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Oracle Application Integration Architecture: Business Process ...

Table of Contents Oracle Business Process Modeling and Analysis Overview........................ 4 Our Understanding of Business Process Management ........................... 4 What is the Challenge? ................................................................................. 4 What is the Answer? ..................................................................................... 4 What is a Business Process? ........................................................................ 5 Modeling Approach and Methodology .......................................................... 6 Oracle’s Approach to Business Process Modeling and Analysis (BPA) 6 Methodology and Organization .................................................................. 6 Model Types .................................................................................................. 7 Modeling Standards and Notation .................................................................. 8 Level 0 ............................................................................................................ 8 Level 1 ............................................................................................................ 9 Level 2 ............................................................................................................ 9 Level 3 .......................................................................................................... 10 Level 4 .......................................................................................................... 12 Functional and Composite Business Process Views ............................. 12 Modeling Tool and Viewer ............................................................................ 14 Integration with Business Services Repository ........................................... 17 Integration Scenario ................................................................................... 17 Enterprise Business Object ....................................................................... 17 Enterprise Business Service....................................................................... 18 Authoritative and Guiding Sources for Industry Process Best Practices 19 Overview of Delivered Models ..................................................................... 20 Communications Industry ......................................................................... 20 Insurance Industry ...................................................................................... 20 Utilities Industry.......................................................................................... 20 Financial Services Industry ........................................................................ 20 Retail Industry ............................................................................................. 20 Cross-Industry ............................................................................................. 20 Cross-Industry Composite Business Processes ...................................... 21 Industry-Specific Composite Business Processes .................................. 22 Inventory of Delivered Models ................................................................ 22 How Can Oracle Help? .................................................................................. 23 Oracle Business Process Analysis Suite ................................................... 23 Delivered Business Process Models ......................................................... 23 Conclusion ........................................................................................................ 24

Sterling Integrator Business Process Modeling

Contents About Sterling Integrator Business Processes Welcome to Business Process Modeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . About Business Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Business Process Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Benefits of Business Process Modeling Flexibility. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Support for Business Process Modeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Graphical Process Modeler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Standards, Foreign Language and Data Type Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Available Service and Adapter Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Support for High Volumes of Transactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Visibility Into Process Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . What Kinds of Things Can Business Processes Do? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Automation and Integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Business Process Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Subprocesses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reusability of Business Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Predefined Business Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Business Process Instance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Service Configurations in Business Process Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Business Process Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Business Process Model Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Business Process Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Flow Complexity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Business Process Management Activities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Planning Your Business Process Models Introduction to Planning Process Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . How to Approach Business Process Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Business Process Model Planning Stages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Identifying Business Needs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Identifying Activities in a Business Process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Identifying Subprocesses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Subprocess Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . © Copyright IBM Corp. 2012

A generic structure for business process modeling

Business process reengineering (BPR) is a popular term since the 1990s, especially after Hammer, Champy, and Davenport published books to elaborate BPR related issues and cases (Hammer and Champy, 1993; Davenport, 1993). Several companies and organizations report their successful experiences by applying revolutionary approaches to obtain dramatic, radical, and fundamental changes as Hammer and Champy (1993) suggested. However, people rethought the myths of BPR after recognizing that 70 percent of BPR’s efforts failed (Davenport and Stoddard, 1994). One of these myths is that business process redesign does not come from a clean slate to build new processes from scratch. Generalized from various BPR methodologies as shown in Table I, we identify one common task of these methodologies: to model the existing and new business process (Davenport, 1993; Kettinger et al., 1995). Notably, business processes modeling (BPM) is essential within a BPR life cycle. The BPM within BPR mainly plays two important roles: (1) to capture existing processes by structurally representing their activities and related elements; and...

Lesson 4: Additional Features
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Copyright DASSAULT SYSTEMES Case Study: Additional Features Design Intent Stages in the Process Advanced Sketcher Tools Multi-profile Pads and Sketches Reference Elements Revolved Features Shelling Thin Features Duration: Approximately 0.5 day Copyright DASSAULT SYSTEMES Lesson Content 4-1 CATIA V5 Fundamentals - Lesson 4: Additional Features Student Notes: Case Study: Additional Features Copyright DASSAULT SYSTEMES The case study for this lesson is the Handle Block used in the Drill Press assembly shown below. The Handle Block is part of the Handle Mechanism sub-assembly. This case study focuses on creating features that incorporate the design intent of the part. The Handle Block will consist of shafts, grooves, multi-profiles, fillets, chamfers, and a shell feature. Copyright DASSAULT SYSTEMES Case Study: Additional Features 4-2 CATIA V5 Fundamentals - Lesson 4: Additional Features Student Notes: Design Intent (1/2) The Handle Block must meet the following design intent requirements: The top portion and bottom portions of the model must be created as separate features. • The top portion of the model will be created as a shaft, the bottom section will be created as a multi-pad. XY plane The holes must created at an angle to the XY plane. Copyright DASSAULT SYSTEMES • Create the holes on the shaft surface and aligned to a user-defined plane. The plane is created at an angle to the XY plane. Creating the holes on a user-defined plane allows the angle to be changed as required. This gives more flexibility in the hole placement. Copyright DASSAULT SYSTEMES Case Study: Additional Features

Tutorial 8A
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Not For Commercial Use Surface-modeling Design with a Master Model Design in Context A- 1 Version 1a- Oct 2010 Non-Commercial Use Written by Dickson Sham CATIA V5R19 - surface modeling – Rebuild Audi R8 Design Intent Hard fillet Hard fillet PictureSource: www.audi.com/r8 Fillet disappears Fillet disappears soft fillet Hard fillet Grab photos from internet (in different views) A- 2 Version 1a- Oct 2010 Non-Commercial Use Written by Dickson Sham CATIA V5R19 - surface modeling – Rebuild Audi R8 Not For Commercial Use Wheelbase = 2650 Length = 4431 Width, Max w/o mirrors = 1904 Height = 1249 Tread Width, Front = 1632 Tread Width, Rear = 1595 Front Wheel Size (in) = 19 x 8.5 Rear Wheel Size (in) = 19x 11.0 Front Tire Size = P235/ 35R19 Rear Tire Size = P305 / 30R19 A- 3 Version 1a- Oct 2010 Non-Commercial Use Written by Dickson Sham CATIA V5R19 - surface modeling – Rebuild Audi R8 Surface-modeling Design with a Master model Tutorial 8A – – Insert 2d pictures and reposition them on offset planes Create 3D control curves Not For Commercial Use Tutorial 8B,C, D – – – – Create the front body of the master model Create the middle body of the master model Create the rear body of the master model Create parting surfaces Tutorial 8E – – Split the finished (master) model into separate parts Build more details on each part Tutorial 8F – Reassemble them together Please be reminded that this series of tutorials is designed to demonstrate a design approach with CATIA, rather than the command itself. A- 4 Version 1a- Oct 2010 Non-Commercial Use Written by Dickson Sham

CATIA V5 Design with Analysis
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CATIA V5 Design with Analysis (Tutorial 3 – Deep Fry Basket) Infrastructure Sketcher Part Design (Solid-modeling) GSD (Surface-modeling) Assembly Design Generative Structural Analysis Product Engineering Optimizer A- 1 Version 1b- Jan07 By Dickson Sham (ME Dept, HKPU) CATIA V5R16 Design with Analysis – Deep Fry Basket Overview of Tasks Tutorial 3A - Modeling • Build a Master Model of the basket handle • Create the upper & the lower parts from the Master Model • Build the mechanical features on the both parts • Get the both parts auto-updated after modifying the outlook of the master model Tutorial 3B - Modeling • Build the metal arm • Build the basket • Add material texture onto all components • Assemble components Master Model Parts Linked Children Assembly Tutorial 3C – Structural analysis • Simplify the model for analysis • Create Meshes onto two components and create a connector between them • Create boundary conditions & define properties • Analyze displacements & stresses Tutorial 3D – Structural analysis (By Nastran) • Repeat Tutorial 3C with the use of Nastran Tutorial 3E – Design optimization • Create a user parameter “volume” • Run optimization to get the minimum volume of the metal arm with the smallest part deformation Structural analysis A- 2 Version 1b- Jan07 By Dickson Sham (ME Dept, HKPU) CATIA V5R16 Design with Analysis – Deep Fry Basket General Change the view with the mouse A. Panning enables you to move the model on a plane parallel to the screen. Click and hold the middle mouse button, then drag the mouse. B. Right button Rotating enables you to rotate the model around a point. Click and hold the middle mouse button and the right button, then drag the mouse. C. Middle button Zooming enables you to increase or decrease the size of the model. Click and hold the middle button, then click ONCE and release the right button, then drag the mouse up or down.

CATIA V5 Surface-modeling
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CATIA V5 Surface-modeling (Tutorial 2-Mouse) GSD (Surface-modeling) Part Design (Solid-modeling) Assembly Design A- 1 Version 1b- Sep06 By Dickson Sham (ME dept, HKPU) CATIA V5R16 surface modeling – Mouse CATIA Surface-modeling Tutorial 2A – – – Import 2D outline drawing into Catia Build 3D curves based on the imported drawing Build the upper surfaces of the mouse (by Generative Shape Design) Tutorial 2B – – – – Do the draft analysis to search any undercut portion on the upper surfaces Adjust the curvature of the problem surface manually Build the lower surfaces of the mouse Convert the surfaces into a solid Tutorial 2C – – – – Build the parting surfaces based on the imported drawing Create components from the finished model Re-assemble the components into a product Modify the outlook of the master model and then get all components updated automatically Please be reminded that this series of tutorials is designed to demonstrate a design approach with CATIA, rather than the command itself. A- 2 Version 1b- Sep06 By Dickson Sham (ME dept, HKPU) CATIA V5R16 surface modeling – Mouse Tutorial 2A • • • • • • Download the 2d outline drawing (mouse_outline.dxf) from the web: http://myweb.polyu.edu.hk/~mmdsham/training%20materi al.htm Create a new project folder and store the downloaded file into the folder Enter CATIA by double-clicking its icon on the desktop. (If the license menu pops up, select ED2 and close CATIA. Then reopen again). By default, an empty “Product” file is created. But now, you don’t need this, just select “File/Close” on the menu bar. Select “File/Open” on the menu bar and select the downloaded drawing (mouse_outline.dxf) A- 3 Version 1b- Sep06 By Dickson Sham (ME dept, HKPU) CATIA V5R16 surface modeling – Mouse Tutorial 2A To confirm that the size of the drawing is correct:• • • Click “Dimensions” icon; Click on the scale line of the drawing; Check if the displayed dimension is 50mm; If not, we need to enlarge or shrink the drawing into the correct size. To copy and paste the drawing into 3D space:• • Multi-select all entities on the drawing, except the scale bar; Click “Copy” icon A- 4 Version 1b- Sep06 By Dickson Sham (ME dept, HKPU) CATIA V5R16 surface modeling – Mouse

DMU Kinematics Simulator - catia
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DMU Kinematics Simulator is an independent CAD product dedicated to simulating assembly motions. It addresses the design review environment of digital mock-ups (DMU) and can handle a wide range of products from consumer goods to very large automotive or aerospace projects as well as plants, ships and heavy machinery. DMU Kinematics Simulator is a dedicated DMU Navigator workbench and is available on both UNIX and Windows NT environments. This guide is organized as follows: Getting Started Provides a scenario allowing you to get acquainted with the product. Basic Tasks Provides a step-by-step guide for using DMU Kinematics Simulator. Useful tips are given for getting the most out of the product. Advanced Tasks Provides a step-by-step guide for using DMU Kinematics Simulator along with complementary DMU Navigator products. Workbench Description Describes menu commands and workbench toolbars that are useful for DMU Kinematics Simulator. Glossary Provides definitions of terms that are specific to DMU Kinematics Simulator. DMU Kinematics Simulator Version 5 makes use of CATIA Version 4 multi-model sessions that have been prepared with one or more kinematic mechanisms. This preparation task is described in the Basic User Tasks section of this guide.

Table of Contents
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All rights reserved. Reproduction by any means, electronic or mechanical including photocopying, recording or by any information storage and retrieval system or translation in whole or part is not permitted without written authorization from Ford Motor Company. Ford may change the contents without notice and without incurring obligation. Copyright © 2002 Ford Motor Company... CALIFORNIA Proposition 65 Warning WARNING: Engine exhaust, some of its constituents, and certain vehicle components contain or emit chemicals known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm. In addition, certain fluids contained in vehicles and certain products of component wear contain or emit chemicals known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm. CONGRATULATIONS Congratulations on acquiring your new Ford. Please take the time to get well acquainted with your vehicle by reading this handbook. The more you know and understand about your vehicle the greater the safety and pleasure you will derive from driving it. For more information on Ford Motor Company and its products visit the following website: • In the United States: www.ford.com • In Canada: www.ford.ca • In Australia: www.ford.com.au • In Mexico: www.ford.com.mx Additional owner information is given in separate publications. This Owner’s Guide describes every option and model variant available and therefore some of the items covered may not apply to your particular vehicle. Furthermore, due to printing cycles it may describe options before they are generally available. Remember to pass on the Owner’s Guide when reselling the vehicle. It is an integral part of the vehicle. Fuel pump shut-off switch In the event of an accident the safety switch will automatically cut off the fuel supply to the engine. The switch can also be activated through sudden vibration (e.g....

Android 4.1 Compatibility Definition Document (CDD)

Table of Contents 1. Introduction 2. Resources 3. Software 3.1. Managed API Compatibility 3.2. Soft API Compatibility 3.2.1. Permissions 3.2.2. Build Parameters 3.2.3. Intent Compatibility 3.2.3.1. Core Application Intents 3.2.3.2. Intent Overrides 3.2.3.3. Intent Namespaces 3.2.3.4. Broadcast Intents 3.3. Native API Compatibility 3.3.1 Application Binary Interfaces 3.4. Web Compatibility 3.4.1. WebView Compatibility 3.4.2. Browser Compatibility 3.5. API Behavioral Compatibility 3.6. API Namespaces 3.7. Virtual Machine Compatibility 3.8. User Interface Compatibility 3.8.1. Widgets 3.8.2. Notifications 3.8.3. Search 3.8.4. Toasts 3.8.5. Themes 3.8.6. Live Wallpapers 3.8.7. Recent Application Display 3.8.8. Input Management Settings 3.8.9. Lock Screen Remote Control 3.9 Device Administration 3.10 Accessibility 3.11 Text-to-Speech 4. Application Packaging Compatibility 5. Multimedia Compatibility 5.1. Media Codecs 5.2. Video Encoding 5.3. Audio Recording 5.4. Audio Latency 5.5. Network Protocols 6. Developer Tool Compatibility 7. Hardware Compatibility 7.1. Display and Graphics 7.1.1. Screen Configuration 7.1.2. Display Metrics 7.1.3. Screen Orientation 7.1.4. 2D and 3D Graphics Accleration 7.1.5. Legacy Application Compatibility Mode 7.1.6. Screen Types 7.1.7. Screen Technology 7.2. Input Devices 7.2.1. Keyboard 7.2.2. Non-touch Navigation 7.2.3. Navigation keys 7.2.4. Touchscreen input 7.2.5. Fake touch input 7.2.6. Microphone 7.3. Sensors 7.3.1. Accelerometer 7.3.1. Accelerometer 7.3.2. Magnetometer 7.3.3. GPS 7.3.4. Gyroscope 7.3.5. Barometer 7.3.6. Thermometer 7.3.7. Photometer 7.3.8. Proximity Sensor 7.4. Data Connectivity 7.4.1. Telephony 7.4.2. IEEE 802.11 (WiFi) 7.4.2.1. WiFi Direct 7.4.3. Bluetooth 7.4.4. Near-Field Communications 7.4.5. Minimum Network Capability 7.5. Cameras 7.5.1. Rear-Facing Camera 7.5.2. Front-Facing Camera 7.5.3. Camera API Behavior 7.5.4. Camera Orientation 7.6. Memory and Storage 7.6.1. Minimum Memory and Storage 7.6.2. Application Shared Storage 7.7. USB 8. Performance Compatibility 9. Security Model Compatibility 9.1. Permissions 9.2. UID and Process Isolation 9.3. Filesystem Permissions 9.4. Alternate Execution Environments 10. Software Compatibility Testing 10.1. Compatibility Test Suite 10.2. CTS Verifier 10.3. Reference Applications 11. Updatable Software 12. Contact Us Appendix A - Bluetooth Test Procedure

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