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CHRONIC FUNCTIONAL ABDOMINAL PAIN Reprinted with ...

Reprinted with permission from the IFFGD. Originally printed in Participate -- Vol 7 No 1, Spring 1998. Go to the IFFGD website for Information on subscribing to Participate (and becoming an IFFGD member). People with functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders can have a variety of symptoms that range from painless diarrhea or constipation, to pain associated with diarrhea and/or constipation (usually called irritable bowel syndrome). There is another, less common condition of abdominal pain that is chronic or frequently recurring; it is not associated with changes in bowel pattern. This condition is called chronic functional abdominal pain (CFAP). CFAP is a functional GI disorder. There are no abnormal x-rays or laboratory findings to explain the pain. It occurs because of altered sensitivity to nerve impulses in the gut and brain, and it is not associated with altered motility in the intestines. For people with CFAP, the pain can be so all-consuming that it becomes the main focus of their lives. Not only does it impact on quality of life, but it has a major economic impact as well. The US Householders Survey of Functional GI Disorders published in 1993 found that people with CFAP missed an average of 12 days of work annually due to illness compared to 4 missed days for people without gastrointestinal symptoms. Also, the number of doctor visits in a year averaged 11 for those with CFAP compared with only 2 for those without CFAP.

a the future of al-qaeda - The Investigative Project on Terrorism

Pensez à recycler Think recycling Publication no 2013-05-01 de la série Regards sur le monde : avis d’experts This report contains the results of a research project led by the academic outreach program of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) to explore the future of the Al-Qaeda phenomenon. It consists of alternative future scenarios developed during a workshop, as well as four original papers written by individual specialists at the request of CSIS. The report is not an analytical document and does not represent any formal assessment or position of CSIS or the Government of Canada. All components of the project were held under Chatham House rule; therefore, the identity of the authors and the participants is not disclosed. www.csis-scrs.gc.ca Published April 2013 Printed in Canada © Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada Photo credit: istockphoto.com World Watch: Expert Notes series publication No. 2013-05-01 Le présent rapport contient les conclusions d’un projet d’étude mené dans le cadre du programme de liaison recherche du Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité (SCRS) pour examiner l’avenir du phénomène al-Qaïda. Il présente des scénarios envisagés lors d’un atelier, ainsi que quatre études originales rédigées par différents spécialistes à la demande du SCRS. Le présent rapport n’est pas un document analytique et ne représente pas la position officielle du SCRS ou du gouvernement du Canada. Tout le projet s’est déroulé conformément à la règle de Chatham House; les auteurs ne sont donc pas cités et les noms des participants ne sont pas révélés. www.scrs-csis.gc.ca Publié en avril 2013 Imprimé au Canada © Sa Majesté la Reine du chef du Canada Crédit photo : istockphoto.com Ce document est imprimé avec de l’encre sans danger pour l’environement

Just Cause 2 - Microsoft Xbox 360 - Manual ... - Games Database

A very small percentage of people may experience a seizure when exposed to certain visual images, including flashing lights or patterns that may appear in video games. Even people who have no history of seizures or epilepsy may have an undiagnosed condition that can cause these “photosensitive epileptic seizures” while watching video games. These seizures may have a variety of symptoms, including lightheadedness, altered vision, eye or face twitching, jerking or shaking of arms or legs, disorientation, confusion, or momentary loss of awareness. Seizures may also cause loss of consciousness or convulsions that can lead to injury from falling down or striking nearby objects. Immediately stop playing and consult a doctor if you experience any of these symptoms. Parents should watch for or ask their children about the above symptoms— children and teenagers are more likely than adults to experience these seizures. The risk of photosensitive epileptic seizures may be reduced by taking the following precautions: Sit farther from the screen; use a smaller screen; play in a well-lit room; do not play when you are drowsy or fatigued. If you or any of your relatives have a history of seizures or epilepsy, consult a doctor before playing.

MX vs ATV Reflex - Microsoft Xbox 360 - Manual - gamesdbase.com

WARNING Before playing this game, read the Xbox 360® console and accessory manuals for important safety and health information. Keep all manuals for future reference. For replacement console and accessory manuals, go to www.xbox.com/support. Important Health Warning About Playing Video Games Photosensitive seizures A very small percentage of people may experience a seizure when exposed to certain visual images, including flashing lights or patterns that may appear in video games. Even people who have no history of seizures or epilepsy may have an undiagnosed condition that can cause these “photosensitive epileptic seizures” while watching video games. These seizures may have a variety of symptoms, including lightheadedness, altered vision, eye or face twitching, jerking or shaking of arms or legs, disorientation, confusion, or momentary loss of awareness. Seizures may also cause loss of consciousness or convulsions that can lead to injury from falling down or striking nearby objects. Immediately stop playing and consult a doctor if you experience any of these symptoms. Parents should watch for or ask their children about the above symptoms— children and teenagers are more likely than adults to experience these seizures. The risk of photosensitive epileptic seizures may be reduced by taking the following precautions: Sit farther from the screen; use a smaller screen; play in a well-lit room; do not play when you are drowsy or fatigued. If you or any of your relatives have a history of seizures or epilepsy, consult a doctor before playing.

Warning - Activision Support
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A very small percentage of people may experience a seizure when exposed to certain visual images, including flashing lights or patterns that may appear in video games. Even people who have no history of seizures or epilepsy may have an undiagnosed condition that can cause these “photosensitive epileptic seizures” while watching video games. These seizures may have a variety of symptoms, including lightheadedness, altered vision, eye or face twitching, jerking or shaking of arms or legs, disorientation, confusion, or momentary loss of awareness. Seizures may also cause loss of consciousness or convulsions that can lead to injury from falling down or striking nearby objects. Immediately stop playing and consult a doctor if you experience any of these symptoms. Parents should watch for or ask their children about the above symptoms – children and teenagers are more likely than adults to experience these seizures. The risk of photosensitive epileptic seizures may be reduced by taking the following precautions: Sit farther from the screen; use a smaller screen; play in a well-lit room; do not play when you are drowsy or fatigued. If you or any of your relatives have a history of seizures or epilepsy, consult a doctor before playing.

Purchase Comfy and Doctor Recommended Cushions from Online Store

In USA, wide ranges of online stores, retails, malls and other shopping centers are offering huge collection of pillows to the users.

Dr Jaya Bhat - Best Gynecologist doctor in Bangalore

Dr Jaya Bhat is one among the top gynecologist doctors in Bangalore. She’s currently practicing at Nova specialty centre, Bangalore. Visit http://www.gynecologistinbangalore.com/dr-jaya-bhat/ to know more about the treatments and to book appointment.

Early Enrollment Program Administration - Rhode Island College

The Rhode Island College Early Enrollment Program is a concurrent enrollment program that offers college credit at Rhode Island College to high school students for certain courses which they take at their respective high schools. The EEP provides the means for high school students to get a head start in college by obtaining college credits at Rhode Island College and transferring those credits to the institution that they attend. The EEP is also a formal program that fosters communication between high school teachers and college professors and creates an educational relationship between the high school and the college communities. For a detailed explanation of the Rhode Island College Early Enrollment Program, transferring of credits, and/or other important information, please call the EEP office at 456-8857 or email us at eep@ric.edu. NACEP, the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships, of which Rhode Island College is a charter member, provides guidelines and standards to which concurrent enrollment programs must adhere to maintain membership. It is the adherence to these standards that maintains credibility and excellence among programs such as the EEP and will assure its students credit transfer among many colleges and universities in the United States. The primary purpose of this manual is to document formally the policies and guidelines which govern the workings of the Early Enrollment Program at Rhode Island College to provide a clear understanding for all parties involved.

My IDentity Doctor Soon to Launch a New Website and to Offer Engraved Medical Bracelets in Other International Languages

My IDentity Doctor, a renowned provider of medical alert jewelry is all set to launch a new website with new more innovative designs while it also forays into diversifying its product range by offering Engraved Medical Bracelets in other International languages including Arabic, Russian, Chinese, French, Spanish and more.

Stem Cell Injections - Emory Healthcare

Emory Healthcare patients can benefit from surgical implantation or injections of their own stem cells to treat chronic orthopaedic conditions. This treatment can reduce pain and provide long lasting relief from chronic tendinitis, early arthritis and cartilage damage in the joint. It uses your own body’s repair mechanisms and natural growth factors to promote healing. Why do I have chronic pain in my joints and tendons? As we age, our bodies undergo wear and tear from previous injuries, exercising and playing sports. We do not repair these injuries as well as we do when we are young. We produce less of our ‘repair’ cells (called mesenchymal stem cells) as we get older so it takes longer to recover. In some cases, the joint damage is so significant that the body cannot repair itself at all. Where do Stem Cells reside in the body? The two places in the body with an abundance of Stem Cells are your bone marrow and your adipose tissue (fat cells). These are the two places your doctor may choose to take cells from to help treat your chronic tendon or joint pain. How can Orthopaedic Stem Cell treatment help me? Stem Cells harness the healing power of your own blood and work to actually repair your damaged tissue. We isoloate stem cells from a small sample of your bone marrow or fat cells and inject or implant them directly into the damaged area. Stem cells can differentiate into specific types of cells depending on the environment they are placed, providing possible regeneration of cartilage, bone, and tendon.

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