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diagrama sistema electrico del motor ford expedition 1997

CCI Consultant
by ccilearningcenter 0 Comments favorite 12 Viewed Download 0 Times

Merico (Rico) Fantigrossi retired from the United States Marine Corps in November of 1991, after serving his country honorably in both war and peace for over twenty-six years. Upon his retirement, he returned to his hometown-Rochester, New York. While waiting for an opportunity in law enforcement, he took a position as an automobile salesman for Gabrielle Ford, in Churchville, New York, a suburb of Rochester. What began as a temporary job, soon developed into a permanent and very successful career. Rico consistently rose to the top of the sales team in sales, gross per unit, customer satisfaction, and both repeat and referral business. After eighteen successful months as a salesman, he moved rapidly in the dealership, from deal closer and assistant manager to desk manager and back-up F&I manager.

VEXplorer Contest Challenges Robot Enthusiasts - VEX Robotics

VEXplorer Contest Challenges Robot Enthusiasts Mythbuster Grant Imahara and Robot Select Top 25 VEXplorer Robot Ideas Northbrook, IL (April 3, 2007) – Protecting koi fish from a curious crane, launching cigarette butts back at their polluting perpetrators, playing fetch with a pet dog or dealing cards at the next poker night. This is the short list of the many robotics ideas submitted in response to the Grant Imahara VEXplorer Robot Challenge launched by Revell in March 2008. Revell, marketer of the VEXplorer robotics system, in partnership with Robot magazine, Innovation First and SolidWorks Corporation, is running this first-ever VEXplorer challenge offering contestants the opportunity to demonstrate their robotics creativity as they compete for a $5,000 college scholarship and other prizes. Grant Imahara, Discovery Channel’s Mythbuster known for his robotics skill, and Robot magazine selected 25 robot enthusiasts’ ideas. These contestants, who received free VEXplorer systems, have until June 1st to design, build and videotape their unique VEXplorer robots doing unusual things. Contestants will upload their videos to YouTube for the world to view and for Grant Imahara and Robot magazine to select first, second and third place winners. “I was very impressed with the wide range of ideas and creativity of the submissions,” said Grant Imahara, Discovery Channel’s Mythbuster. “I know selecting the winners is not going to be an easy job.” “Currently, robots are walking into live volcanoes, painting cars at Ford plants, assembling Milano cookies for Pepperidge Farms and driving trains in Paris,” said Mike Brezette, Revell marketing vice president. “Robots are an integral part of our world and we are excited to help today’s enthusiasts turn their robotics ideas into reality.” VEXplorer is available at toy and discount merchandise retailers including Toys “R” Us, and Fred Meyer, as well as at hobby stores across the nation. Online toy, hobby, discount...

Crowdfunding the Cheapest Robots in Silicon Valley: A ... - CITRIS

They wanted to show me origami robots: electronic creatures built by simply folding paper (in this case laser-cut cardboard) and adding simple electronics and engineering on top. It sounded too cool to be true. Yet, after hearing the pitch from Dash Robotics, I found myself convinced that the technology had the potential to not only perform successfully in the marketplace at a decent price point, but could do so at a commercial scale that “cheap robots” have never before achieved. Dash Robotics was founded at UC Berkeley by four Ph.D. students with a simple mission — to make robots cheap, lightweight, and fun to use. The breakthrough came when one of the founders realized that robot joints could be mechanically engineered and constructed in a completely different way. Traditionally, robots large and small have come with lots of parts. Metal parts, plastic parts, pins and screws and joints that all have to be cast or injection molded, usually one by one. This adds cost and weight and rigidity, and that’s what makes building robots so expensive. The entry price point for even the simplest toy robot starts around $300 to $400. But Dash Robotics turned all that painstaking manufacturing on its head by turning to cheap, strong and flexible cardboard. Using paper rather than plastic or metal parts meant that only glue was needed to hold the structure together. Designing the cutouts into one flat sheet of cardboard meant that the cost of goods were barely a cost at all. And including a cheap, off-the-shelf rechargeable motor that can be wirelessly controlled with a small handheld remote helped keep further engineering costs to a minimum. Voila! cheap robot. One that Dash estimates can sell for between $35 to $50, yet could possibly be manufactured for a fraction of that price. Moreover, these robots (they look and act like insects, legs and all) are highly mobile and lightweight, allowing them to maneuver in all sorts of directions and even fly when fitted with a pair wings. And if they get smashed (toys will be toys), they don’t cost an arm and a leg to replace.

Shadow ACE 750 Oil Change - Strictly ACE 750

If you're a thrifty soul like I am (notice I didn't say cheap), you'll want to save some dough by doing your oil change yourself. It's really easy, doesn't take a lot of muscle or time, and you can spend what you save by doing it yourself on some toys for your bike. Having previously purchased the Honda Service Manual (I figured it oughta come in handy for more than just an oil change), I purchased my supplies to do my own oil change at 4000 miles. I bought the Honda oil filter wrench because you can put a 3/8" drive ratchet on it to loosen or tighten the filter. It's not cheap, but it's a good one-time investment for your bike. If you've ever changed the oil and filter in a 4-wheel vehicle, it's the same concept, everything's just in a different place. Following the Service Manual, here's what I did. All sections italicized are direct quotes from the Honda Service Manual. NOTE: Change the engine oil with the engine warm and the motorcycle on its side stand to assure complete and rapid draining. Start the engine and let it idle for a few minutes to warm the oil. Remove the oil dipstick. This provides an air gap for the oil to flow freely while draining. Locate the oil drain plug. It is on the left side, at the bottom of the engine. There is not enough space to use a ratchet, so I used a 17mm combination wrench. The open end included in your bike's toolkit will work fine. Loosen the drain plug, then place a drain pan under the drain plug. Remove the drain plug. Let the oil drain into the drain pan. Now the manual states: With the engine stop switch "OFF", push the starter button for a few seconds to drain any oil which may be left in the engine. NOTE: Do not operate the motor for more than a few seconds.

Oil Change - How to do the

THE PERFECT OIL CHANGE The “Perfect Oil Change” is the easiest thing in the world to do. The problem is that oil changes are often seen as a chore, and the necessary time and attention are often skimped in the rush to get to something that seems more important. You may well be the first owner of the tractor to do this right. The first step is to get the motor good and hot. Run it for at least a half-hour, until the cylinder head is too hot to touch and the oil filter can is uncomfortably warm. This ensures that the oil is hot, which makes it flow easier, and it also makes sure that any crud in the oil is fully entrained and will come out with it. Park it, shut it off, and immediately remove the drain plug on the underside of the engine. Have a drain pan that will hold 6 quarts of oil under the drain. You’ll get a hot, oily hand, because the drain hole is big and most of the oil will come out in one big rush. Once that is draining, turn to the oil filter can, on the left side of the engine. Remove the cap by undoing the big hexagon bolt on the top. Don’t remove the filter yet. Next, locate the drain plug for the filter can – it’s on the bottom of the can, towards the front. It may have a hexagon head, or it may have a square head – either way, it’s usually all boogered up from people using pliers to remove it. Remove it, with a drain pan under the hole – this will allow the oil in the filter can to drain out. Now – go away and leave it alone. Find something else to do, but leave it to drain for at least an hour,...

Gear Case Oil Change BF2~BF30 - Honda

Gear Case Oil Change BF2~BF30 Change the gear case oil with the engine stopped and the outboard in the vertical position. We suggest wearing nitrile BF2, BF20 (2 HP) gloves to protect your hands and facilitate clean-up. 1. Place a suitable container below the oil drain hole to catch the used oil. Remove the oil drain plug first, and then remove the oil level plug. OIL LEVEL HOLE/PLUG OIL DRAIN HOLE/PLUG Note: Be sure to use the proper tool when removing the oil drain and oil level plugs. If a normal screwdriver will not loosen the plugs, an impact driver should be used. The screwdriver blade should be a minimum of 10 mm x 1.5 mm to prevent damage to the drain and level plugs. Some plugs may have a Phillips head. Use a #3 Phillips bit, not a #2. 2. Allow the used oil to drain completely. If water or contaminated (milky-colored) oil flows out the drain hole when the plug is removed, or the oil is black and smells burned, have the outboard motor checked by an authorized Honda Marine dealer. GEAR OIL BOTTLE NOTICE Improper disposal of gear case oil can be harmful to the environment. If you change your own oil, please dispose of the used oil properly. Put it in a sealed container, and take it to a recycling center. Do not discard it in a trash bin, dump it on the ground, or pour it down the drain. BF5~BF30

Oil Change
by Handmatige installatie 0 Comments favorite 11 Viewed Download 0 Times

Motor Oil Place the bike on the center stand (not the kick stand) The Drain Plug and the Dipstick for the motor oil are located on the right side of the bike. Place a drain pan under the Drain Plug and remove the plug with a 17mm socket or wrench. Lancepowersports.com A small spring and Screen Type Oil Filter will also pop out. Place these two items off to the side and wash them clean by flushing them with new 10W-40 motor oil. (If you keep the dipstick out of the motor, it will drain the oil faster) Let the motor oil drain until only a few drops fall every few seconds. Put the cleaned Oil Filter and the spring back into the engine as shown to the left. If done incorrectly, the filter will not be efficient in collecting dirt and sludge from the engine. Screw back on the drain plug using a torque wrench. The recommended torque for this bolt is 15 lbs/ft. Lancepowersports.com Using a funnel, pour 0.75 quarts of 10W-40 Motor Oil into the engine. We recommend using non-synthetic oil for the first oil change to help the engine break in properly. After the first oil change, feel free to use synthetic oil. Check the oil with the dipstick. Place the dipstick in the motor but do not screw it in. Pull it out and make sure that the oil reading is within the hash-marks, then add or drain oil accordingly until it is. Screw in the dipstick and run the bike for a minute or two and check the level to make sure that you have the proper level. Lancepowersports.com

Autodesk Robot Structural Analysis 2014 - Autodesk Community

© 2013 Autodesk, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Except as otherwise permitted by Autodesk, Inc., this publication, or parts thereof, may not be reproduced in any form, by any method, for any purpose. Certain materials included in this publication are reprinted with the permission of the copyright holder. Disclaimer THIS PUBLICATION AND THE INFORMATION CONTAINED HEREIN IS MADE AVAILABLE BY AUTODESK, INC. “AS IS.” AUTODESK, INC. DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE REGARDING THESE MATERIALS. Trademarks The following are registered trademarks of Autodesk, Inc., in the USA and/or other countries: Autodesk Robot Structural Analysis, Autodesk Concrete Building Structures, Spreadsheet Calculator, ATC, AutoCAD, Autodesk, Autodesk Inventor, Autodesk (logo), Buzzsaw, Design Web Format, DWF, ViewCube, SteeringWheels, and Autodesk Revit. All other brand names, product names or trademarks belong to their respective holders. Third Party Software Program Credits ACIS Copyright© 1989-2001 Spatial Corp. Portions Copyright© 2002 Autodesk, Inc. Copyright© 1997 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. International CorrectSpell™ Spelling Correction System© 1995 by Lernout & Hauspie Speech Products, N.V. All rights reserved. InstallShield™ 3.0. Copyright© 1997 InstallShield Software Corporation. All rights reserved. PANTONE® and other Pantone, Inc. trademarks are the property of Pantone, Inc.© Pantone, Inc., 2002. Portions Copyright© 1991-1996 Arthur D. Applegate. All rights reserved. Portions relating to JPEG © Copyright 1991-1998 Thomas G. Lane. All rights reserved. Portions of this software are based on the work of the Independent JPEG Group. Portions relating to TIFF © Copyright 1997-1998 Sam Leffler. © Copyright 1991-1997 Silicon Graphics, Inc. All rights reserved.

Wiring Diagrams - Comcast.net
by robeo 0 Comments favorite 18 Viewed Download 0 Times

Component Figure No. (Location) A/C COMPONENT CLUTCH ............................ 8 (A 29,A 30) A/C RELAY ....................................... 8 (A 28,A 31) A/C SWITCH ........................................ 8 (B 29-30) AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION SHIFT ILLUMINATOR LIGHT ....... 6 (E 23) ABS SYSTEM ...................................... 7 (C-E 24,27) AIRFLOW SYSTEM .......................... 2,3,4 (C 7,B 11,B 15) ALTERNATOR ............................................ 1 (D 2) BACK-UP LIGHT SWITCH ................................ 10 (E 38) BATTERY ............................................... 1 (A 2) BLOWER MOTOR ......................................... 8 (C 28) BLOWER SWITCH ........................................ 8 (B 28) BRAKE FLUID LEVEL SENSOR ............................. 9 (A 34) BUCKLE SWITCH ......................................... 5 (E 18) CARGO LIGHT ....................................... 10 (C-D 37) CIGARETTE LIGHTER .................................... 6 (E 21) CIRCUIT OPENING RELAY ................... 2,3,4 (A 7,A 11,C 15) CLUTCH SWITCH ................................. 2,4 (A 4, A 12) COMBINATION SWITCH .......................... 8,9 (E 28,C-E 35) CONDENSER FAN ................................... 8 (A 29,A 30) COOLANT THERMO SWITCH (4 CYL) ........................ 7 (A 27) COOLING FAN SYSTEM .............................. 7 (A-C,26-27) CENTRAL PROCESSING UNIT (CPU) ................... 6 (B-C,22-23) CRANK ANGLE SENSOR (V6) .............................. 4 (E 13) CRUISE CONTROL (V6) ............................. 8 (C-E 28-29) DEFOGGER GRID ....................................... 10 (D 39) DIAGNOSTIC CONNECTOR ..................... 2,3,4 (A 4,A 8,D 15) DISTRIBUTOR (V6) ..................................... 4 (E 15) DOOR LOCK TIMER UNIT ................................ 10 (A 36) DOOR SWITCH .......................................... 5 (E 16) DOOR SWITCH (PASSIVE BELTS) ........................ 8 (C-D 30) EC-AT CONTROL UNIT ................................. 7 (A-B 24) EC-AT SOLENOID & INHIBITOR SWITCH ......... 3,7 (C-D 11,C-D 24) EGI MAIN RELAY .......................... 2,3,4 (B 7,A 11,C 15) FLASHER UNIT ......................................... 9 (D 32) FUEL TANK UNIT ...................................... 10 (A 38) FUSE BLOCK .................................... 5,6 (B-D 17-22) HAZARD/DEFOGGER SWITCH ............................... 6 (E 22) HEADLIGHT RELAY ...................................... 9 (D 33) HOLD SWITCH ................................... 3,7 (A 10,A 26) HORN RELAY ........................................... 9 (D 34) HYDRAULIC UNIT (ABS) ............................... 7 (C-D 26) IGNITION COIL .................................. 2,3 (D 7,E 11) IGNITION KEY ILLUMINATOR SWITCH ...................... 6 (B 23) IGNITION SWITCH .................................... 5 (B-C 16) ILLUMINATOR LIGHTS ................................... 6 (E 23)

Wiring Diagram - the Yorba Linda Miata Page

WIRING DIAGRAMS Article Text 1990 Mazda Miata For Yorba Linda Miata Copyright © 1998 Mitchell Repair Information Company, LLC Saturday, May 10, 2003 11:19AM ARTICLE BEGINNING 1990 WIRING DIAGRAMS Mazda Miata IDENTIFICATION COMPONENT LOCATION MENU COMPONENT LOCATIONS TABLE Figure No. (Location) A/C RELAY ....................................... 3 (E 11) A/C THERMO SWITCH ................................ 3 (E 8) A/T CONTROL UNIT .............................. 4 (D-E 16) AIR BAG CONTROL UNIT ............................ 4 (B 16) ALTERNATOR ....................................... 1 (D 3) BACKUP BATTERY .................................. 5 (A 16) BATTERY .......................................... 1 (A 2) BLOWER MOTOR RELAY ............................... 3 (D 9) CIG LIGHTER ...................................... 3 (C 9) CIRCUIT OPENING RELAY ............................ 2 (C 4) CLUTCH SWITCH M/T ................................ 2 (E 7) COMBINATION SW .......................... 4, 5 (D 12 C 16) COOLING FAN RELAY ............................... 3 (E 10) CRUISE CONTROL ................................ 4 (C-E 15) DIAG CONNECTOR ................................... 2 (B 4) DIR/HAZ SWITCH .................................. 4 (C 14) DOOR SWITCH ..................................... 3 (C 10) ENGINE CONTROL UNIT (ECU) ...................... 2 (A 4-7) FOG LIGHT SWITCH ................................ 4 (C 12) FUEL TANK UNIT .................................. 5 (A 18) FUSE BLOCK .................................... 3 (B 9-10) HEADLIGHT RELAY ................................. 4 (D 14) HEADLIGHT RETRACTORS ........................ 1 (B 1, D 1) HEATER CONTROL UNIT .............................. 3 (E 8) HORN RELAY ...................................... 5 (C 17) IGNITER .......................................... 2 (C 4) IGNITION COIL .................................... 2 (D 4) IGNITION SWITCH .................................. 3 (A 8) ILLUM LIGHTS ............................... 4 (B-C 12-13) INHIBITOR SWITCH ................................. 1 (A 3) INSTRUMENT CLUSTER ........................... 4 (A 12-15)

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