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Curriculum Vitae - Student Affairs

Curriculum Vitae Because your resume or curriculum vita (CV) is usually the first and sometimes the only thing an employer will see about you, it is often the most critical item in determining whether or not you will obtain an interview. These essential elements of the job search serve as an advertisement of your skills, knowl­ dge, and relevant experience. e Tips for preparing a resume can be found on page 22. What Is the Difference between a Resume and a Curriculum Vita? Resume Curriculum Vita Purpose Outlines your personal, edu­ ational and work related c experiences Length One- or two-page document Focus Strengths and qualifications for a particular position Yes Comprehensive summary of your educational and professional experience, including publications, presentations, professional activities, honors, and additional information Generally three or more pages in length, depending on your qualifications and level of experience Comprehensive biographical statement Objective Statement Included? Used in application for these types of positions Business, non-profit, other nonacademic positions No Faculty, research, clinical, or scientific positions If you are uncertain whether to use a resume or vita, ask yourself “Am I sending this document to other Ph.D.s? Is my Ph.D. required for this position? Is my scholarship relevant for this position?” If the answers to those questions are yes, you are proba­ ly going to use a b vita. As a general rule of thumb, unless a vita is requested, you should send a resume.

Writing a Curriculum Vitae [.pdf] - Carnegie Mellon University

Writing a Curriculum Vitae Curriculum Vitae vs. Resume A resume is a 1-2 page brief summary of education and experience used to demonstrate qualifications for a position or type of position. A curriculum vitae (CV) is a 3 or more page detailed biographical statement emphasizing qualifications and professional activities in detail. A CV is used for advanced positions in research and higher education and may be used for other positions when requested. For most job seekers, a resume is all that you will need. However, it may be useful to develop a CV as you further your education and achieve professional accomplishments. Why a Curriculum Vitae Besides using your CV to get a job upon graduation, it can also be used in other ways: 1.A supporting document to include when submitting a grant or funding proposal 2.A requirement for an annual review with your employer 3.A requirement for membership to a professional society 4.A requirement for applying to medical school 5.A background statement to be used to develop an introduction for a professional presentation at a conference or meeting

Writing a Curriculum Vitae - Weber State University

What Makes a Curriculum Vitae Stand Out? You'll generate a better response with your curriculum vitae if it is well organized and is packed with relevant information to match and support your professional, academic or research objective. As a Job Placement Specialist for the University of Washington, Bothell I worked with students submitting curriculum vitaes for graduate programs. In this capacity, I applied several unique strategies when writing each curriculum vitae. The first was to prioritize and list the most relevant academic, research, volunteer or work history experience first within the curriculum vitae. The second was to include an Objective and Summary of Qualifications section at the top of each C.V. The third was to incorporate many of the strategies and resume writing techniques you'll learn by perusing the resume tips in this site as well as in my sister site which offers 40 Free Resume and Job Search Workshops. These strategies proved to be extremely effective and boosted the acceptance rate of students applying for highly competitive graduate programs - many of which accepted only one to twelve students out of 300 to 600 applicants. My endeavors and success in this arena were recognized and commented on by the Director of Student Activities as a result of students reporting their acceptance into graduate programs. Preparing effective C.V.'s presents a unique challenge due to length, which can make them boring and result in important data being buried or lost in such a long document. As a result, prioritizing your top skills and experience to be presented in the first or uppermost section of your C.V. makes sense. Then detail additional educational, employment or academic experience. In this way you will maximize important criteria which you do not want to be overlooked by academic or hiring committees. Who Needs A Curriculum Vitae?

Writing a Curriculum Vitae (CV) - Brown University

Writing a Curriculum Vitae (CV) Information accessible online by logging into Careers in Medicine (http://www.aamc.org/students/cim/). - Click on “Getting into Residency” - Click on “Writing a Curriculum Vitae (CV)” The first of many supporting documents you'll need for the residency application process is a curriculum vitae (CV). A CV is concise summary of relevant information about your background and accomplishments, particularly relating to your academic and work experience. Since much of the application process is electronic, the use of a CV to apply to programs is limited. The ERAS system will generate a CV for you automatically, but the format is very basic. While you may not need to send a separate CV with your applications, it's helpful to have one prepared anyway. Most of the information you include on a CV will also be required for the your residency application - having it all in one place on a CV will make writing your application and personal statement easier. Your school may also request a CV to aid in the preparation of your Medical School Performance Evaluation (MSPE). Lastly, you should provide a CV to faculty members who will write your letters of recommendation. Creating a CV takes time, but it's a tool you'll use throughout your professional life. You'll need to present complete but succinct information that will provide an overview of your qualifications. A CV is a living document that represents you -- properly constructed and with periodic updates, the CV you develop now can be used throughout your career.

Running head: WRITING RESEARCH PAPERS 1 A Guide for ...

An abstract is a brief comprehensive summary of the paper between 150 and 250 words. Do not add to or comment on the body of the work here. It provides the reader with a brief overview of the article. This paper is a guide to writing a general paper in according to the Publication Manual Type the abstract in block format, one paragraph, no indentations and double spaced. of the American Psychological Association. The guide instructs a user on how to format a paper in APA style, illustrating structure, style and content, as well as presenting detailed examples of references cited, including print examples of books, magazine articles and reference works. Additional examples are provided for electronic versions of the above. There are several different types of articles appropriate for publication in the APA or American Psychological Association style. These include reports of empirical 1 inch margins on all sides studies, literature reviews, theoretical articles, methodological articles, and case studies. Each of these types of articles follows a proscribed format. Refer to the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition for the most up to date 1 inch margins on all sides. Leave right side ragged and do not hyphenate words.

Formal Research APA Sample Paper
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Some assignments will call for an abstract. An abstract is a summary of your paper. An abstract should be short and concise but include the topic of your paper, the main points you are writing about, and the conclusions you reach. Do not indent the 1st line of your Abstract It should be written in block format Include a brief sentence summary for all sections of your paper. An abstract is typically 150-250 words long. Your paper should: word Introduction as a heading. It is understood that the opening paragraph of your paper is your introduction. The APA suggests the following set up for an * be double spaced * have 1 inch margins introduction: Introduce the problem, explore the importance of the problem, describe relevant scholarship, and explain your approach to solving the problem. This may vary depending on your assignment. * be typed in Times font * indent paragraphs ½ inch or 5-7 spaces The Body of your Paper Headings should After you write the introduction, you will develop the body of the paper. be boldfaced, centered, and all major words In a formal psychology paper documenting an experiment, the standard capitalized structure for an experiment is: Method, Results, Discussion. Each of these Footnotes can be used to provide additional information sections would use a heading to guide the reader through the paper. The paper ends with References, Footnotes, Appendices and Supplemental Materials1. Consult the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association

Letters of Support Example Letter of Support:

Example Letter of Support: February 1, 2006 Ms. Mary E. Wilfert NCAA CHOICES Program P.O. Box 6222 Indianapolis, Indiana 46206-6222 Dear Ms. Wilfert: It is my pleasure write a letter in support of the proposal (name) being submitted to the CHOICES Program by our (name dept) at Albion College. Something here about writer’s relationship/knowledge of situation and how project/program will impact it. In conclusion, I fully support the efforts of the (Dept) as they seek external funding to support a program designed to (whatever you are targeting). EX “Any programs that can help our students make better decisions about drinking and its consequences will benefit our students, campus, and the community at large.” In other words, you need a very concise and strong closing summary statement. Sincerely, (original signature “John Doe” here) John Doe Vice President for Student Affairs

Internet Payday Lending: - Consumer Federation of America

Internet Payday Lending: How High-Priced Lenders Use the Internet to Mire Borrowers in Debt and Evade State Consumer Protections November 30, 2004 Executive Summary • Payday lending has expanded from check cashing outlets, pawn shops and payday loan outlets to the Internet. Loans are marketed, delivered and collected online at rates and terms that mire cashstrapped consumers in repeat borrowing at extremely high costs. Finance charges are in the $25 (650% APR) to $30 (780% APR) per $100 borrowed range, with built in loan flipping in many contracts. • Web sites marketing and/or delivering small loans are growing rapidly, with numerous referral sites feeding applications to actual lenders. Lenders are hard to locate, identify or contact. Some are licensed in their home states, while others hide behind anonymous domain registrations or are located outside the United States. • Banks are involved in Internet payday loans through the Automated Clearing House System (ACH) used to electronically deliver loans to consumers’ bank accounts and to withdraw payments. County Bank of Rehoboth Beach, DE, participates directly in Internet payday lending. • Internet payday lenders bypass state usury laws and consumer protections by locating in lax regulatory states and making loans without complying with licensing requirements or state protections in the borrower’s home state. State regulators, notably in Kansas, New York and Colorado, are beginning to enforce state usury and small loan laws against lenders making loans online to state consumers. • Payday loan applications made online expose consumers to privacy and security risks as bank account numbers, Social Security numbers, and other personal financial information are transmitted to lenders, often over unsecure web links. Privacy policies do not protect privacy. • Federal electronic banking laws and industry self regulatory rules for use of the Automated Clearing House (ACH) system do not adequately protect consumers who use electronic fund transfers to borrow and repay loans from bank accounts.

Estimates of the Legal Permanent Resident Population in 2012

This report presents estimates of the legal permanent resident (LPR) population living in the United States on January 1, 2012. LPRs, also known as “green card” holders, are immigrants who have been granted lawful permanent residence in the United States but have not yet become U.S. citizens. Estimates of the total LPR population and the LPR population eligible to apply to naturalize are tabulated by country of birth, state of residence, and the year LPR status was obtained. Data for the estimates were obtained primarily from administrative records of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). The methodology used for the 2012 estimates is similar to that used in previous DHS estimates (see Rytina, 2012). In summary, an estimated 13.3 million LPRs lived in the United States on January 1, 2012, and 8.8 million of them were eligible to naturalize. The majority (61 percent) obtained LPR status in 2000 or later.

Summary and Recommendations of the Fifth ... - Diabetes Care

Thus, for the interim, the participants of the Fifth International Workshop-Conference on GDM endorsed a motion to continue use of the definition, classification criteria, and strategies for detection and diagnosis of GDM that were recommended at the Fourth Workshop-Conference. Those guidelines are reproduced (with minor modifications) in this article in APPENDIX Tables 1 and 2. he Fifth International WorkshopConference on Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) was held in Chicago, IL, 11–13 November 2005 under the sponsorship of the American Diabetes Association. The meeting provided a forum for review of new information concerning GDM in the areas of pathophysiology, epidemiology, perinatal outcome, long-range implications for mother and her offspring, and management strategies. New information and recommendations related to each of these major topics are summarized in the report that follows. The issues regarding strategies and criteria for the detection and diagnosis of GDM were not reviewed or discussed in detail, since it is anticipated that the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) study will provide data in mid-2007 that will foster the development of criteria for the diagnosis SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS — The invited lectures, topical discussions, and posters presented at the conference and the invited manuscripts that appear in this issue of Diabetes Care served as the basis for the following summary and recommendations.

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