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Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics - California Kids Dental and ...

Dr. Kevin Badii and the team of dental professionals at Badii Orthodontics and California Kids Dental & Orthodontics have your smile covered. With eight practices conveniently located around Southern California, our orthodontic specialists offer treatment for all ages in a neighborhood near you. Our pediatric dental specialists are skilled in a range of procedures and perform both restorative and preventative dental care for infants, children, and teens, including free school screenings. “We always say, ‘prevention is the best treatment.’ This treatment philosophy factors into everything we do, every day in our practice,” says Dr. Badii. Badii Orthodontics and California Kids Dental & Orthodontics have grown purely from word of mouth and doctor referrals because the doctors take the time to listen to and educate each patient. Each practice fosters a fun and friendly environment, while focusing on the patient’s comfort. Some locations even offer separate areas for adults, complete with video games, movies and big screen televisions. How else does Dr. Badii make dentistry fun? “We always have office and online games and contests with really cool prizes,” he says. Dental care is our passion, and like a smile, that’s just something you can’t fake. “Your smile is our passion!”

User's Guide - Autodesk
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January 2008 © 2008 Autodesk, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Except as otherwise permitted by Autodesk, Inc., this publication, or parts thereof, may not be reproduced in any form, by any method, for any purpose. Certain materials included in this publication are reprinted with the permission of the copyright holder. Trademarks The following are registered trademarks or trademarks of Autodesk, Inc., in the USA and other countries: 3DEC (design/logo), 3December, 3December.com, 3ds Max, ADI, Alias, Alias (swirl design/logo), AliasStudio, Alias|Wavefront (design/logo), ATC, AUGI, AutoCAD, AutoCAD Learning Assistance, AutoCAD LT, AutoCAD Simulator, AutoCAD SQL Extension, AutoCAD SQL Interface, Autodesk, Autodesk Envision, Autodesk Insight, Autodesk Intent, Autodesk Inventor, Autodesk Map, Autodesk MapGuide, Autodesk Streamline, AutoLISP, AutoSnap, AutoSketch, AutoTrack, Backdraft, Built with ObjectARX (logo), Burn, Buzzsaw, CAiCE, Can You Imagine, Character Studio, Cinestream, Civil 3D, Cleaner, Cleaner Central, ClearScale, Colour Warper, Combustion, Communication Specification, Constructware, Content Explorer, Create>what's>Next> (design/logo), Dancing Baby (image), DesignCenter, Design Doctor, Designer's Toolkit, DesignKids, DesignProf, DesignServer, DesignStudio, Design|Studio (design/logo), Design Web Format, DWF, DWG, DWG (logo), DWG Extreme, DWG TrueConvert, DWG TrueView, DXF, Ecotect, Exposure, Extending the Design Team, FBX, Filmbox, FMDesktop, Freewheel, GDX Driver, Gmax, Green Building Studio, Heads-up Design, Heidi, HumanIK, IDEA Server, i-drop, ImageModeler, iMOUT, Incinerator, Inventor, Inventor LT, Kaydara, Kaydara (design/logo), Kynapse, Kynogon, LandXplorer, LocationLogic, Lustre, Matchmover, Maya, Mechanical Desktop, MotionBuilder, Movimento, Mudbox, NavisWorks, ObjectARX, ObjectDBX, Open Reality, Opticore, Opticore Opus, PolarSnap, PortfolioWall, Powered with Autodesk Technology, Productstream, ProjectPoint, ProMaterials, RasterDWG, Reactor, RealDWG, Real-time Roto, REALVIZ, Recognize, Render Queue, Retimer,Reveal, Revit, Showcase, ShowMotion, SketchBook, SteeringWheels, Stitcher, StudioTools, Topobase, Toxik, TrustedDWG, ViewCube, Visual, Visual Construction, Visual Drainage, Visual Landscape, Visual Survey, Visual Toolbox, Visual LISP, Voice Reality, Volo, Vtour, Wiretap, and WiretapCentral. The following are registered trademarks or trademarks of Autodesk Canada Co. in the USA and/or Canada and other countries: Backburner, Discreet, Fire, Flame, Flint, Frost, Inferno, Multi-Master Editing, River, Smoke, Sparks, Stone, and Wire. The following are registered trademarks or trademarks of Moldflow Corp. in the USA and/or other countries: Moldflow MPA, MPA (design/logo), Moldflow Plastics Advisers, MPI, MPI (design/logo), Moldflow Plastics Insight, MPX, MPX (design/logo), Moldflow Plastics Xpert. All other brand names, product names or trademarks belong to their respective holders.

Implementation Guide - Autodesk - Cracking the Vault

January 2009 © 2010 Autodesk, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Except as otherwise permitted by Autodesk, Inc., this publication, or parts thereof, may not be reproduced in any form, by any method, for any purpose. Certain materials included in this publication are reprinted with the permission of the copyright holder. Trademarks The following are registered trademarks or trademarks of Autodesk, Inc., and/or its subsidiaries and/or affiliates in the USA and other countries: 3DEC (design/logo), 3December, 3December.com, 3ds Max, Algor, Alias, Alias (swirl design/logo), AliasStudio, Alias|Wavefront (design/logo), ATC, AUGI, AutoCAD, AutoCAD Learning Assistance, AutoCAD LT, AutoCAD Simulator, AutoCAD SQL Extension, AutoCAD SQL Interface, Autodesk, Autodesk Envision, Autodesk Intent, Autodesk Inventor, Autodesk Map, Autodesk MapGuide, Autodesk Streamline, AutoLISP, AutoSnap, AutoSketch, AutoTrack, Backburner, Backdraft, Built with ObjectARX (logo), Burn, Buzzsaw, CAiCE, Civil 3D, Cleaner, Cleaner Central, ClearScale, Colour Warper, Combustion, Communication Specification, Constructware, Content Explorer, Dancing Baby (image), DesignCenter, Design Doctor, Designer's Toolkit, DesignKids, DesignProf, DesignServer, DesignStudio, Design Web Format, Discreet, DWF, DWG, DWG (logo), DWG Extreme, DWG TrueConvert, DWG TrueView, DXF, Ecotect, Exposure, Extending the Design Team, Face Robot, FBX, Fempro, Fire, Flame, Flare, Flint, FMDesktop, Freewheel, GDX Driver, Green Building Studio, Heads-up Design, Heidi, HumanIK, IDEA Server, i-drop, ImageModeler, iMOUT, Incinerator, Inferno, Inventor, Inventor LT, Kaydara, Kaydara (design/logo), Kynapse, Kynogon, LandXplorer, Lustre, MatchMover, Maya, Mechanical Desktop, Moldflow, Moonbox, MotionBuilder, Movimento, MPA, MPA (design/logo), Moldflow Plastics Advisers, MPI, Moldflow Plastics Insight, MPX, MPX (design/logo), Moldflow Plastics Xpert, Mudbox, Multi-Master Editing, Navisworks, ObjectARX, ObjectDBX, Open Reality, Opticore, Opticore Opus, Pipeplus, PolarSnap, PortfolioWall, Powered with Autodesk Technology, Productstream, ProjectPoint, ProMaterials, RasterDWG, RealDWG, Real-time Roto, Recognize, Render Queue, Retimer,Reveal, Revit, Showcase, ShowMotion, SketchBook, Smoke, Softimage, Softimage|XSI (design/logo), Sparks, SteeringWheels, Stitcher, Stone, StudioTools, ToolClip, Topobase, Toxik, TrustedDWG, ViewCube, Visual, Visual LISP, Volo, Vtour, Wire, Wiretap, WiretapCentral, XSI, and XSI (design/logo). All other brand names, product names or trademarks belong to their respective holders.

Smart Choice for Reputable, Reliable & Innovative Wide Product of Veggie Capsules

Medicine is for health when doctor prescribe you to eat them you can eat because they cure your body.

HEMORRHAGIC TONSILLITIS AS A RARE PRESENTATION OF ...

Hemorrhagic tonsillitis is a rare complication of acute or chronic tonsillitis and could be fatal in some cases. Few cases were reported in the literature. Here we present a seven years old female child who was presented with bilateral tonsillar hemorrhage and a history of chronic recurrent tonsillitis. Her investigations and management are discussed. Key words: Hemorrhagic, Streptococcus, Tonsillitis, Bleeding JRMS February 2010, 17(Supp 1): 33-34 The tonsils are lymph tissues located on either side of the back of the throat. Their functions are to destroy microorganisms entering the nose and throat. Most episodes of acute pharyngotonsillitis are viral. Group A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus is the most common cause of bacterial infection in the tonsils. Others causes are beta-hemolytic Streptococcus species (Lancefield Groups, Group C or B),(1,2) Staphylococcus aureus, gram-negative organisms and Mycoplasma pneumonia are other causes.(1) Hemorrhagic tonsillitis, which is a complication of acute or chronic tonsillitis, is almost always found in association with peritonsillar abscess and is rarely reported in the new antibiotic era. It is a serious condition and could be fatal in some cases if hemorrhage was not controlled from tonsillar blood vessels.(3) Here we report the case of a seven years old female child with severe toxicity, follicular tonsillitis, and bleeding tonsils that presented to our emergency pediatric clinic, and was diagnosed as a case of hemorrhagic tonsillitis. A seven years old female child presented to our outpatient’s pediatric clinic with high fever, toxicity, malaise, inability to swallow, and sore throat. Physical examination showed a blood pressure of 90/40mmHg, pulse 100/minute and axillary temperature of 39 degrees Celcius. Throat examination showed follicular tonsillitis with bleeding tonsils (Fig.1). An otorhinolaryngologist (ENT) doctor was consulted and otopharyngeal examination showed hugely enlarged, swollen, congested and bluish tonsils bilaterally with whitish debris on both of them. There were diffuse superficial oozing points on both tonsils and bilateral tender and enlarged cervical lymph nodes. A pack soaked with 2% hydrogen peroxide was applied locally for both sides and silver nitrate cautery was done which controlled the bleeding points. Her throat swab showed alpha-hemolytic Streptococcus, no serological typing for the isolated Streptococcus was done. Complete blood count showed Leucocytosis with neutrophilia. Her prothrombin time (PT) and partial thromboplastin time (PTT) were normal.

Paediatric Orthopaedic Surgery Published By Orthopaedic Excellence

Childrens Orthopaedic problem need an understanding not only of the ailment but also understanding the psyche of children to enable them to get better and for them to have confidence in their doctor.

H1N1 Influenza Virus, H1N1 Vaccine and Mitochondrial Disease

H1N1 Influenza Virus, H1N1 Vaccine and Mitochondrial Disease There have been questions regarding recommendations about people with mitochondrial disease receiving the H1N1 vaccine. The Scientific and Medical Advisory Board (SMAB) of the UMDF did discuss the issue in great detail and these comments reflect the board’s discussion. Much of the factual information has been obtained from governmental websites. The H1N1 virus, also called “the swine flu” typically causes fever, cold symptoms (cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose), body aches, loss of appetite, and headache. As with any fever, chills may be present. Fatigue is part of most flu illnesses. Vomiting and diarrhea are reported in some and there are now cases where people have respiratory symptoms without a fever. These symptoms range from mild to severe. There are some people that get sick, but never are sick enough to think about seeing a doctor, whereas others with the same virus will die as a result of their infection. At this point it is not possible to know if the infection will spread to epidemic proportions, or if the virus, which now seems as “bad” as most influenza viruses but no worse, will shift to a strain that will cause more or less severe disease. If you think anyone in the family may have the H1N1 virus, we advise that you seek out immediate medical attention. As part of general medical practice, both fever and dehydration should be treated with standard medical management. Sometimes bedrest, ibuprofen or acetaminophen and fluids are what will be recommended. Use of antiviral medication is given for more severe cases (which are believed to be safe in those with a mitochondrial disorder). For those people that have shown to be susceptible to regression after dehydration, the use of IV hydration and appropriate IV rehydration therapies is reasonable. Aspirin should be avoided.

Living a Balanced Life with Diabetes. - Centers for Disease Control ...

Eating too much or not eating enough as a way of dealing with stress can make it hard for you to take care of yourself and your diabetes. Stress and some foods, like white rice, white bread, cookies, pies, or cake, can all raise your blood sugar level. Not eating enough food can cause low blood sugar. If you have diabetes, it is important that you make healthy food choices to keep your blood sugar levels under control. Be aware of the times when you feel down and the kinds of foods you eat when you are stressed. If you find that you eat high-calorie foods when you are feeling down, try having healthy foods around the house to snack on. Healthy snacks include non-fat/no sugar ice cream, whole wheat bread or crackers, low-fat cheese, or half a banana. ❑ Choose whole grain foods— whole wheat bread and crackers, oatmeal, brown rice, and cereals. Tips to Handle Stress When you feel stressed: ❑ Limit the amount of solid fats and sugars when cooking or eating by trimming fat from meat, using less butter or margarine, and using less sugar. ❑ Make your meals lighter by using nonfat or low-fat milk, cheese, or mayonnaise. Use cooking spray instead of oil. • Talk with an elder about your concerns. ❑ Eat a healthy snack between meals. • Be with others that you have fun with. ❑ Choose water to drink. • Do something nice for someone else. • Take a nature walk. • Learn a new activity, like fishing, horseback riding, or some other things that you might enjoy doing with others. Be sure to also talk to your health care team (diabetes educator, dietitian, doctor, nurse, psychologist, or social worker), your spiritual counselor, or some other person that you trust. They can help you get the support you need. Learn More about Diabetes: National Diabetes Education Program 1-888-693-NDEP (6337) www.YourDiabetesInfo.org www.YourDiabetesInfo.org/resources/diabetes­ healthsense/ Indian Health Service Families- Healthy Eating www.ihs.gov/HeadStart/index.cfm?module=hs_ families_healthy_eating American Diabetes Association 1-800-DIABETES (342-2383)

Act Now A Parent's Guide to Girls' Bone Health - Best Bones Forever!

Between ages 9-18, your daughter is in her key bonebuilding years. By age 18, she will have built most of her bone mass.1 That means right now is the best time to give her the support she needs to build strong bones. Less than one in 10 girls gets the calcium she needs each day.2 As girls get older, they tend to get less calcium and physical activity—two important things they need to build strong bones. 2 Support Your Daughter’s Bones Take these steps to build and maintain strong, healthy bones: For You... Be a good role model for your family. Know your own risk factors for osteoporosis. Talk to your doctor about your bone health. For Your Daughter... Make being healthy a part of your family routine. Help her make healthy food choices, including foods high in calcium and vitamin D. Help her get one hour of physical activity daily, including bone-strengthening activities at least three days per week.

Prostate Cancer Symptoms - Time Well Spent - Anthem

Should you get a prostate cancer screening? Talk with your doctor. You can also learn more at cancer.org/cancer/prostatecancer/index. Symptoms When the prostate gets bigger because of cancer, it can squeeze the urethra. This stops or slows down the flow of urine. This may be a sign of prostate cancer. But other health conditions can cause the same problem, so check with your doctor if this happens to you. The same is true for these prostate cancer symptoms: Frequent urination (especially at night) }} Difficulty urinating }} Pain or burning during urination }} Blood in the urine or semen }} Nagging pain in the back, hips or pelvis }} Painful ejaculation }} Screening for prostate cancer Not all men have symptoms when they have prostate cancer. Routine screenings can be done to find it, but the decision to get a prostate cancer screening is yours. Not all health and medical organizations agree on whether screenings are right for everyone. Talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits. Sources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website: CDC Features: Prostate Cancer (accessed February 2013): cdc.gov. National Cancer Institute website: What You Need to Know about Prostate Cancer (accessed February 2013): cancer.org. American Cancer Society website: Prostate Cancer (accessed February 2013): cancer.gov. This information is meant to be educational. It should not be interpreted as medical advice. Please talk to your doctor about changes that may affect your health. Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield is the trade name of: In Colorado: Rocky Mountain Hospital and Medical Service, Inc. HMO products underwritten by HMO Colorado, Inc. In Connecticut: Anthem Health Plans, Inc. In Indiana: Anthem Insurance Companies, Inc. In Kentucky: Anthem Health Plans of Kentucky, Inc. In Maine: Anthem Health Plans of Maine, Inc. In Missouri (excluding 30 counties in the Kansas City area): RightCHOICE® Managed Care, Inc. (RIT), Healthy Alliance® Life Insurance Company (HALIC), and HMO Missouri, Inc. RIT and certain affiliates administer non-HMO

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