SEARCH

Found 5789 related files. Current in page 6

contoh introduction research paper

School Information - Cal Club
by solmon 0 Comments favorite 3 Viewed Download 0 Times

So you want to go wheel to wheel racing! SCCA is the best way to do it and Cal Club is one of SCCA’s best regions. We offer a variety of tracks and car classes. Our competition license schools are held every March at Buttonwillow Raceway Park. If you have racing experience you may be able to get a waiver for the school requirements. The License Waiver Checklist will lead you through that process. The License waiver form can be found on our web site under Road Racing, SCCA license, If you do not qualify for a waiver here is what you will need to do: The successful completion of the driver school requirements is a pre-requisite to getting an SCCA Competition license. It can be a bit confusing and we hope the explanations below will help you through the process, but always feel free to contact the office at 661-304-9382 or calclubhq@aol.com. 1. You must be a member of SCCA. Membership forms can be found on our web site under Road Racing, SCCA License 2. You must apply for a Novice Permit (Form can be found on our web site under Road Racing, SCCA license) from SCCA. You will need to have a medical exam (forms can be found on our web site under Road Racing, SCCA License) allow yourself plenty of time to apply for the Novice permit, it will take SCCA about 3 weeks to process the paperwork. Make sure that you send in the Novice Permit Application, the Medical forms (completely filled out) and payment for the Novice Permit of $110. When you send in all the paper work to SCCA in Topeka make sure to keep COPIES of everything! After sending in the required paperwork you will receive your permit and a GCR (General Competition Rules) book in the mail from the Topeka office of SCCA. Bring all that to Registration at the track the day of the school.

Gear Cutting and Grinding Machines and Precision Cutting Tools ...

It is a never-ending theme for motorcycle and automobile manufacturers, for whom the Machine Tool Division of Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) manufactures and delivers gear cutting machines, gear grinding machines and precision cutting tools, to strive for high precision, low cost transmission gears. This paper reports the recent trends in the automobile industry while describing how MHI has been dealing with their needs as a manufacturer of the machines and cutting tools for gear production. process before heat treatment. A gear shaping machine, however, processes workpieces such as stepped gears and internal gears that a gear hobbing machine is unable to process. Since they employ a generating process by a specific number of cutting edges, several tens of microns of tool marks remain on the gear flanks, which in turn causes vibration and noise. To cope with this issue, a gear shaving process improves the gear flank roughness and finishes the gear tooth profile to a precision of microns while anticipating how the heat treatment will strain the tooth profile and tooth trace. After heat treatment, it was usual only to finish the portion of the gear that accommodates a bearing.

Gear grinding - Krebs & Riedel Schleifscheibenfabrik

KREBS & RIEDEL on modern machines using the latest CNC profiling technology. The process and organisation of production guarantees that our customers’ most demanding quality requirements are met using grinding wheels with constant structural properties and the tightest tolerances on hardness. CNC-Profiling The grinding wheel compounds are based on our innovative MULTO vitrified bond system and, in conjunction with the grinding media used (high-grade aluminium oxide, micro-crystalline sintered aluminium oxide and the new aluminium oxynitride), guarantee low thermal effects on the workpiece, good retention of profile, and cutting ability with high dressing cycle speeds and high efficiency. Structure of MULTO We are certified in accordance with ISO 9001:2008 and produce the grinding tools in accordance with the internationally valid standards EN, ANSI and JIS. KREBS & RIEDEL is member of the GEAR RESEARCH CIRCLE of the Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering (WZL) at RWTH Aachen University (Germany). Worm grinding wheel at work The range held in stock includes grinding wheels in white high-grade aluminium oxide and sintered aluminium oxide. Due to their selective porosity and grain compound, the grinding wheels guarantee a cool grind with high profile and abrasion resistance. Most recently, the application of dressable vitrified CBN grinding wheels to gear grinding has also intensified. For this purpose, KREBS & RIEDEL can also offer you a product programme that we CBN-Worm grinding wheel are continuously developing further and perfecting.

The Compact High-Precision Cylindrical Grinding Machine

Platform concept Optimal arrangement of the wheelhead in relation to the workpiece The truth of the highest precision KEL-VERA – the on-going consequent development has led to the introduction of this extremely compact machine which is based on a visionary modular concept. The new design of the hydrostatic guideways is meeting even the extremest requirements on universal as well as on production grinding. Building-up on their experience of more than 15 years with hydrostatic guideways, KELLENBERGER is launching a completely new range of machines. The objective rigorously striven for had been to develop a compact machine which can be used for the grinding of any kind of components with a length of up to 400 mm. The concept is based on platforms for the table slide and wheelhead supports, and also for applications where the table slide is the direct starting basis. The new machine models are offered in their standard configuration. Application- and customer-specific versions, however, are also available. Highly dynamic and rigid guiding and driving systems The new very rigid hydrostatic guideways provide the basis for higher performance and dynamics in the X- and Z-axes. Further, the productivity and precision on unround grinding are significantly enhanced. Stronger drives fort he axes of the KELVERA are permitting rapid speeds of up to 30 m/min. on the longitudinal axis, and of 15 m/min. on the infeed axis, both movements with higher accelerations.

Geologic Map of East Tennessee with Explanatory Text

CONTENTS Page Abstract…………………………………………………...…………………………………………………1 Introduction ………………………………………………………...……………………………………… 3 Area covered by present map…………………………………………………………………...…………. 3 Compilation of the map ……………………………………………………………………………………. 3 Map units…………………………………………………………………………………………………… 6 Acknowledgments……………………………………………………………………………………….…. 8 Physical geography …...........…………………………………………………………........................…… 11 Regional setting .........................…............…………………………………………………….…. 11 Unaka Mountains .............................................……………………………………………….….. 11 Valley of East Tennessee ........................................………………………………………………. 14 Cumberland Plateau ..............................……………………………………………………….…. 16 Erosion surfaces ................................................………………………………………………….. 17 Description of rock units .............................................……………………………………………….…… 21 Pre-Cambrian crystalline complex …………………………………...............................…….….. 21 Mount Rogers volcanic group ….......................................…………………………………..…… 23 Ocoee series ....................................................………………………………………………….… 24 Name, subdivision .........................................……………………………………………. 24 Northeast of Pigeon River ……………………………………………………………..… 24 Southwest of Pigeon River, foothill belt……………………………………………….… 28 Southwest of Pigeon River, mountain belt…………………………………………..…… 31 General remarks………………………………………………………………………...… 33 Unicoi formation and Cochran conglomerate…………………………………………………...… 34 Hampton formation and Nichols shale………………………………………………………..…… 38 Erwin formation and equivalent rocks…………………………………………………………..… 39 Shady dolomite……………………………………………………………………………….….… 42 Rome formation……………………………………………………………………………….…… 43 Conasauga shale or Conasauga group…………………………………………………………...… 47 Name, contacts………………………………………………………………………….… 47 Northwestern phase: Conasauga shale………………………………………………….… 48 Central phase: Pumpkin Valley to Maynardville formations…………………………..… 49 Southeastern phase: Honaker dolomite, Nolichucky shale, and Maynardville limestone………………………………………………………………... 51 Knox dolomite or Knox group…………………………………………………………………….. 53 Name, subdivision………………………………………………………………………… 53 Northwestern phase: dominantly dolomite……………………………………………….. 55 Southeastern phase: dominantly limestone……………………………………………….. 61 Lower and middle parts of Chickamauga limestone and equivalent rocks………………………... 64...

9 Reasons Why Reputation Marketing Is Critical For Local Business

Local consumers are using multiple devices more frequently to search for, research & review local businesses. SMBs who don't capitalise on this by having a useful & professional websites, monitoring their online reputation, or communicating with consumers online, may get left behind.

Suzuki GSX-R1300 / Hayabusa - Fuelpak
by nkono 0 Comments favorite 7 Viewed Download 0 Times

GSX-R1300 / HAYABUSA READ ALL INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE BEGINNING INSTALLATION TOOLS NEEDED - #1 Phillips Screwdriver - 5 mm Allen Wrench - 10 mm Socket Wrench - Less than 1 hour 08-09 Suzuki GSX-R1300 / Hayabusa Fuel Injected Models INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS FOR P/N 62009 INTRODUCTION: Congratulations on your purchase of the Fuelpak Fuel Management System for fuel injected Suzuki GSX-R1300 and Hayabusa motorcycles. Please take the time to read the entire instruction manual before attempting to install. DO NOT adjust the Fuelpak until you have thoroughly read the instruction manual and the unit is fully installed. If you have questions, please call (562) 921-0071. SUMMARY: To achieve the optimum performance from your application, it is recommended that you install a high performance air filter in conjunction with this unit. The Fuelpak will be installed in-line the factory injector wiring harness and the throttle position sensor. The Fuelpak will be tucked under the seat next to the ECU with the cables routing to the left side of the motorcycle. PLEASE NOTE: Fuelpak USE REQUIRES A HIGH PERFORMANCE AIR FILTER. 1. Remove the main seat and passenger seat. 2. Use a prop to hold the tank up in the trunk area.

What's In a Name? Global Warming Versus Climate Change

This report is based on findings from a bi-annual series of nationally representative survey studies – Climate Change in the American Mind – conducted by the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication (http://environment.yale.edu/climate-communication) and the George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication (http://www.climatechangecommunication.org). The research was funded by the Energy Foundation, the 11th Hour Project, the Grantham Foundation, and the V.K. Rasmussen Foundation. Principal Investigators: Anthony Leiserowitz, PhD Yale Project on Climate Change Communication School of Forestry & Environmental Studies Yale University anthony.leiserowitz@yale.edu Geoff Feinberg Yale Project on Climate Change Communication School of Forestry & Environmental Studies Yale University geoffrey.feinberg@yale.edu Seth Rosenthal, PhD Yale Project on Climate Change Communication School of Forestry & Environmental Studies Yale University seth.rosenthal@yale.edu Nicholas Smith, PhD Division of Psychology and Language Sciences University College London nicholas.smith@ucl.ac.uk Ashley Anderson, PhD Department of Journalism & Technical Communication Colorado State University ashley.a.anderson@colostate.edu Connie Roser-Renouf, PhD Center for Climate Change Communication Department of Communication George Mason University croserre@gmu.edu

Climate Change Home - World Bank
by mericca 0 Comments favorite 5 Viewed Download 0 Times

Development and Climate Change: A Strategic Framework for the World Bank Group Contents Executive summary .......................................................................................................................... i 1. INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................................1 2. Implementation Progress: Supporting Country-led Climate Actions......................................... 5 3. Implementation Progress: Mobilizing Finance and Markets ................................................... 18 4. Implementation Progress: Fostering Innovation, Knowledge, and Capacity ........................... 32 5. Implementation Progress: Global Impact through Strategic Partnerships ................................ 39 6. Institutional Arrangements and Results .................................................................................... 43 7. Emerging Lessons and Directions.............................................................................................. 46 Annexes Annex 1. Implementation Progress for Key Actions and Deliverables .........................................54 Annex 2. IFC Climate-Positive Investments and Innovation ........................................................62 Annex 3. Addressing Climate Change–Related Programs in the World Bank Regions ..............65 Annex 4. Climate Investment Funds .............................................................................................78 Annex 5. Main Climate Finance Instruments the WBG can use ...................................................80 Boxes Box 1. Several COP-15 Outcomes Are Important for the WBG’s Development Mandate .......................... 3 Box 3. Climate Issues in Country Assistance/Partnership Strategies ........................................................... 6 Box 4. Scaling Up Adaptation Efforts Across Sectors and Regions—Highlights from FY09 ..................... 8 Box 5. Disaster Response Management and the Climate Change Adaptation Nexus .................................. 9 Box 6. Programmatic Approaches to Addressing Climate Change in Agriculture and Rural Development .................................................................................................................................................................... 10 Box 7. Promoting Urban Energy-Efficient Programs and Sustainable Energy Planning ........................... 11 Box 9. Scaling Up Renewable Energy Markets .......................................................................................... 13 Box 10. World Bank Group Experience Financing Energy Efficiency ...................................................... 14 Box 11. Energy Access for Sustainable Development................................................................................ 15 Box 12. Flared Gas Reduction for Energy Access in Africa ...................................................................... 16 Box 13. Multistakeholder Partnership for the Urban Transport Transformation Project (UTTP) in Mexico .................................................................................................................................................................... 17 Box 14. CTF: Thirteen Investment Plans Endorsed with an Overall Funding Envelope of $4.4 billion Leveraging additional $36 billion ............................................................................................................... 19 Box 15. Piloting Climate Resilience ........................................................................................................... 21 Box 16. IDA as a Platform for Climate-Smart Development ..................................................................... 23 Box 17. Carbon Finance: Building on Experience and Looking Forward .................................................. 24 Box 19. Innovation in Catastrophe Weather-Risk Financing ..................................................................... 26

Coping with Global climate change - C2es

Prepared for the Pew Center on Global Climate Change by ... Throughout the next century and beyond, global climate change will have significant effects on. William E. Easterling III P E N N S Y LVA N I A S TAT E U N I V E R S I T Y Brian H. Hurd N E W M E X I C O S TAT E U N I V E R S I T Y Joel B. Smith S T R AT U S C O N S U LT I N G I N C . + Coping with Global climate change T h e Ro l e o f A d a p t a t i o n i n t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s P r e p a r e d f o r t h e Pe w C e n t e r o n G l o b a l C l i m a t e C h a n g e by William E. Easterling III P E N N S Y LVA N I A S TAT E U N I V E R S I T Y Brian H. Hurd N E W M E X I C O S TAT E U N I V E R S I T Y Joel B. Smith S T R AT U S C O N S U LT I N G I N C . June 2004 Contents Foreword ii Executive Summary I. Introduction iii 1 A. Climate Change, Impacts, and Adaptation 1 3 Changes in Human Adaptive Capacity 6 B. Adaptation Concepts and Definitions C. II. What History Tells Us About Adaptation to Climate Variability A. Crop Translocation: Winter Wheat in the United States 8 8 B. Resource Substitution in Response to Scarcity: 10 Sea-Level Rise Analogue: The Rising Great Salt Lake 11 Case Study Lessons 12 Dryland for Irrigated Agriculture in the Great Plains C. D. 14 Reactive Adaptation as Assessed in Quantitative Studies 14 Effectiveness of Reactive Adaptation—General Findings 16 III. Reactive Adaptation: How Successful Will It Be? A. B. IV. The Case for Proactive Adaptation A. Knowledge and Learning + 24 25 25 26 B. Risk and Disaster Management and Response C. Infrastructure Planning and Development D. Institutional Design and Reform 26 E. Increased Flexibility of Sensitive Managed and Unmanaged Systems F. Avoidance of “Maladaptations” 29 30 + 30 The Role of Public Policy 31 G. Technological Innovation H. 32 35 V. Conclusions References i Coping with Global climate change

 2345678910