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Universal Grinding Machine - Thin Section

Universal Grinding Machine for Rubbing and Thin Sections Housing: Made of stainless steel, stain-resistant and powder-coated. The mechanic parts are made from anodized aircraft aluminum. Drive: Particularly solid and high-class, extremely softly running brushless DC motor 100 VA, 24V with high torque. The rotational speed goes from 0 up to 300 rpm; infinitely variable speed regulation, smooth start with clockwise and anti-clockwise rotation. Automatic coolant system: Reversible from water off, water permanently on, water on only when grinding. Water collection pan: Made of stainless steel, height-adjustable with water discharge hose. The machine can be modified with grinding discs SystemAbele® or by means of optional magnetic discs within a few seconds for all polishing and grinding discs which are available on the market, having a diameter of 250 mm. Width: ca. 37cm Length: ca. 38cm Height: ca.27cm Weight: ca. 15kg Connections: Power supply 230V/24V, foot-operated connection, feed hose 3/4", drain hose 14mm A convenient foot switch is optional. When purifying 6 nozzles rinse sufficient water onto the grinding disc. The rubber lips remove the water 3 times with any rotation and the dirt is pushed to the sides. This process reduces wear of the grinding disc and prevents grooves in thin section. Rubbing Barely simple exchange of the self-centering discs within seconds Making thin sections Barely simple convertible to optional discs within seconds for using any magnetic discs of diameter 25 cm .

ARA Fraud & Forensic Services: Computer Forensics

ARA Fraud & Forensic Services and its strategic partner, Ispirian Computer Forensics, have joined forces to offer a full array of fraud investigatory services including digital forensics.

Suzuki Hayabusa Ram Air Seals - Schnitz Racing

Part Number CT1001 These instructions are written to be comprehensive and detailed to make the installation of this product go as smoothly as possible. No instructions can be a substitute for the mechanical experience necessary to properly complete this project. Therefore, if after reviewing this document you have any doubts about your skills or experience we strongly urge you to seek professional assistance. 1999-2007 Models: Remove seat and raise the fuel tank. Remove airbox and air filter. Cover the throttlebodies with a clean towel or rag to prevent any debris from entering. Remove foam from airbox inlets and remove the raise lip with a hot knife and/or rotary tool. Make sure the ram air sleeves slide easily onto the inlets. Clean the airbox with a low pressure air gun and remove all debris. Apply Permatex Silicon to the beginning and the outside (not inside where the air flows) and slide the sleeve onto the air inlet tubes. Immediately reinstall the airbox onto the engine and tighten all fasteners. Slide the sleeve towards the frame until they touch and align them so they are flush. Allow the Permatex to dry. Roll the rubber seals onto the frame so the gap is covered. A small screwdriver is helpful to roll the bottom. Reinstall the air filter, fuel tank, and seat.

IPCC AR4 Chapter 10 - Global Climate Projections

The future climate change results assessed in this chapter are based on a hierarchy of models, ranging from AtmosphereOcean General Circulation Models (AOGCMs) and Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity (EMICs) to Simple Climate Models (SCMs). These models are forced with concentrations of greenhouse gases and other constituents derived from various emissions scenarios ranging from nonmitigation scenarios to idealised long-term scenarios. In general, we assess non-mitigated projections of future climate change at scales from global to hundreds of kilometres. Further assessments of regional and local climate changes are provided in Chapter 11. Due to an unprecedented, joint effort by many modelling groups worldwide, climate change projections are now based on multi-model means, differences between models can be assessed quantitatively and in some instances, estimates of the probability of change of important climate system parameters complement expert judgement. New results corroborate those given in the Third Assessment Report (TAR). Continued greenhouse gas emissions at or above current rates will cause further warming and induce many changes in the global climate system during the 21st century that would very likely be larger than those observed during the 20th century. Mean Temperature All models assessed here, for all the non-mitigation scenarios considered, project increases in global mean surface air temperature (SAT) continuing over the 21st century, driven mainly by increases in anthropogenic greenhouse gas concentrations, with the warming proportional to the associated radiative forcing. There is close agreement of globally averaged SAT multi-model mean warming for the early 21st century for concentrations derived from the three non-mitigated IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES: B1, A1B and A2) scenarios (including only anthropogenic forcing) run by the AOGCMs (warming averaged for 2011 to 2030 compared to 1980 to 1999 is between +0.64°C and +0.69°C, with a range of only 0.05°C). Thus, this warming rate is affected little by different scenario assumptions or different model sensitivities, and is consistent with that observed for the past few decades (see Chapter 3).

What's In a Name? Global Warming Versus Climate Change

This report is based on findings from a bi-annual series of nationally representative survey studies – Climate Change in the American Mind – conducted by the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication (http://environment.yale.edu/climate-communication) and the George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication (http://www.climatechangecommunication.org). The research was funded by the Energy Foundation, the 11th Hour Project, the Grantham Foundation, and the V.K. Rasmussen Foundation. Principal Investigators: Anthony Leiserowitz, PhD Yale Project on Climate Change Communication School of Forestry & Environmental Studies Yale University anthony.leiserowitz@yale.edu Geoff Feinberg Yale Project on Climate Change Communication School of Forestry & Environmental Studies Yale University geoffrey.feinberg@yale.edu Seth Rosenthal, PhD Yale Project on Climate Change Communication School of Forestry & Environmental Studies Yale University seth.rosenthal@yale.edu Nicholas Smith, PhD Division of Psychology and Language Sciences University College London nicholas.smith@ucl.ac.uk Ashley Anderson, PhD Department of Journalism & Technical Communication Colorado State University ashley.a.anderson@colostate.edu Connie Roser-Renouf, PhD Center for Climate Change Communication Department of Communication George Mason University croserre@gmu.edu

Climate Change Home - World Bank
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Development and Climate Change: A Strategic Framework for the World Bank Group Contents Executive summary .......................................................................................................................... i 1. INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................................1 2. Implementation Progress: Supporting Country-led Climate Actions......................................... 5 3. Implementation Progress: Mobilizing Finance and Markets ................................................... 18 4. Implementation Progress: Fostering Innovation, Knowledge, and Capacity ........................... 32 5. Implementation Progress: Global Impact through Strategic Partnerships ................................ 39 6. Institutional Arrangements and Results .................................................................................... 43 7. Emerging Lessons and Directions.............................................................................................. 46 Annexes Annex 1. Implementation Progress for Key Actions and Deliverables .........................................54 Annex 2. IFC Climate-Positive Investments and Innovation ........................................................62 Annex 3. Addressing Climate Change–Related Programs in the World Bank Regions ..............65 Annex 4. Climate Investment Funds .............................................................................................78 Annex 5. Main Climate Finance Instruments the WBG can use ...................................................80 Boxes Box 1. Several COP-15 Outcomes Are Important for the WBG’s Development Mandate .......................... 3 Box 3. Climate Issues in Country Assistance/Partnership Strategies ........................................................... 6 Box 4. Scaling Up Adaptation Efforts Across Sectors and Regions—Highlights from FY09 ..................... 8 Box 5. Disaster Response Management and the Climate Change Adaptation Nexus .................................. 9 Box 6. Programmatic Approaches to Addressing Climate Change in Agriculture and Rural Development .................................................................................................................................................................... 10 Box 7. Promoting Urban Energy-Efficient Programs and Sustainable Energy Planning ........................... 11 Box 9. Scaling Up Renewable Energy Markets .......................................................................................... 13 Box 10. World Bank Group Experience Financing Energy Efficiency ...................................................... 14 Box 11. Energy Access for Sustainable Development................................................................................ 15 Box 12. Flared Gas Reduction for Energy Access in Africa ...................................................................... 16 Box 13. Multistakeholder Partnership for the Urban Transport Transformation Project (UTTP) in Mexico .................................................................................................................................................................... 17 Box 14. CTF: Thirteen Investment Plans Endorsed with an Overall Funding Envelope of $4.4 billion Leveraging additional $36 billion ............................................................................................................... 19 Box 15. Piloting Climate Resilience ........................................................................................................... 21 Box 16. IDA as a Platform for Climate-Smart Development ..................................................................... 23 Box 17. Carbon Finance: Building on Experience and Looking Forward .................................................. 24 Box 19. Innovation in Catastrophe Weather-Risk Financing ..................................................................... 26

Detection and Attribution of Climate Change: from Global to Regional

Atmospheric Temperatures More than half of the observed increase in global mean surface temperature (GMST) from 1951 to 2010 is very likely1 due to the observed anthropogenic increase in greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations. The consistency of observed and modeled changes across the climate system, including warming of the atmosphere and ocean, sea level rise, ocean acidification and changes in the water cycle, the cryosphere and climate extremes points to a large-scale warming resulting primarily from anthropogenic increases in GHG concentrations. Solar forcing is the only known natural forcing acting to warm the climate over this period but it has increased much less than GHG forcing, and the observed pattern of long-term tropospheric warming and stratospheric cooling is not consistent with the expected response to solar irradiance variations. The Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation (AMO) could be a confounding influence but studies that find a significant role for the AMO show that this does not project strongly onto 1951–2010 temperature trends. {10.3.1, Table 10.1} It is extremely likely that human activities caused more than half of the observed increase in GMST from 1951 to 2010. This assessment is supported by robust evidence from multiple studies using different methods. Observational uncertainty has been explored much more thoroughly than previously and the assessment now considers observations from the first decade of the 21st century and simulations from a new generation of climate models whose ability to simulate historical climate has improved in many respects relative to the previous generation of models considered in AR4. Uncertainties in forcings and in climate models’ temperature responses to individual forcings and difficulty in distinguishing the patterns of temperature response due to GHGs and other anthropogenic forcings prevent a more precise quantification of the temperature changes attributable to GHGs. {9.4.1, 9.5.3, 10.3.1, Figure 10.5, Table 10.1} GHGs contributed a global mean surface warming likely to be between 0.5°C and 1.3°C over the period 1951–2010, with the contributions from other anthropogenic forcings likely to be between –0.6°C and 0.1°C, from natural forcings likely to be between –0.1°C and 0.1°C, and from internal variability likely to be between –0.1°C and 0.1°C. Together these assessed contributions are consistent with the observed warming of approximately 0.6°C over this period. {10.3.1, Figure 10.5} It is virtually certain that internal variability alone cannot account for the observed global warming since 1951. The observed global-scale warming since 1951 is large compared to climate model estimates of internal variability on 60-year time scales.

FINAL Deep Dive Report - Federal Railroad Administration

This report of the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) on its safety assessment of the MetroNorth Commuter Railroad (Metro-North), called Operation Deep Dive, is provided to Congress pursuant to report language in the Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 Omnibus Appropriations Act. Metro-North is the second largest commuter railroad in the Nation, serving New York, Connecticut, and New Jersey, with an annual ridership of almost 83 million people. MetroNorth is a subsidiary agency of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA), a New York State Authority. In 2013, four high-profile accidents occurred on Metro-North (Appendix 1). • On May 17, 2013, in Bridgeport, Connecticut, an accident occurred on Metro-North’s New Haven Line, when an eastbound Metro-North train of 8 cars, traveling 74 mph, derailed and came to rest on an adjacent track. Approximately 20 seconds later, a westbound Metro-North train on that adjacent track struck the derailed train. As a result of the accident, more than 50 people, some seriously injured, were hospitalized, rail operations were suspended, and millions in property damage occurred. • On May 28, 2013, a second accident occurred when a Metro-North train in West Haven, Connecticut, that was traveling 70 mph, struck and killed a Metro-North maintenance-ofway (MOW) employee who was part of a roadway work group performing railroad maintenance on a construction project. • On July 18, 2013, a third accident occurred when a CSX Transportation freight train derailed while traveling over Metro-North’s system. No one was injured, but property damage was significant. • On December 1, 2013, the fourth accident occurred when a Metro-North train of 7 cars traveling south from Poughkeepsie, New York, to Grand Central Terminal in New York City, derailed as it approached the Spuyten Duyvil Station. All cars derailed and the front cab came to rest close to the Harlem River. Four passengers were killed, and more than 70 were injured. Rail operations were suspended, and millions of dollars in property damage alone was sustained. On December 3, 2013, 2 days after the fourth and most serious of these accidents, FRA sent a letter to MTA expressing support for Governor Andrew Cuomo’s directive that MTA hold a safety stand-down, and directing Metro-North to implement a Confidential Close Call Reporting System (C3RS) (Appendix 2). Additionally, FRA issued Emergency Order 29 and Safety Advisory 2013-08. • Emergency Order 29, issued on December 6, 2013, required Metro-North to take immediate action to prevent excessive train speeds by identifying and prioritizing highrisk areas, modifying its existing signal system to ensure speed limits are obeyed, and 1 requiring a higher level of engagement and communication among operating crewmembers in areas in which major speed restrictions are in place. • Safety Advisory 2013-08, issued on December 10, 2013, urged railroads to provide additional training, increase the frequency of operational testing, and reinforced the importance of communication between crew members. The purpose was to ensure that all railroads adhere to Federal regulations and railroad operating rules regarding maximum authorized train speed limits.

Minuteman Lead Vacuum Ships Free

Minuteman Model C82985-06 critical filter HEPA vacuum with a 6 gallon capacity has been specifically designed for safe removal of hazardous material like lead, asbestos and mold in industrial / construction environments.

2/3 Bhk affordable luxury residential apartments

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