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Asia Pacific Disc Brake Market
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Asia-Pacific Disc Brake market is expected to reach $7.9 Billion by 2018 according to a new report by MicroMarket Monitor.

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FortiGate System Administration Guide - Fortinet Document Library

Trademarks Copyright© 2012 Fortinet, Inc. All rights reserved. Fortinet®, FortiGate®, and FortiGuard®, are registered trademarks of Fortinet, Inc., and other Fortinet names herein may also be trademarks of Fortinet. All other product or company names may be trademarks of their respective owners. Performance metrics contained herein were attained in internal lab tests under ideal conditions, and performance may vary. Network variables, different network environments and other conditions may affect performance results. Nothing herein represents any binding commitment by Fortinet, and Fortinet disclaims all warranties, whether express or implied, except to the extent Fortinet enters a binding written contract, signed by Fortinet’s General Counsel, with a purchaser that expressly warrants that the identified product will perform according to the performance metrics herein. For absolute clarity, any such warranty will be limited to performance in the same ideal conditions as in Fortinet’s internal lab tests. Fortinet disclaims in full any guarantees. Fortinet reserves the right to change, modify, transfer, or otherwise revise this publication without notice, and the most current version of the publication shall be applicable. Visit these links for more information and documentation for your Fortinet products: Fortinet Knowledge Base - http://kb.fortinet.com Technical Documentation - http://docs.fortinet.com Training Services - http://campus.training.fortinet.com Technical Support - http://support.fortinet.com You can report errors or omissions in this or any Fortinet technical document to techdoc@fortinet.com.

Structural modelling and analysis using BIM tools - Aalborg Universitet

Structural modelling and analysis using BIM tools Master of Science in Civil Engineering The School of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University Anne Kathrine Nielsen & Søren Madsen Faculties of Engineering, Science and Medicine The School of Civil Engineering Aalborg University Sohngaardsholmsvej 57 DK-9000 Aalborg Phone +45 9940 8530 http://bsn.aau.dk Title: Structural modelling and analysis using BIM tools Theme: Master’s Thesis Project period: 1st of February to the 9th of June 2010 Synopsis: This study will focus on the structural engineering part in the detail design phase of the building process. Different S-BIM tools are evaluated through analyses of five structures with varying complexity, different section properties, geometry, material properties and so on. The S-BIM tools evaluated are: Made by: Anne Kathrine Nielsen Søren Madsen Supervisor: Poul Henning Kirkegaard Editions: 3 Number of pages: 81 Appendices: 7 • Add-on tool for Revit Structure • Direct link between Revit and Robot • Direct link between Revit and StaadPro • Indirect link between Revit and Robot via IFC The Revit add-on tool tested can be rather useful for calculating section forces and deflection in feasibility studies if a ’load-takedown’ feature is introduced. It is found that the direct links in general are best. Regarding timber structures, the link between Revit and Robot works better than the link between Revit and StaadPro. The tested IFC exchange file format, IFC Coordination View, was not found suitable for the tests performed in this study. Completed: 9th of June 2010 The content of the report is freely available, but publication (with source reference) is only allowed with agreement by the author. Preface This study is conducted at the 4th semester of the Master of Science Programme in Civil Engineering at Aalborg University. The title of the project is Structural modelling and analysis using BIM tools. The report has been composed in the period from the 1st of February 2010 to the 9th of June 2010. The study has been supervised by Associate Professor Poul Henning Kirkegaard. The authors would like to thank: • Elizabeth Shulok from Structural Integrators for technical support to the software application SI Xchange for Revit and STAAD. • Rambøll in Aalborg for providing digital models of the House of Music in Aalborg, Denmark. In extension to this report a CD-ROM containing the employed models is enclosed. In the report the CD-ROM is referred to when relevant. The contents of the enclosed CD-ROM are listed in Appendix A.

Cisco Connected World-International Mobile Security Study

International Mobile Security Study Organizations across the globe are looking for the best way to provide workers with secure “anytime, anywhere, any device” network access. To help IT administrators and the businesses they serve better understand the attitudes and experiences of mobile users in the enterprise with special attention to security, we conducted a survey of more than 4600 end users across 10 countries. Blurred Lines High Expectations 90% of end users say it is important to have similar access and experience on both company and personal devices. Over half of the end users said company devices should be for both work and play. Key Finding: Using personal devices at work has become common and there is an expectation to have a similar experience across all devices. Remote Working A privilege or right? 53% Not-So-Seamless Access 50% have remote access but cite frustration such as access to information is restricted. consider it a privilege, though most end users in China and India believe it is a right. 60% when remote they borrow someone else’s wireless connection at least sometimes. (Of note: 50% from India report borrowing other’s connection all the time.) Key Finding: More than half of end users report that they have the ability to connect seamlessly to their corporate network from any location and at any time.

The Cisco Connected World Technology Report

Timing and Sample Qualifications • This report discusses the findings for 1,441 College Students (age 18–24) and 1,412 Employees (21–29) who completed an online survey between May 13 and June 8, 2011. • The survey was translated and fielded in 14 countries to gain approximately 100 completes for each subgroup in each country (~200 total completes per country). • Countries: United States, Canada, Mexico, Brazil, United Kingdom, France, Spain, Germany, Italy, Russia, India, China, Japan, Australia • Respondents were screened to meet the following criteria: – College Graduate or Higher – Employed Full Time in a Non-IT role – Does not work for a company in the Market Research or Non Profit Industry – Works for an organization that employs 10+ people worldwide • Quotas were set to ensure an even distribution of completes by gender. Subgroup Analysis • Statistical differences between country subgroups were tested at the 95% confidence level and are indicated with capital letters in the analysis that follows. © 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 2 © 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 3 The Internet Students and Young Professionals share similar perceptions on the importance of the Internet. For most, accessing the Internet through their computer is their primary information and news source and an integral part of their daily life. • Roughly half of Students (49%) and End Users (47%) consider the Internet to be ‗close‘ in importance to water, food, air, and shelter in their lives; and one-third of respondents in each subgroup consider the Internet to be as important as these critical needs.

Gen Y: New Dawn for work, play, identity - Cisco

... Korea, India, China, Japan, Australia. THE THIRD ANNUAL CISCO CONNECTED WORLD TECHNOLOGY REPORT. COLLEGE STUDENTS and WORKERS. The survey was translated into local languages and conducted in August 2012 across 18 countries to gain approximately 100 completes for each subgroup in each country 18 Countries: United States, Canada, Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Netherlands, Russia, Poland, Turkey, South Africa, Korea, India, China, Japan, Australia Smartphones rival laptops as a preferred device by Gen Y. 60% of Gen Y compulsively check their smart phones for emails, texts or social media updates. Over two out of five would feel “anxious, like part of me was missing” if they couldn’t check their smart phones constantly. Two out of three spend equal or more time online with friends than in person If you had to choose only one device, what would it be?favored laptops preferred smartphone Smartphones rated twice as popular as desktop PC And three times as popular as a tablet.

2011 Cisco Connected World Technology Report

• In Fall 2010, Cisco Systems partnered with InsightExpress for the execution of a research initiative that effectively gathered insights and feedback across End User and ITDM populations in 12 countries. • Overall, the research was targeted towards understanding the challenges companies face in an increasingly mobile and security risk-prone world. • In support of these efforts, the following investigation explores similar issues among a younger demographic—End Users and College Students between 18–29 years old. © 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 3 Timing and Sample Qualifications • This report discusses the findings for 1,441 College Students (age 18–24) and 1,412 End Users (21–29) who completed an online survey between May 13 and June 8, 2011. • The survey was translated into local languages and fielded in 14 countries to gain approximately 100 completes for each subgroup in each country (~200 total completes per country). • End Users were screened to meet the following criteria: – College Graduate or Higher – Employed Full Time in a Non-IT role – Does not work for a company in the Market Research or Non Profit Industry – Works for an organization that employs 10+ people worldwide • Quotas were set to ensure an even distribution of completes by gender. Subgroup Analysis • Statistical differences between country subgroups were tested at the 95% confidence level and are indicated with capital letters in the analysis that follows. © 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 4 © 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. 5

Aibo - the No.1 selling service robot - Dr. Joanne Pransky World's ...

1999 marked the first year that the prestigious World Robotics, a one-of-a-kind annual publication put together by the Economic Commission for Europe (ECE) and the International Federation of Robotics (IFR), included a survey on service robots. Included in this premier report were entertainment robots, which, coupled with a few other new service robot classifications, were forecast to total 1,000 installations for the period 19992002. This prediction was surpassed ± five times the forecast amount ± in just four days in June 1999 by one robot alone ± the AIBO entertainment robot. Further, what no one was able to predict, including Sony Corporation, the manufacturer, was that the AIBO also broke all records for the greatest amount of robots sold in the shortest amount of time. The first run of 5,000 AIBOs, the ERS-110, was met with an overwhelming response ± one that almost broke Sony's Webserver: 3,000 sold out in Japan in 20 minutes on the Internet and the remaining 2,000, made available only in the USA, were all sold on the Internet within four days.

Japanese Animation Guide: The History of Robot Anime - Tohno chan

Addition to the Release of this Report This report on robot anime was prepared based on information available through 2012, and at that time, with the exception of a handful of long-running series (Gundam, Macross, Evangelion, etc.) and some kiddie fare, no original new robot anime shows debuted at all. But as of today that situation has changed, and so I feel the need to add two points to this document. At the start of the anime season in April of 2013, three all-new robot anime series debuted. These were Production I.G.'s “Gargantia on the Verdurous Planet," Sunrise's “Valvrave the Liberator," and Dogakobo and Orange's “Majestic Prince of the Galactic Fleet." Each was broadcast in a late-night timeslot and succeeded in building fanbases. The second new development is the debut of the director Guillermo Del Toro's film “Pacific Rim," which was released in Japan on August 9, 2013. The plot involves humanity using giant robots controlled by human pilots to defend Earth’s cities from gigantic “kaiju.” At the end of the credits, the director dedicates the film to the memory of “monster masters” Ishiro Honda (who oversaw many of the “Godzilla” films) and Ray Harryhausen (who pioneered stop-motion animation techniques.) The film clearly took a great deal of inspiration from Japanese robot anime shows. The separate “Survey and Report on Japanese Tokusatsu,” which was prepared in parallel with this report, explained the deep connection between “monster-versus-hero" (tokusatsu) productions and robot anime shows. Seeing a major Hollywood production give this unexpected show of respect proves that tokusatsu and robot anime culture are far from being a closed book. All of this serves to remind us of the relevance of the themes explored in this report as they continue to develop, not only domestically but in the form of international cultural exchanges.

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