SEARCH

Found 2201 related files. Current in page 1

diabetes insipidus diabetes mellitus and SIADH share which clinical manifestations

Global DNA and Gene Chip
by david765 0 Comments favorite 13 Viewed Download 0 Times

Microarrays were developed and commercialized in the eighties. Since then, market has offered tremendous growth and hence has seen an influx of players vying fiercely for a share or this market. The Global DNA & Gene Chip (microarray) market was valued at $760 million in 2010 and is expected to reach $1,425.2 million by 2015 growing at a CAGR of 13.4%. Major players in this market include Affymetrix, Inc. (U.S.), Illumnia, Inc. (U.S.), Agilent Technologies, Inc. (U.S.), Roche NimbleGen (U.S.), Sequenom Inc, (U.S.), and others.

JANE WILLIAMS - Rhode Island College
by klinsy 0 Comments favorite 4 Viewed Download 0 Times

JANE WILLIAMS, PhD, RN Dean and Professor of Nursing School of Nursing, Rhode Island College 600 Mt. Pleasant Avenue, Providence, RI 02908 TEL: 401 456-9608: FAX: 401 456-8206 Email: jwilliams@ric.edu CURRENT EMPLOYMENT Rhode Island College, Dean and Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, 1975-present; initial appointment as assistant professor, 1975; appointed Professor, 1995, Department Chairperson, 2000, and Dean, 2007. EDUCATION University of Rhode Island, College of Nursing, Kingston, Rhode Island, Ph.D., Nursing, 1995. New York University, School of Education, New York, New York, M.A., Major in Education and Minor in Nursing, 1968; University of Michigan, School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, Michigan, B.S.N. with Distinction, 1966. PUBLICATIONS Williams, J., Brumbaugh, M. & Vares, L., (2006), “Education to improve interdisciplinary practice of health care professionals: A pilot project”, Medicine & Health, Rhode Island, 89 (9), p. 312-313. Mosser, N., Williams, J. & Wood, C. (2006), “The use of progression testing throughout nursing programs: How two colleges promote success on NCLEX-RN”. Annual Review of Nursing Education. Vol.4, p. 305-319. Newman, M. and Williams, J. (2003) "Educating Nurses in Rhode Island: A lot of diversity in a little place", Journal of Cultural Diversity, Vol. 10, No. 3, p. 91-95. Williams, J., (2001) “The Clinical Notebook: Using Student Portfolios to Enhance Teaching and Learning, Journal of Nursing Education. Vol. 40, p. 135-137. Ferszt, G., Massotti, E., Miller, J. & Williams, J. (2000) “Art on Rounds: Research Study of an in-patient oncology unit”, Illness Crisis and Loss. Vol. 8, No. 2, pp. 189-199. Williams, J. (1999) “When Interns Meet Managed Care” [Letter to the Editor]. New York Times, p. 30A. Williams, J., Wood, C., & Cunningham-Warburton, P. (1999) “A Narrative Study of Chemotherapy-Induced Alopecia”. Oncology Nursing Forum. Vol. 26, pp. 1463-1468. Willliams, J. (1999) “Health Policy Tool Kit Helps Students to Get Involved”. ONS Newsletter, 14 (9) p 5.

View pdf - Ericho Communications
by beuo 0 Comments favorite 0 Viewed Download 0 Times

CAN YOU WIN THE PR WAR WITH THE PLAZA, THE PIERRE, THE WALDORF AND THE CHAINS WITH JUST ONE QUESTION? BET YOU $55 MILLION THAT YOU CAN Park Central Hotel with Jericho Communications Category 57: Travel -- Hospitality OVERVIEW: Called by some the "city of excess," New York is the perfect place to ask, "What would you be willing to do for $55 million?" The answers may have raised a few eyebrows, but a sound business strategy explains why the Park Central Hotel asked consumers this outrageous question. The Park Central Hotel was once the "belle of the ball" of the New York City hotel scene. But, over the past two decades, it fell into disrepair and took on a tarnished reputation. In an effort to attract a more upscale customer and capture a greater share of Manhattan's booming business hospitality market, management decided to re-invent the property by sinking $55 million into it. Jericho created a publicity program that moved news of the renovation off the travel trade pages and into the popular consumer media -- raising awareness for the property, along with those uplifted eyebrows. PLANNING: The objective of the program was to: * Increase visibility for the Park Central Hotel, and generate awareness for the property's $55 million renovation To do this, the following strategies were employed: * Conduct original research playing off the number $55 million * Create an entertaining news story that ties into topical issues and highlights the Park Central Hotel name Park Central's target audiences were: * Current and potential Park Central Hotel guests, particularly business travelers * Consumer-oriented print and broadcast media, as conduits to above audiences.

Cad Outsourcing
by geninfosolutions 0 Comments favorite 19 Viewed Download 0 Times

GENINFO endeavours to be a leading work share partner to the global AEC industry. We provide value-added design support solutions evolving from outsourcing of computer aided design (CAD) conversions, documentation, 3D modeling and Building Information Modeling (BIM) services to the architecture, engineering, and construction (AEC) segments. http://geninfosolutions.com/

North American Healthcare IT Market worth

This report studies the North America healthcare information technology market (2012 to2017). High costs, disorganized and inefficient delivery systems, high medical and medication error rates, poor communication and care coordination, lack of information support for effective decision-making, and counterproductive payment incentives characterize the present state of healthcare systems. Hence, the need for IT has evolved, as it has the potential to improve workflow, safety, and efficiency within healthcare organizations. The ability to capture, store, exchange, and analyze medical information in electronic form will improve healthcare in many ways. Healthcare IT provides benefits such as improved patient care, increased engagement of patient in healthcare, improved population-based knowledge, development of new tools for medicine, and augmented administrative efficiency. In this report, the North American HCIT market is segmented on the basis of its application, delivery mode, and component. The North American HCIT market, by application is segmented into provider (clinical information technology and non-clinical information technology) and payer, while the market by delivery mode is further categorized as on-premises, web-premises, and cloud-premises. The healthcare information technology by component comprises of hardware, software, and services.

Patient Advisory for Stem Cell Therapy and Medical Tourism

August 2013 Patient Advisory for Stem Cell Therapy and Medical Tourism As stakeholders in cellular therapy, the undersigned professional organizations believe it is necessary to share the following important message with patients and families contemplating cell therapy or experimental stem cell procedures. In this document, best practices are outlined to assist patients and family members in their healthcare decisions. Controlled innovation in the context of patient safety is paramount as potential therapeutic products or procedures are researched, tested, advanced and proven. Our organizations have received questions and concerns from patients and this document presents an opportunity to address them. Introduction Advancement of clinical therapies is best done in the setting of rigorous and formal clinical trials and in a structured regulatory framework. This helps assure that safety considerations, professional peer review, and the management of patient rights and obligations are considered and addressed. Some procedures would be considered standard of care, because scientific studies have shown that they are safe and effective. Not all procedures offered to patients in all regions of the world are tested in this manner and not all geographical regions have regulations for cellular therapies or patient protection. Additionally, it is possible that some practitioners may offer stem cell procedures without following the existing regulations. Patients may be seeking treatment for incurable, potentially untreatable diseases and may be susceptible to false promises or may not have access to all of the information needed to make this important decision. As patients and families contemplate voluntarily ...

Cardiac Stem Cell Therapy and the Promise of Heart Regeneration

Perspective Cardiac Stem Cell Therapy and the Promise of Heart Regeneration Jessica C. Garbern1 and Richard T. Lee2,* 1Department of Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA Stem Cell Institute, the Brigham Regenerative Medicine Center and the Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA *Correspondence: rlee@partners.org http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.stem.2013.05.008 2Harvard Stem cell therapy for cardiac disease is an exciting but highly controversial research area. Strategies such as cell transplantation and reprogramming have demonstrated both intriguing and sobering results. Yet as clinical trials proceed, our incomplete understanding of stem cell behavior is made evident by numerous unresolved matters, such as the mechanisms of cardiomyocyte turnover or the optimal therapeutic strategies to achieve clinical efficacy. In this Perspective, we consider how cardiac stem cell biology has led us into clinical trials, and we suggest that achieving true cardiac regeneration in patients may ultimately require resolution of critical controversies in experimental cardiac regeneration. Introduction The race is on: throughout the world, basic and clinical investigators want to be the first to identify new approaches to regenerate cardiac tissue and to prove the effects of these therapies in patients with heart disease. Despite substantial progress in treating many types of heart disease, the worldwide heart failure burden will remain enormous through this century. The potential of stem cells and the scope of the heart failure problem have fueled a stampede to be the first to achieve human heart regeneration. Cell transplantation approaches are attractive given their...

Patient Handbook on Stem Cell Therapies - A Closer Look at Stem ...

W e have all heard about the extraordinary promise that stem cell research holds for the treatment of a wide range of diseases and conditions. However, there is a lot of work still needed to take this research and turn it into safe and effective treatments. The International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) is very concerned that stem cell therapies are being sold around the world before they have been proven safe and effective. Stem cell therapies are nearly all new and experimental. In these early stages, they may not work, and there may be downsides. Make sure you understand what to look out for before considering a stem cell therapy. Remember, most medical discoveries are based on years of research performed at universities and companies. There is a long process that shows first in laboratory studies and then in clinical research that something is safe and will work. Like a new drug, stem cell therapies must be assessed and meet certain standards before receiving approval from national regulatory bodies to be used to treat people. What does this really mean for you as a patient, doctor, friend or family member? Below we hope to answer some of your questions on stem cells and stem cell therapies and give you the resources you and your doctor need to make the best decisions possible for treatment. The ISSCR is a non-profit professional stem cell research organization with a commitment to ensure the promise of stem cell research is delivered to patients in a safe, effective and fair manner.

Grafix® Demonstrates Overwhelming Efficacy in Landmark Stem ...

Grafix® Demonstrates Overwhelming Efficacy in Landmark Stem Cell Study for the Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcers Grafix closes three times as many wounds as standard of care - the largest relative improvement ever reported in a multi-center, randomized, controlled clinical trial for DFU COLUMBIA, Md. - August 13,2013 - Osiris Therapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ: OSIR), reported today that its multicenter, randomized, controlled clinical trial comparing the safety and effectiveness of Grafix® to standard of care in patients with chronic diabetic foot ulcers had met the pre-specified stopping rules for overwhelming efficacy as determined by the data monitoring committee during a planned interim analysis. For the primary endpoint, 62% of patients receiving Grafix had complete wound closure compared to only 21% (p<0.0001) of patients who received conventional treatment for their wounds - a relative improvement of 191% and the largest ever reported from such a study. A total of 131 patients were enrolled with the interim analysis being conducted on the first 97 to complete the trial. The trial also reached statistical significance in favor of Grafix on all top-line secondary endpoints, demonstrating faster wound closure and a reduction in the number of treatments needed to achieve wound closure. In the crossover phase of the trial, patients whose wounds failed to close after 12 weeks of standard of care had an 80% closure rate when switched to Grafix. Importantly, patients randomized to receive standard of care were 74% more likely to experience an adverse event than those receiving Grafix (p=0.008). As a result, the blinded phase of the trial is being discontinued immediately and all patients randomized to the control arm will be offered treatment with Grafix. “Today, Osiris has established a new standard in diabetic wound care and has demonstrated to the world the tremendous impact stem cell products can have in medicine,” said C. Randal Mills, Ph.D., Chief Executive Officer. “Diabetic foot ulcers afflict 25% of all diabetics and are responsible for more hospitalizations than any other diabetic complication. With 25 million diabetics in the United States, the cost to our health care system is enormous. Through this rigorous study we have shown that Grafix can heal more patients, in less time, and with fewer complications.”

Study shows stem cell therapy using a patient's own bone marrow ...

TIME study mirrors Late TIME trial in confirming autologous stem cells obtained from bone marrow are safe but do not further improve the recovery of heart function following a heart attack MINNEAPOLIS, MN – November 6, 2012 – Administering autologous stem cells obtained from bone marrow either 3 or 7 days following a heart attack did not improve heart function six months later, reports a new clinical trial supported by the National Institutes of Health. The results of this trial, called TIME (Transplantation In Myocardial Infarction Evaluation), were presented by Jay Traverse, MD of the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation Tuesday, Nov. 6, at the 2012 Scientific Sessions of the American Heart Association in Los Angeles. The results of this trial mirror a previous, related study (LateTIME) which found that autologous bone marrow stem cell therapy given 2-3 weeks after a heart attack did not improve cardiac recovery. Both TIME and LateTIME were carried out by the Cardiovascular Cell Therapy Research Network (CCTRN), sponsored by the NIH’s National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. “The data presented by TIME do much to advance stem cell therapy research,” said Jay Traverse, MD of the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation and Principal Investigator of this study. “While this study did not provide a demonstrated cardiac benefit after six months, we still learned a great deal. Together, TIME and Late TIME have shown that stem cell therapy is safe, and they have set a baseline in terms of quantity of stem cells, type of stem cells, and severity of heart attack.” TIME enrolled 120 volunteers (avg. age 57) between July 2008 and February 2011; the participants all had moderate to severe impairment in their left ventricle and had undergone coronary stent placement as treatment for the heart attack. The participants were randomly assigned to one of four groups: day 3 stem cell, day 3 placebo (inactive cells), day 7 stem cell, or day 7 placebo. The CCTRN researchers developed a method of processing and purifying the stem cells from the bone marrow of each volunteer to ensure everyone received a uniform dose (150 million stem cells)...

« previous  123456789