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contoh sijil spm keputusan 1990

Findability of Commodities by Consumers - Design Research Society

Findability of Commodities by Consumers: Distinguishing Different Packaging Designs Regina W.Y. Wang, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, wyw@mail.ntust.edu.tw Mu-Chien Chou, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology / Chungyu Institute of Technology, f1234860@ms36.hinet.net Abstract What package design features can help consumers find commodities faster? This study assumes that the factors in distinguishing different packaging designs of commodities differ due to consumers’ different personal experiences. Thus, this paper studies the findability of commodities by consumers through distinct packaging designs. It consists mainly of two stages: (a) the first stage reviews the existing literature to determine the application of different package designs; (b) the second stage is a focus group interview designed to investigate the factors influencing consumers in distinguishing different package designs. In the investigation process, (i) samples of package bottles for testing were collected through natural observation and convenience sampling; (ii) a focus group interview was conduced to determine how a consumer recognizes the differences among packages; (iii) a grounded analysis model was employed to transfer and encode the data collected from the focus group interviews to construct a conceptual frame for trade dress and the classifications of trade dress, which can interpret variations in the recognition of packaging design differences. The results of the focus group interview showed that consumers focused more on three kinds of “trade dress”: property of commodity, label design, and bottle shape design when looking for differences in packaging designs. The “bottle shape design” was the most important factor that the focus group used in distinguishing different packaging designs. The distinction in the different package designs by consumers is not limited to design elements (image, language, color, shape, etc.) only; more importantly, the distinction lies in the relationship between “trade dress” and “classifications of trade dress,” which can better reflect the differences in packaging designs. Keywords commodity packaging; differences in packaging design; findability; trade dress. The findability of commodities influences consumer decisions (Brown, 2008). Two-thirds of consumers’ buying decisions are influenced by the packages on the shelf (Lundberg, 2004; Nilsson & Öström, 2005; Rettie & Brewer, 2000). Hence, the kind of packaging that is easy to find is a thesis worth investigating. Packaging gives appeal and provides distinction from other commodities. Furthermore, it stimulates the buyers’ desire for consumption. An effective package design catches consumers’ attention and experience, prolongs lingering time before the shelf, and consequently causes sales opportunity to take place directly (Cheverton, 2004; Doyle, 1996; Mikunda, 2002). Experience in various commodities is connected with brand identity, packaging design on the shelf, and attempt to link with consumers’ personal experiences (Schmitt, 1999). Therefore, design elements such as character, figure, color, brand, shape, size, material, and texture employed effectively by the package designer can create a different package and communication experience (Schmitt & Simonson, 1997; Sonsino, 1990). There are different types of cognition towards the communication design of package comprehension between consumers and designers (Author, 2007). Hence, designers have different preferences in their own design communication owing to their different senses and cognitions of the commodity itself (Antioco, Moenaert, Feinberg, & Wetzels, 2008). This survey investigates the findability of packages. A literature review on packaging design differences is first presented, and the results of the group interview aimed at exploring the factors affecting consumer recognition and distinction of packaging design differences are then discussed...

Fault Diagnosis On Motronic M1.5 Engine Management System

Fault Diagnosis On Motronic M1.5 Engine Management System Introduction From Model Year 1990, when catalytic converters were first fitted to the range, all Senator and Carlton GSi models incorporated the Bosch Motronic M1.5 engine management system. The engines in these models were coded as either C30NE; (The 3.0 Litre 12V engine.) C30SE; (The 3.0 Litre 24Valve engine.) or C26NE (The 2.6 Litre engine.), the ‘C’ indicating the fitment of ‘Cats.’. From experience, the system is very reliable and problems encountered are usually caused by poor contact at the associated plug/socket combinations that link the various system sensors to the Electronic Control Unit (ECU). The electrical diagrams for these vehicles, issued by the manufacturers and others, are poorly presented and can easily cause confusion when attempting to trace a particular element of the engine management system. In consequence, fault finding on the engine electrics can be somewhat frustrating. To improve this situation, Figure 1 on the following page, shows the complete engine management system in detail and includes all connectors and associated wiring, including all direct connections to the ECU. Since the primary purpose of this article is to assist in the location of faults in the Engine Management System, the diagram as been kept as clear as possible, therefore, connections to other peripheral systems e.g. Cruise Control, Ride Height etc. are not shown. This particularly applies to outputs from the Distance Sensor (P14) which, from Pin 2, supplies an output to many of these associated circuits. However, if the Tacho meter is operating correctly, it can be safely assumed that P14 is also giving the correct output signal. When a possible fault has been deduced by reference to Figure 1, then it can be confirmed by checking for satisfactory signal levels at the relevant pins of the ECU Table 1, lists each pin of the ECU, in numerical order, and the expected ‘Satisfactory Readings’ under specified ‘Engine/Ignition’ conditions, when measured with respect to an associated ‘Ground Reference Pin’. Details on how to access the ‘Related Blink Codes’, that are given in the last column of Table 1, is the concluding part of this article. Measurement of Signal Level On ECU Pins . To gain access to the ECU, remove the plastic cover panel, located in the drivers foot well, at the outer side of the vehicle. Access to the relevant pins of the ECU for measurement is the n achieved by releasing the screws securing the rear cover of the connecting plug then carefully removing it to expose the rear of the pins. The following illustration shows the pin layout of this connector. All measurements must be made using a digital multimeter or portable oscilloscope, as appropriate, pressing the instrument probes between the pin to be measured and the ‘Associated Reference Pin’, given along side it, in Table 1. CAUTION: Do not use a simple analogue multimeter as, in some circumstances, it would ‘load’ the ECU circuit under test, giving a false reading...

Roger S. Ulrich, “Health Benefits of Gardens in Hospitals.”

Paper for conference, Plants for People International Exhibition Floriade 2002 Health Benefits of Gardens in Hospitals Roger S. Ulrich, Ph.D. Center for Health Systems and Design Colleges of Architecture and Medicine Texas A & M University College State, TX 77843 INTRODUCTION This paper selectively reviews scientific research on the influences of gardens and plants in hospitals and other healthcare settings. The discussion concentrates mainly on health-related benefits that patients realize by simply looking at gardens and plants, or in other ways passively experiencing healthcare surroundings where plants are prominent. The review also briefly addresses other advantages of gardens and plants in hospitals, such as lowering the costs of delivering healthcare and improving staff satisfaction. It might be asked at the outset: why is worthwhile to focus exclusively on gardens located in hospitals and other healthcare facilities? One important reason is linked to the fact that extraordinary amounts of money are spent internationally for construction of healthcare environments. This funding for hospitals potentially represents a major source of resources for gardens, plants, and related features such as atriums. Consider the example of only one large medical complex in the United States, the Texas Medical Center in Houston, which plans to spend about $1.8 billion on new construction during the next two years. In the State of California alone, new spending for hospital buildings will be upwards of $14 billion by 2010. Even individual buildings can be extremely costly -- Northwestern University’s recently opened main hospital in Chicago cost $687 million. Spending in the United States for new hospitals has averaged about $15 billion annually during the last decade. The United Kingdom plans to spend at least $4 billion on new hospital construction within the next three years or so. When substantial additional spending is considered for the many other types of healthcare environments -- for example, nursing homes, primary care clinics, rehabilitation facilities -- it becomes even clearer that healthcare design and construction directly accounts for vast amounts of money. This reality implies great opportunities for funding and creating new gardens to enrich and improve the lives of patients and the environments of hundreds, if not thousands, of existing medical facilities. 2 Background: Gardens and Hospital Design The belief that plants and gardens are beneficial for patients in healthcare environments is more than one thousand years old, and appears prominently in Asian and Western cultures (Ulrich and Parsons, 1992). During the Middle Ages in Europe, for example, monasteries created elaborate gardens to bring pleasant, soothing distraction to the ill (Gierlach-Spriggs et al., 1998). European and American hospitals in the 1800s commonly contained gardens and plants as prominent features (Nightingale, 1860). Gardens became less prevalent in hospitals during the early decades of the 1900s, however, as major advances in medical science caused hospital administrators and architects to concentrate on creating healthcare buildings that would reduce infection risk and serve as functionally efficient settings for new medical technology. The strong emphasis on infection reduction, together with the priority given to functional efficiency, shaped the design of hundreds of major hospitals internationally -- that are now considered starkly institutional, unacceptably stressful, and unsuited to the emotional needs of patients, their families, and even healthcare staff (Ulrich, 1991; Horsburgh, 1995). Despite the intense stress often caused by illness, pain, and traumatic hospital experiences, little attention was given to creating environments that would calm patients or otherwise address emotional needs (Ulrich, 2001). A growing awareness has developed in recent years in the healthcare community of the need to create functionally efficient and hygienic environments that also have pleasant, stress reducing characteristics. An important impetus for this awareness has been the major progress achieved in mind-body medical science. A substantial body of research has now demonstrated that stress and psychosocial factors can significantly affect patient health outcomes. This knowledge strongly implies that the psychological or emotional needs of patients be given high priority along with traditional concerns, including infection risk exposure and functional efficiency, in governing the design of hospitals (Ulrich, 2001). It also follows that conditions or experiences shown by medical researchers to be stress reducing and healthful, such as pleasant soothing distractions and social support, must become important considerations in creating new healthcare facilities. The fact that there is limited but growing scientific evidence that viewing gardens can measurably reduce patient stress and improve health outcomes has been a key factor in the major resurgence in interest internationally in providing gardens in hospitals and other healthcare facilities. Importance of Health Outcomes Evidence Healthcare administrators everywhere are under strong pressures to control or reduce costs yet increase care quality. Faced with imperative demands such as paying for costly new medical technology, administrators may often consider gardens as desirable but nonessential. Convincing the medical community to assign priority and resources usually requires providing credible evidence that gardens or plants produce benefits yet are cost-effective compared to alternatives, including not providing gardens/plants. 3 It should be emphasized here that most healthcare administrators and especially physicians consider evidence from health outcomes research to provide the most sound and persuasive basis for assessing whether a particular medical treatment or service (here providing a garden or plants) is medically beneficial and financially sensible. (Ulrich, 1999, 2002). Health outcomes are numerous and varied, but most refer to measures of a patient’s medical condition or to indicators of healthcare quality. These measures include (1) observable clinical signs or medical measures, (2) subjective measures such as reported satisfaction, and (2) economic measures (Ulrich, 2002). • Clinical indicators that are observable signs and symptoms relating to patients’ conditions. (Examples: length of stay, blood pressure, intake of pain drugs) • Patient/staff reported outcomes. (Examples: patient reports of satisfaction with healthcare services, staff reported satisfaction with working conditions) • Economic outcomes. (Examples: cost of patient care, recruitment or hiring costs due to staff turnover) Clinical and economic outcomes data traditionally have carried the greatest weight in decisions, but in recent years evidence regarding effects of treatments or services on patient satisfaction has gained much importance as healthcare providers in the United States and Europe have faced mounting pressures to become more patient or consumer oriented. STRESS REDUCING EFFECTS OF VIEWING PLANTS AND NATURE Several studies of nonpatient groups (such as university students) as well as patients have consistently shown that simply looking at environments dominated by greenery, flowers, or water -- as compared to built scenes lacking nature (rooms, buildings, towns) -- is significantly more effective in promoting recovery or restoration from stress. (See Ulrich, 1999, for a survey of studies.) A limited amount of research suggests that viewing settings with plants or other nature for a few minutes can promote measurable restoration even in hospital patients who are acutely stressed. There is considerable evidence that restorative effects of nature scenes are manifested within only three to five minutes as a combination of psychological/emotional and physiological changes. Concerning the first, psychological/emotional, many views of vegetation or garden-like features elevate levels of positive feelings (pleasantness, calm), and reduce negatively toned emotions such as fear, anger, and sadness. Certain nature scenes effectively sustain interest and attention, and accordingly can serve as pleasant distractions that may diminish stressful thoughts. Regarding physiological manifestations of stress recovery, laboratory and clinical investigations have found that viewing nature settings can produce significant restoration within less than five minutes as indicated by positive changes, for instance, in blood pressure, heart activity, muscle tension, and brain electrical activity (Ulrich, 1981; Ulrich et al., 1991). 4 One controlled experiment, for example, measured a battery of physiological responses in 120 stressed persons (non-patients) who were randomly assigned to a recovery period consisting of one of six different videotapes of either nature settings (vegetation or vegetation with water) or built settings lacking nature (Ulrich et al., 1991). Findings from four continuously recorded physiological measures (blood pressure, heart rate, skin conductance, muscle tension) were consistent in indicating that recuperation from stress was faster and much more complete when individuals were exposed to the nature settings rather than any of the built environments. The quickness of nature-induced restoration was manifested as significant changes in all physiological measures within about three minutes. The pattern of physiological data further supported the interpretation that nature, compared to the built settings, more effectively lowered activity in the sympathetic nervous system. (Heightened sympathetic nervous system activity involves energy consuming mobilization or arousal and is central in stress responding.) Moreover, data from self-reports of feelings indicated that the nature environments likewise produced substantially more recuperation in the psychological component of stress. Persons exposed to the settings with plants and other nature, in contrast to the built environments, had lower levels of fear and anger, and reported far higher levels of positive feelings (Ulrich et al., 1991). Hartig (1991) also used both physiological and psychological measures to study restoration in non-patient subjects who were stressed because they either had driven an automobile through urban traffic or completed a series of difficult tests. His findings were broadly similar to those described above -- more specifically, blood pressure data and emotional self-reports converged to indicate that recovery was appreciably greater if persons looked at a nature setting dominated by vegetation rather than a built environment without nature (Hartig, 1991). Nakamura and Fujii have carried out two studies in Japan (1990, 1992) that measured brain wave activity as unstressed persons (non-patients) looked either at plants or human-made objects. In an intriguing first experiment, the researchers analyzed alpha rhythm activity as subjects viewed: two types of potted plants, each with and without flowers (Pelargonium and Begonia); the same pots without plants; or a cylinder similar to the pots (Nakamura and Fujii, 1990). Results suggested that persons were most wakefully relaxed when they observed plants with flowers, and least relaxed when they looked at pots without plants. In the second study they recorded the electroencephalogram (EEG) while persons were seated in a real outdoor setting and viewed a hedge of greenery, a concrete fence with dimensions similar to the hedge, or a mixed condition consisting of part greenery and part concrete (Nakamura and Fujii, 1992). The EEG data supported the conclusion that the greenery elicited relaxation whereas the concrete had stressful influences. Benefits of Nature and Gardens in Healthcare Settings The research examples described above, all based on non-patient groups, indicate that visual exposure to plants and other nature lasting only a few minutes can foster considerable restoration or recovery from stress. 5 It is important to emphasize that broadly parallel findings have been obtained when stressed patients in healthcare settings have been visually exposed to nature. A study by Heerwagen and Orians, for instance, found that anxious patients in a dental fears clinic were less stressed on days when a large nature mural was hung on a wall of the waiting room in contrast to days when the wall was blank (Heerwagen, 1990). The restorative benefits of the nature scene were evident both in heart rate data and selfreports of emotional states. In the case of hospitals and other healthcare facilities, there is mounting evidence that gardens function are especially effective and beneficial settings with respect to fostering restoration for stressed patients, family members, and staff (Ulrich, 1999). Cooper-Marcus and Barnes (1995) used a combination of behavioral observation and interview methods to evaluate four hospital gardens in California. They found that restoration from stress, including improved mood, was by far the most important category of benefits derived by nearly all users of the gardens -- patients, family, and employees. Likewise, a recent study of a garden in a children’s hospital identified mood improvement and restoration from stress as primary benefits for users (Whitehouse et al., 2001). This conclusion was supported by convergent results from behavioral observations, interviews, and surveys. The fact that stress is a pervasive, welldocumented, and very important health-related problem in hospitals implies major significance for the finding that restoration is the key benefit motivating persons to use gardens in healthcare facilities (Ulrich, 1999). Well-designed hospital gardens not only provide calming and pleasant nature views, but can also reduce stress and improve clinical outcomes through other mechanisms, for instance, fostering access to social support and privacy, and providing opportunities for escape from stressful clinical settings (Ulrich, 1999; Cooper-Marcus and Barnes, 1995). Concerning the last of these, escape, Cooper-Marcus and Barnes (1995) concluded that many healthcare employees used gardens as an effective means for achieving a restorative pleasant escape from work stress and aversive conditions in the hospital. They also included in their report statements by several patients which suggested that the gardens fostered restoration in part by providing positive escape (and sense of control) with respect to stress. For example, a patient interviewed in a hospital garden commented: “It’s a good escape from what they put me through. I come out here between appointments. . I feel much calmer, less stressed” (Cooper-Marcus and Barnes, 1995, p. 27). In addition to ameliorating stress and improving mood, gardens and nature in hospitals can significantly heighten satisfaction with the healthcare provider and the overall quality of care. Evidence from studies of a number of different hospitals and diverse categories of patients (adults, children, and elderly patients; ambulatory or outpatient settings, inpatient acute care wards) strongly suggests that the presence of nature -- indoor and outdoor gardens, plants, window views of nature -- increases both patient and family satisfaction (Cooper-Marcus and Barnes, 1995; Whitehouse et al., 2001; Picker Institute and Center for Health Design, 1999)...

Tips Mengerjakan Soal Barisan dan Teks

Tips mengerjakan soal TPA (Bagian 3 : Barisan dan Wacana) Barisan adalah sekelompok bilangan yang disusun menurut pola atau aturan tertentu. Kita mengenal beberapa barisan, yaitu : 1. Barisan Aritmetika : un = a + (n-1)b Barisan yang memiliki beda atau selisih yang tetap diantara dua suku yang berurutan. Contoh : 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, .. Beda barisan di atas = 2 4 – 2 = 6 – 4 = 8 – 6 = 10 – 8 = 2 2. Barisan Geometri : un = a ⋅ rn-1 Barisan yang memiliki rasio atau pembanding yang tetap diantara dua suku berurutan. Contoh : 1, 3, 9, 27, 81, .. Rasio barisan di atas = 3 3 9 27 81 3 9 27 1 3 3. Barisan Fibonacci (sering keluar di SNMPTN) : un = un-2 + un-1 Barisan bilangan dimana suku berikutnya adalah jumlah dua suku sebelumnya. Contoh : 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, … 1+1=2 1+2=3 2+3=5 3+5=8 8 + 13 = 21 dan seterusnya 4. Barisan bujursangkar (barisan kuadrat) : un = n2 Contoh : 1, 4, 9, 16, 25, 36, … 5. Barisan persegi panjang : un = n(n+1) Contoh : 2, 6, 12, 20, 30, 42, … ...

http://statistikapendidikan.com Copyright © 2013 ...

Analisis Data Statistik Dengan Proram SPSS Lisensi Dokumen: Copyright © 2013 StatistikaPendidikan.Com Seluruh dokumen di StatistikaPendidikan.Com dapat digunakan, dimodifikasi dan disebarkan secara bebas untuk tujuan bukan komersial (nonprofit), dengan syarat tidak menghapus atau merubah atribut penulis dan pernyataan copyright yang disertakan Pendahuluan SPSS merupakan software statistic yang pada awalnya di gunakan untuk riset di bidang social (SPSS saat itu adalah singkatan dari Statistic Pacage for the Social Science). Sejalan dengan perkembangan SPSS di gunakan untuk melayani berbagai jenis user sehingga sekarang singkatan dari Statistical product and Service Solutions. Penjelasan Proses Statistika dengan SPSS: Data yang akan diproses di masukkan lewat menu DATA EDITOR yang otomatis muncul di layer saat SPSS di jalankan, setelah itu data yang di input kemudian dip roses, juga lewat menu DATA EDITOR. Hasil pengolahan dan muncul di layer yang lain dari SPSS yaitu OUTPUT NAVIGATOR. Asal SPSS Pada 1968, Norman H. Nie, C. Hadlai (Tex) Hull dan Dale H. Bent, tiga orang pemuda dari latar belakang profesional berbeda, memperkembangkan sistem perangkat halus yang berdasarkan gagasan statistika menggunakan untuk mengubah data mentah (RAW) menjadi informasi esensial untuk membuat keputusan. Sistem perangkat halus statistik revolusioner ini disebut SPSS, yang menjadi calon Statistical Package untuk Ilmu Pengetahuan Sosial. Nie, Hull dan Bent membangun SPSS dari keperluan untuk dengan cepat menganalisa volume data ilmu pengetahuan sosial yang dikumpulkan lewat berbagai metode penelitian. Dilakukan kerja pertama di SPSS di Stanford University dengan maksud untuk membuatnya tersedia hanya untuk konsumsi lokal dan tak ada distribusi internasional. Nie, seorang ilmuwan sosial dan Stanford doktoral calon, mengambil target sasaran dan menetapkan kebutuhan (requirements); Bent, doktoral calon Stanford University pada penelitian pelaksanaan, mempunyai keahlian analisa dan mendesain struktur berkas sistem SPSS; dan Hull, yang baru tamat dari Stanford dengan gelar MBA-nya, memprogram SPSS...

TENNESSEE
by momontox 0 Comments favorite 23 Viewed Download 0 Times

nationalatlas.gov INDIANA Precipitation varies widely across the United States, from a low of 2.3 inches per year in California's Death Valley to a high of 460 inches on Hawaii's Mount Waialeale. Nevada ranks as the driest state, with an average annual precipitation of 9.5 inches, and Hawaii is the wettest, at 70.3 inches. The average annual precipitation for Tennessee is 52.98 inches. Average Annual Precipitation (in inches) 1961-1990 ILLINOIS WEST VIRGINIA KENTUCKY MISSOURI VIRGINIA 180.1-200 Lake Barkley Dale Hollow Lake AR Mi ss 30.1-35 25.1-30 R D uc Hatc hie B u ff 20.1-25 rl a n d a lo 15.1-20...

Surficial Geologic and Liquefaction Susceptibility Mapping in Shelby ...

Surficial Geologic and Liquefaction Susceptibility Mapping in Shelby County, Tennessee Abstract Geologic maps were made of the Northeast Memphis, Ellendale, and Germantown 7.5’ quadrangles (1:24,000) in Shelby County, Tennessee. Liquefaction susceptibilities were then assigned to the mapped geologic units based on previously published empirical data. Liquefaction susceptibility determinations from borehole blow count data for this same area strongly supports the geology based liquefaction susceptibility maps. However, the geologic maps provide greater detail. The geology based liquefaction susceptibility maps, supported by geotechnical data, appear to be a valuable contribution to liquefaction hazard maps in Shelby County, Tennessee.Introduction The city of Memphis and Shelby County, Tennessee, are located approximately 50 km southeast of the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ), the most hazardous seismic zone in the eastern United States (Johnston and Schweig, 1996) (Fig. 1). Thus, Shelby County and the city of Memphis are exposed to significant seismic hazards. Due to extensive development in the twentieth century, Memphis and Shelby County have become one of the largest urban areas in the south and is the largest distribution center in the United States. A large earthquake occurring anywhere within the NMSZ could cause widespread loss of life, and damage to buildings, bridges, and lifelines in the Memphis area due to ground shaking and soil liquefaction. Seismologic and engineering studies have been conducted to assess the expected ground motion in Shelby County (Sharma and Kovacs, 1980; Hwang et al., 1990; Hwang and Lin, 1997) and liquefaction susceptibility (Ng et al., 1989; Chang et al., 1991; Hwang and Lee, 1992; Tarr and Hwang, 1993; Hwang and Lin, 1997; Hwang et al., 1999) in the event of a large New Madrid earthquake. The most comprehensive liquefaction susceptibility studies of Memphis and Shelby County have been conducted by Ng et al. (1989), Hwang and Lin (1997), and updated by Hwang et al. (1999). Ng et al. (1989) and Hwang and Lin (1997) made liquefaction susceptibility maps of Shelby County by compiling soil boring data. They averaged geologic data, water table depth, and blow count values for all borings within 3 x 3 second cells (approximately 762 m E-W x 914 m N-S) and assigned a liquefaction susceptibility to each cell based on these geotechnical data. This grid-based map and its update (Hwang et al., 1999) provide general liquefaction information for Shelby County, and access to individual boreholes used in the construction of the map would provide site-specific data. However, the rectangular cells impose artificial boundaries between the map units and do not capture the distribution of sedimentary units in Shelby County that can be achieved with detailed geologic mapping. Surficial geologic mapping is an effective means of delineating areas prone to seismic hazards. In particular, surficial geology is the most important factor controlling liquefaction susceptibility (Youd, 1991). Youd and Perkins (1978) have shown that by mapping the surface and near-surface geology, liquefaction susceptibility can be qualitatively assessed (Table 1). No county wide, geology-based liquefaction susceptibility maps have been made of Shelby County. In an earlier NEHRP USGS funded project we mapped the geology of the NW Memphis and Collierville 7.5’ (1:24,000) quadrangles. From these geologic maps, the empirically derived correlations between surficial geologic materials and relative liquefaction susceptibility of Youd and Perkins (Table 1) were used to generate liquefaction susceptibility maps that were supportedby geotechnical data (Broughton et al., 2001)...

2010 Census: Tennessee Profile - U.S. Census Bureau

State Race* Breakdown 2010 Census: Tennessee Profile Black or African American (16.7%) American Indian and Alaska Native (0.3%) Asian (1.4%) Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander (0.1%) White (77.6%) Population Density by Census Tract Some other race (2.2%) Two or more races (1.7%) *One race Hispanic or Latino (of any race) makes up 4.6% of the state population. Population by Sex and Age Total Population: 6,346,105 85+ Years 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 240,000 120,000 0 Male 120,000 240,000 Female Housing Tenure Total Occupied Housing Units: 2,493,552 31.8% Renter Occupied 68.2% Owner Occupied Tennessee Population 1970 to 2010 2010 2000 1990 1980 1970 Average Household Size of Owner-Occupied Units: 6,346,105 5,689,283 4,877,185 4,591,120 3,923,687 2.53 people 2.38 People per Square Mile by Census Tract U.S. density is 88.4 0 0 U.S. Department of Commerce Economics and Statistics Administration U.S. CENSUS BUREAU Average Household Size of Renter-Occupied Units: 20 40 20 60 40 County Boundary 80 Kilometers 60 5,000.0 to 11,344.8 1,000.0 to 4,999.9 200.0 to 999.9 88.4 to 199.9 50.0 to 88.3 15.0 to 49.9 Less than 15.0 80 Miles Tennessee Mean Center of Population people...

Interesting Soccer Facts
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Interesting Soccer Facts You can find many interesting soccer facts if you take a look at the game over the years. Here are a few things you may not know about soccer:Soccer players run an average of six miles during every game. and the Azteca family The Azteca Puebla and the Azteca Acapulco were also members of the Azteca family which were naturally hand-sewn in the Azteca design. 1990: The Etrusco Unico This ball was a high-tech product which was manufactured entirely from quality synthetic fibres. The lowest covering consisted of textiles impregnated with latex for form stability and resistance to tearing, the neoprene layer made me ball water-tight and the outer skin made of polyurethane layers was responsible for abrasion resistance and good rebound properties. The Etrusco Unico was sewn together from 32 individual sections. 2002: Fevernova - vibrant, dynamic and highly accurate A truly revolutionary ball. Experts say that the Fevernova has set a new standard in the sport. It is the most accurate football ever produced by adidas. The improved syntactic foam layer, consisting of highly compressible and extremely durable gas-filled micro-balloons, has remarkable energy return properties and additional cushioning for enhanced control and accuracy. A three-layer knitted chassis gives the Fevernova improved three-dimensional performance characteristics, allowing for a more precise and predictable flight path every time. Extensive tests with robots in the adidas football laboratory provide proof of the unprecedented accuracy of the Fevernova. 1994:The Questra The technical development for the Questra took place in the adidas centre for ball development in France, followed by test games in France,Germany and the USA with professional players, amateurs and youth teams. The design embodied adidas's theme for the Woild Cup: innovation and "the quest for the stars". The ball was manufactured from five different materials with a flexible but durable outer layer made from polyurethane. 1998: The Tricolore The official match ball of the FIFA World Cup™ France 1998 featured a newly engineered hi-tech foam layer. This new foam material, called syntactic foam, had even better compression and more explosive rebound characteristics, making the ball softer and faster than its predecessor, Questra.The first World Cup ball in colour was a revolutionary concept in ball surface design. Appropriately, the colours of revolutionary France which gave the ball its name. Soccer is the most popular sport in the world...

COVER_Majalah DIKBUD Edisi 02.cdr - kementerian pendidikan ...

Ujian Nasional Tiket Masuk Perguruan Tinggi PUSAT INFORMASI DAN HUBUNGAN MASYARAKAT...UN adalah contoh lain lagi. Hal baru yang ... peserta didik mendaftar SNMPTN secara komputerisasi, dan menjalani .... Naskah soal UN 2013 dengan lembar....Bidikmisi adalah program bantuan biaya pendidikan yang diberikan Pemerintah kepada mahasiswa yang memiliki potensi akademik memadai dan kurang mampu secara ekonomi. Misi program ini untuk menghidupkan harapan bagi masyarakat kurang mampu dan mempotensi akademik memadai untuk dapat menempuh pendidikan sampai ke jenjang pendidikan tinggi....

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