SEARCH

Found 742 related files. Current in page 1

contoh judul skripsi ekonomi regional

Case Study Political Geography and Al Qaeda Terrorism - Cengage ...

Why do the Islamic fundamentalists in general—and followers of al Qaeda in particular—resort to terrorist tactics against Americans and other Westerners around the globe? This question has haunted Americans since 9/11 and prompted a host of antiterrorist policies throughout the world. Much has been written and spoken on the subject, and more will be written and spoken in the years ahead. Political geography offers a frame of reference to learn about al Qaeda and other militant Islamic groups and their anti-West, anti–U.S. posture. To explore the point of view propounded by Osama bin Laden and others, this case study uses the five levels of analysis introduced in chapter three, examined here from a geopolitical perspective. The five levels of analysis are the: 1) international system, 2) regional, 3) state, 4) substate (tribal groups), and 5) individual. INTERNATIONAL SYSTEM LEVEL From the international system perspective, consider the following historical context of al Qaeda’s militant Islam. Militant Islamic fundamentalists and followers of Islam are heirs to one of the great civilizations of the world. While...

Breaking the Bonds between Al-Qa'ida and Its Affiliate Organizations

A l-Qa’ida seems to be on its heels. The death of Osama bin Laden and the fall of Arab dictators have left its leadership in disarray, its narrative confused, and the organization on the defensive. One silver lining for al-Qaida, however, has been its affiliate organizations. In Iraq, the Maghreb, Somalia, Yemen, and elsewhere, alQa’ida has used local groups to expand its reach, increase its power, and grow its numbers. This string of mergers is not over. In places as diverse as the Sinai Peninsula and Nigeria, al-Qa’ida-linked organizations are emerging. However, the jihadist world is more fractured than it may appear at first glance. Many Salafi-jihadist groups have not joined with al-Qa’ida, and even if they have, tensions and divisions occur that present the United States and its allies with opportunities for weakening the bond. at the same time, several Salafi-jihadist groups chose not to affiliate with al-Qa’ida, including Egypt’s Gamaat al-Islamiyya and Libyan Islamic Fighting Group (LIFG), and fighters in Chechnya, Gaza, and Pakistan maintained their distance as well. Motivations to the Affiliate for Joining There are a number of reasons why a group may choose to affiliate with al-Qa’ida, some practical, some ideological, and some personal: • • Al-Qa’ida has always been both a group with its own agenda and a facilitator of other terrorist groups. This meant that it not only carried out attacks on U.S. targets in Kenya, Tanzania, and Yemen throughout the 1990s, but it helped other jihadist groups with funding, training, and additional logistical essentials. Toward the end of the 1990s, alQa’ida incorporated Egyptian Islamic Jihad into its structure. After September 11, 2001, this process of deepening its relationship with outside groups took off, and today a number of regional groups bear the label “al-Qa’ida” in their name, along with a more local designation.

The Woo Group RBC Wealth Management Hong Kong USA: Global Investment Outlook

RBC Investment Strategy Committee The RBC Investment Strategy Committee consists of senior investment professionals drawn from individual client focused business units within RBC. The Committee regularly receives economic and capital markets related input from internal and external sources. Important guidance is provided by the Committee’s regional advisors (North America, Europe, Far East), from the Global Fixed Income & Currencies Subcommittee and from the global equity sector heads (financials and healthcare, consumer discretionary and consumer staples, industrials and utilities, energy and materials, telecommunications and technology). From this it builds a detailed global investment forecast looking one year forward.

PROCEDURES FOR FLOWBACK TRAVEL ON DELTA AIR LINES ...

sibility of the crewmember.) Flights operated by Delta Connection or other regional carriers or code share partners are excluded from this agreement. Priority will be given to Delta employees and all NRSA passengers (retirees, buddy pass holders, ID90, etc.). Thereafter, crewmembers from other airlines that have entered into similar agreements with Delta will be accorded such transportation on a “first come, first served” basis.

German Guardianship Law German Guardianship Law

As the result of an accident or illness, or because of old age, some people are no longer in a position to take care of important matters themselves. They need someone who can represent their interests and rights in dealings with doctors, for example, or public offices and officials. The basic principles of legal guardianship are explained in this advice brochure, and the duties and rights of the care-taking guardians described in some detail. You see, German guardianship law is complicated. And not all advice centres and facilities are adjusted to persons with a migration background. Migrants often don’t know which options they actually have, the main reason being that they are not familiar with German guardianship law. Then again, it’s difficult for them to understand the often rather complex legal regulations because their German language skills aren’t so good. This brochure is intended to be both a source of advice and a guide. It takes cultural differences into consideration, and tries to help you to understand the complicated system of German guardianship law. After all, as far as matters of your personal wealth and welfare are concerned, nobody can fulfil expectations better than you yourself. Which is why everyone should have the chance to check whether precautionary measures should be taken in good times – for bad times – if, indeed, guardianship is necessary at some point. As well as an illustration of the legal basics, the brochure also contains a detailed description of types of precautionary options, in the shape of advance directives on guardianship, living wills and powers of attorney. Moreover, it contains a list of the regional drop-in centres, like guardianship authorities and associations, which offer advice and support. The brochure is published in several languages so that migrants have access to all the information. Our thanks go to the Institute for Transcultural Support for developing and publishing this brochure, which bears in mind the growing need for legal support of persons with a migration background.

Town of Nolensville, Tennessee Zoning Map

Zoning Map of Nolensville, Tennessee. Certified by the Nolensville Planning Commission. Chair. Approved and adopted by the Nolensville Board of Mayor and ... This is to certify that this is the official Zoning Map of Nolensville, Tennessee Certified by the Nolensville Planning Commission Chair Approved and adopted by the Nolensville Board of Mayor and Alderman Mayor... PARCELS WATER BODIES OVERLAY: ANNEXATION BUFFER DISTRICT (ABO) OVERLAY: COMMERCIAL CORRIDOR DISTRICT (CCO) OVERLAY: HISTORIC DISTRICT (HD) OVERLAY: OPEN SPACE DEVELOPMENT (OSD) OVERLAY: PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT (PUD) BASE ZONING: ESTATE RESIDENTIAL (ER) BASE ZONING: SUBURBAN RESIDENTIAL (SR) BASE ZONING: URBAN RESIDENTIAL (UR) - NOT PRESENTLY USED BASE ZONING: VILLAGE (V) BASE ZONING: VILLAGE FRINGE (VF) - NOT PRESENTLY USED BASE ZONING: COMMERCIAL SERVICES (CS) BASE ZONING: OFFICE INDUSTRIAL (OI) BASE ZONING: PUBLIC INSTITUTIONAL (PI) BASE ZONING: COMMERCIAL REGIONAL (CR) ! ! Town of Nolensville, Tennessee Zoning Map (Revised April 12, 2012)

Geologic Map of East Tennessee with Explanatory Text

CONTENTS Page Abstract…………………………………………………...…………………………………………………1 Introduction ………………………………………………………...……………………………………… 3 Area covered by present map…………………………………………………………………...…………. 3 Compilation of the map ……………………………………………………………………………………. 3 Map units…………………………………………………………………………………………………… 6 Acknowledgments……………………………………………………………………………………….…. 8 Physical geography …...........…………………………………………………………........................…… 11 Regional setting .........................…............…………………………………………………….…. 11 Unaka Mountains .............................................……………………………………………….….. 11 Valley of East Tennessee ........................................………………………………………………. 14 Cumberland Plateau ..............................……………………………………………………….…. 16 Erosion surfaces ................................................………………………………………………….. 17 Description of rock units .............................................……………………………………………….…… 21 Pre-Cambrian crystalline complex …………………………………...............................…….….. 21 Mount Rogers volcanic group ….......................................…………………………………..…… 23 Ocoee series ....................................................………………………………………………….… 24 Name, subdivision .........................................……………………………………………. 24 Northeast of Pigeon River ……………………………………………………………..… 24 Southwest of Pigeon River, foothill belt……………………………………………….… 28 Southwest of Pigeon River, mountain belt…………………………………………..…… 31 General remarks………………………………………………………………………...… 33 Unicoi formation and Cochran conglomerate…………………………………………………...… 34 Hampton formation and Nichols shale………………………………………………………..…… 38 Erwin formation and equivalent rocks…………………………………………………………..… 39 Shady dolomite……………………………………………………………………………….….… 42 Rome formation……………………………………………………………………………….…… 43 Conasauga shale or Conasauga group…………………………………………………………...… 47 Name, contacts………………………………………………………………………….… 47 Northwestern phase: Conasauga shale………………………………………………….… 48 Central phase: Pumpkin Valley to Maynardville formations…………………………..… 49 Southeastern phase: Honaker dolomite, Nolichucky shale, and Maynardville limestone………………………………………………………………... 51 Knox dolomite or Knox group…………………………………………………………………….. 53 Name, subdivision………………………………………………………………………… 53 Northwestern phase: dominantly dolomite……………………………………………….. 55 Southeastern phase: dominantly limestone……………………………………………….. 61 Lower and middle parts of Chickamauga limestone and equivalent rocks………………………... 64...

IPCC AR4 Chapter 10 - Global Climate Projections

The future climate change results assessed in this chapter are based on a hierarchy of models, ranging from AtmosphereOcean General Circulation Models (AOGCMs) and Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity (EMICs) to Simple Climate Models (SCMs). These models are forced with concentrations of greenhouse gases and other constituents derived from various emissions scenarios ranging from nonmitigation scenarios to idealised long-term scenarios. In general, we assess non-mitigated projections of future climate change at scales from global to hundreds of kilometres. Further assessments of regional and local climate changes are provided in Chapter 11. Due to an unprecedented, joint effort by many modelling groups worldwide, climate change projections are now based on multi-model means, differences between models can be assessed quantitatively and in some instances, estimates of the probability of change of important climate system parameters complement expert judgement. New results corroborate those given in the Third Assessment Report (TAR). Continued greenhouse gas emissions at or above current rates will cause further warming and induce many changes in the global climate system during the 21st century that would very likely be larger than those observed during the 20th century. Mean Temperature All models assessed here, for all the non-mitigation scenarios considered, project increases in global mean surface air temperature (SAT) continuing over the 21st century, driven mainly by increases in anthropogenic greenhouse gas concentrations, with the warming proportional to the associated radiative forcing. There is close agreement of globally averaged SAT multi-model mean warming for the early 21st century for concentrations derived from the three non-mitigated IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES: B1, A1B and A2) scenarios (including only anthropogenic forcing) run by the AOGCMs (warming averaged for 2011 to 2030 compared to 1980 to 1999 is between +0.64°C and +0.69°C, with a range of only 0.05°C). Thus, this warming rate is affected little by different scenario assumptions or different model sensitivities, and is consistent with that observed for the past few decades (see Chapter 3).

Detection and Attribution of Climate Change: from Global to Regional

Atmospheric Temperatures More than half of the observed increase in global mean surface temperature (GMST) from 1951 to 2010 is very likely1 due to the observed anthropogenic increase in greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations. The consistency of observed and modeled changes across the climate system, including warming of the atmosphere and ocean, sea level rise, ocean acidification and changes in the water cycle, the cryosphere and climate extremes points to a large-scale warming resulting primarily from anthropogenic increases in GHG concentrations. Solar forcing is the only known natural forcing acting to warm the climate over this period but it has increased much less than GHG forcing, and the observed pattern of long-term tropospheric warming and stratospheric cooling is not consistent with the expected response to solar irradiance variations. The Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation (AMO) could be a confounding influence but studies that find a significant role for the AMO show that this does not project strongly onto 1951–2010 temperature trends. {10.3.1, Table 10.1} It is extremely likely that human activities caused more than half of the observed increase in GMST from 1951 to 2010. This assessment is supported by robust evidence from multiple studies using different methods. Observational uncertainty has been explored much more thoroughly than previously and the assessment now considers observations from the first decade of the 21st century and simulations from a new generation of climate models whose ability to simulate historical climate has improved in many respects relative to the previous generation of models considered in AR4. Uncertainties in forcings and in climate models’ temperature responses to individual forcings and difficulty in distinguishing the patterns of temperature response due to GHGs and other anthropogenic forcings prevent a more precise quantification of the temperature changes attributable to GHGs. {9.4.1, 9.5.3, 10.3.1, Figure 10.5, Table 10.1} GHGs contributed a global mean surface warming likely to be between 0.5°C and 1.3°C over the period 1951–2010, with the contributions from other anthropogenic forcings likely to be between –0.6°C and 0.1°C, from natural forcings likely to be between –0.1°C and 0.1°C, and from internal variability likely to be between –0.1°C and 0.1°C. Together these assessed contributions are consistent with the observed warming of approximately 0.6°C over this period. {10.3.1, Figure 10.5} It is virtually certain that internal variability alone cannot account for the observed global warming since 1951. The observed global-scale warming since 1951 is large compared to climate model estimates of internal variability on 60-year time scales.

SBMPTN 2013 Biologi - Bisa Kimia

Doc. Name: SBMPTN2013BIO999 Doc. Version : 2013-10 | 01. Contoh keberadaan satwa pada suatu habitat yang dijaga dengan baik sebagai upaya pelestarian ex situ adalah… (A) Orang utan di hutan Kalimantan. (B) Cendrawasih di hutan Papua. (C) Rusa di Kebun Raya Bogor. (D) Pesut diSungai Mahakam. (E) Anoa di Pulau Sulawesi 02. Komunitas mikroba yang melekat pada suatu substrat/benda sehingga dapat merusak substrat/benda tersebut disebut… (A) Biodegradator. (B) Bioaktivator. (C) Biokatalis. (D) Biodeposit. (E) Biofilm. 03. Bagian sistem pencernaan yang berperan dalam memecah polipeptida menjadi oligopeptida adalah… (A) Duodenum. (B) Usus besar. (C) Lambung. (D) Jejunum. (E) Ileum. 04. Asam absisat melindungi tanaman yang mengalami kekurangan air melalui mekanisme… (A) Peningkatan pembentukan kutikula. (B) Penurunan tekanan turgor sel penjaga. (C) Peningkatan kecepatan pembelahan sel. (D) Penurunan kecepatan pembentangan sel. (E) Penghambatan pemanjangan sel epidermis. halaman 1 05. Pernyataan yang salah mengenai fotofosforilisasi siklik dan non siklik adalah… (A) Pada fotofosforilisasi non siklik sumber elektron yang memasuki Fotosistem II adalah molekul air, pada fotofosforilisasi siklik, sumber dari elektron adalah Fotosistem I. (B) Pada fotofosforilisasi non siklik penerima elktron terakhir adalah NADP, pada fotofosforilisasi siklik, penerima elektron terakhir adalah Fotosistem I. (C) Hasil dari fotofosforilisasi non siklik adalah ATP, NADPH, dan O2, sedangkan hasil dari fotofosforilisasi siklikhanya ATP. (D) Fotofosforilisasi non siklik melibatkan Fotosistem I dan II, fotofosforilisasi siklik hanya melibatkan Fotosistem II. 06. Perhatikan diagram saluran kreb berikut! Tahap dimana berlangsung hidrasi adalah (A) 1 dan 4 (B) 1 dan 5 (C) 2 dan 6 (D) 3 dan 7 (E) 3 dan 8 Kunci dan pembahasan soal ini bisa dilihat di www.zenius.net dengan memasukkan kode 3117 ke menu search. Copyright © 2013 Zenius Education SBMPTN 2013 Biologi, Kode Soal doc. name: SBMPTN2013BIO999 halaman 2 doc. version : 2013-10 | 07. Perhatikan gambar tahapan mitosis berikut! 10. Grafik berikut menunjukan kinerja insulin sintetis. Tahap telofase, metaphase, anaphase dan profasen ditunjukan oleh urutan angka…

« previous  123456789