mountain Dog is influenced by a combination of genetics and environment. All dogs possess genetic (inherited) strengths and weaknesses, and the Bernese is no exception. Over 300 genetic diseases, afflictions, or structural faults have been identified in purebred dogs. There are likely more inherited health problems that research has not yet identified. There are ways that a breeder can decrease the chances that undesirable traits are passed on to offspring. But, while genetics plays an important role in determining how healthy and physically sound a dog may be, the kind of care a dog receives throughout its lifetime also plays a significant role in the dog‟s ongoing health. The Healthcare Team ► A Berner‟s “healthcare team” consists of the breeder, owner and veterinarian. Their collective job is to provide for the dog‟s healthcare needs. A breeder‟s contribution begins when he/she chooses a pair of dogs that will be used to produce puppies. Once a pup comes to its new home, it is then the owner‟s responsibility to manage the dog and foster good health and habits. A veterinarian provides professional medical care throughout a dog‟s lifetime. Effective communication among the healthcare team is important to providing the best healthcare possible.

Medium-Sized Mixed Breeds - Northwest Neighborhood Veterinary ...

Medium-Sized Mixed Breeds: They’re Unique! Your dog is special! She’s your best friend and companion and a source of unconditional love. Chances are that you chose her because you like medium-sized dogs, and you expected her to have certain traits that would fit your lifestyle: • • • • • Well suited as a family dog Intelligent and easy to train People-oriented and eager to please Brave and ready for adventure Lively, with a friendly personality No dog is perfect, though, and you may have noticed these characteristics, too: • • • • Easily bored and can find trouble Determined and has a mind of her own Needs regular exercise and diet regulation to avoid weight gain Prone to separation anxiety and associated chewing and digging behaviors Is it all worth it? Of course! She’s got her own personality, and you love her for it. Your Mixed-Breed Dog’s Health We know that because you care so much about your dog, you want to take good care of him. That’s why we’ll tell you about the health concerns we’ll be discussing with you over the life of your friend. Knowing your pal’s genetic make-up is an important Northwest Neighborhood Veterinary Hospital (503) 227-6047 www.nwneighborhoodvet.com for lumps and bumps when we examine your pet. If she is overweight, we’ll discuss exercise and diet because obesity is a risk factor for some types of cancer.

Common Dog Diseases and Health Problems ... - Purdue Extension

Common Dog Diseases and Health Problems Whether your dog is a working companion, champion show animal, hunting partner, or just a best friend, the kindest and most responsible thing you can do for him is to provide proper health care. Knowing about common dog diseases and being aware of appropriate prevention and treatment can better help you provide that care. Many Diseases Can Be Prevented Some of the most common and serious dog diseases have been made less common through vaccines; however, these diseases continue to threaten a dog that lacks proper immunization. Puppies may be vaccinated as early as 4-6 weeks, depending on each situation and the veterinarian’s advice. Through mother’s milk, puppies receive disease-fighting antibodies, which last 6-16 weeks. Vaccinations then take over. Yearly boosters should be given throughout your dog’s life, including old age when your dog may become more susceptible to some diseases. The following diseases can be prevented through vaccinations. Distemper. Canine distemper is caused by a highly contagious, airborne virus. It affects the dog’s respiratory, gastrointestinal, and nervous systems. Early symptoms are those of a “cold” — runny eyes and nose, fever, cough, and often diarrhea. Later in the course of disease there may be nervous twitching, paralysis, and seizures (convulsions). There is no successful treatment.

Organic Freeze Dried Camu Camu Powder

we are dedicated to providing the Highest Quality completely Pure, Bio-Active and Cost Effective Raw Organic and Wild-Crafted Superfoods from around the world, directly to your door. Your health is our #1 goal. We ensure that all of our products are of the highest quality.

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