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How to Find the Right Estate agents Pimlico SW1

Welcome to CENTURY 21 Westminster. Paul Corcut and his team are proud to represent CENTURY 21 in Westminster.Pimlico SW1 and Victoria SW1 Belgravia Central London offering professional property management Westminster SW1 related advice.

Cardiac Stem Cell Therapy and the Promise of Heart Regeneration

Perspective Cardiac Stem Cell Therapy and the Promise of Heart Regeneration Jessica C. Garbern1 and Richard T. Lee2,* 1Department of Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA Stem Cell Institute, the Brigham Regenerative Medicine Center and the Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA *Correspondence: rlee@partners.org http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.stem.2013.05.008 2Harvard Stem cell therapy for cardiac disease is an exciting but highly controversial research area. Strategies such as cell transplantation and reprogramming have demonstrated both intriguing and sobering results. Yet as clinical trials proceed, our incomplete understanding of stem cell behavior is made evident by numerous unresolved matters, such as the mechanisms of cardiomyocyte turnover or the optimal therapeutic strategies to achieve clinical efficacy. In this Perspective, we consider how cardiac stem cell biology has led us into clinical trials, and we suggest that achieving true cardiac regeneration in patients may ultimately require resolution of critical controversies in experimental cardiac regeneration. Introduction The race is on: throughout the world, basic and clinical investigators want to be the first to identify new approaches to regenerate cardiac tissue and to prove the effects of these therapies in patients with heart disease. Despite substantial progress in treating many types of heart disease, the worldwide heart failure burden will remain enormous through this century. The potential of stem cells and the scope of the heart failure problem have fueled a stampede to be the first to achieve human heart regeneration. Cell transplantation approaches are attractive given their...

Stem Cell Therapy: the ethical issues - Nuffield Council on Bioethics

Stem Cell Therapy: the ethical issues a discussion paper Published by Nuffield Council on Bioethics 28 Bedford Square London WC1B 3EG Telephone: Fax: Email: Website: 020 7681 9619 020 7637 1712 bioethics@nuffieldfoundation.org http://www.nuffieldfoundation.org/bioethics April 2000 © Nuffield Council on Bioethics 2000 All rights reserved. Apart from fair dealing for the purpose of private study, research, criticism or review, no part of the publication may be produced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form, or by any means, without prior permission of the copyright owners. Nuffield Council on Bioethics Professor Ian Kennedy (Chairman) Professor Martin Bobrow CBE (Deputy Chairman) Professor Tom Baldwin Professor Sir Kenneth Calman KCB FRSE* Reverend Professor Duncan Forrester DD Professor Brian Heap CBE FRS Mrs Rebecca Howard Lady Hornby Professor John Ledingham Mr Derek Osborn CB Professor Catherine Peckham CBE Professor Martin Raff FRS Mr Nick Ross Professor Herbert Sewell Professor Albert Weale FBA * (co-opted member of Council for the period of his Chairmanship of the Working Party on the ethics of healthcare-related research in developing countries) The terms of reference are as follows: 1 to identify and define ethical questions raised by recent advances in biological and medical research in order to respond to, and to anticipate, public concern; 2 to make arrangements for examining and reporting on such questions with a view to promoting public understanding and discussion; this may lead, where needed, to the formulation of new guidelines by the appropriate regulatory or other body; 3 in the light of the outcome of its work, to publish reports; and to make representations, as the Council may judge appropriate. The Nuffield Council on Bioethics is funded jointly by the Medical Research Council, the Nuffield Foundation and the Wellcome Trust Attendees of the Round Table meeting on Stem Cell Therapy: the ethical issues Professor Martin Bobrow CBE, Department of Medical Genetics, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research and Deputy Chairman of Nuffield Council on Bioethics Professor Tom Baldwin, Department of Philosophy, University of York, member of Nuffield Council on Bioethics Lady Hornby, Chairman of The Kingwood Trust, member of Nuffield Council on Bioethics...

Stem cell therapy is helping horses with tendon and ... - Vet-Stem

Ultrasound is used to precisely guide the injection of adipose-derived stem cells into the suspensory ligament. The still-developing technology of stem cell therapy, which uses unspecified cells from the horse’s body, has the potential to help racehorses heal sounder than ever before. A tendon is a bundle of elastic fibers, mostly made of collagen, that attaches muscle to bone and helps move the skeleton. Ligaments are similar but attach bone to bone and provide stability. When a horse bows a tendon, it tears the fibers at a certain point of the tendon (the location results in a name, such as high or low bow), weakening it significantly. When the tendon begins to knit back together, it is significantly hampered by lack of blood flow. Blood provides several healing mechanisms, including adult stem cells, which are able to convert themselves into specific types of cells the body needs to heal itself (in this case, tendon cells). If the tendon does not get enough help, it eventually develops scar tissue, which weakens the tendon because it is nonelastic and haphazardly knitted together. The injury takes a long time to heal – a typical racetrack cure was pinfiring or blistering, followed by six months to a year of turnout. If a horse was brought back to the track and the tendon had mostly healed with scar tissue, the weakened tendon could give way and the injury recur.

US Back to School 2013 - Apple
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QUALIFYING LOCATIONS: Qualifying Products (as defined below) must be purchased from the U.S. Apple Online Store for Education Individuals, from a U.S. Apple Retail Store, by calling 1-800-MY-APPLE, or from an Apple Authorized Campus Store on the list at www.apple.com/promo/bts/participants.html (collectively, “Qualifying Locations”). iPhone devices must be purchased from Apple; Apple Authorized Campus Store iPhone purchases are not eligible. Only purchases made in the 50 United States or the District of Columbia are eligible. All shipments of Qualifying Products must be made to an address in the 50 United States or the District of Columbia. Orders for Qualifying Products from the U.S. Apple Online Store for Education Individuals or 1-800-MY-APPLE that are placed during the above promotion period and ship after the offer ends are eligible. EDUCATION INDIVIDUAL PURCHASE QUALIFICATIONS: Those eligible to purchase as Education Individuals include faculty, staff, students, and parents as follows: K–12: Any employee of a public or private K–12 institution in the United States is eligible. In addition, school board members who are currently serving as elected or appointed members are eligible. PTA or PTO executives currently serving as elected or appointed officers are eligible. Higher Education: Faculty and staff of higher education institutions; and students attending or accepted into a higher education institution are eligible. Higher Education Parents: Parents purchasing on behalf of their child, who is a student currently attending or accepted into a public or private higher education institution in the United States, are eligible. PRODUCT ELIGIBILITY: Only the following Apple products qualify for this promotion: Qualifying Apple Computers: iMac, MacBook Pro, MacBook Air, and Mac Pro. Qualifying iPhone: iPhone 4, iPhone 4S, and iPhone 5.

MacBook Air User's Guide (Manual) - Support - Apple

Congratulations, you and your MacBook Air were made for each other. Built-in iSight camera Video chat with up to three friends anywhere in the world at the same time. www.apple.com/macbookair Mac Help isight Finder Browse the contents of your computer using Cover Flow. Time Machine Automatically back up your files to an extra hard drive. www.apple.com/macosx www.apple.com/macosx Mac Help Mac Help finder time machine iMovie Collect all your video in one library. Create and share movies in minutes. iPhoto Organize all your photos with Events. Publish to a Web Gallery with a click. www.apple.com/ilife/imovie www.apple.com/ilife/iphoto iMovie Help iPhoto Help movie GarageBand Create music by adding musicians to a virtual stage. Enhance your song to sound like a pro. www.apple.com/ilife/garageband GarageBand Help record photo iWeb Create beautiful websites with photos, movies, blogs, podcasts, and dynamic web widgets. www.apple.com/ilife/iweb iWeb Help website Contents Chapter 1: Ready, Set Up, Go 8 9 10 15 16 19 22 Welcome What’s in the Box Setting Up Your MacBook Air Setting Up DVD or CD Sharing Migrating Information to Your MacBook Air Getting Additional Information onto Your MacBook Air Putting Your MacBook Air to Sleep or Shutting It Down Chapter 2: Life with Your MacBook Air 26 28 30 32 34 35 Basic Features of Your MacBook Air Keyboard Features of Your MacBook Air Ports on Your MacBook Air Using the Trackpad and Keyboard Running Your MacBook Air on Battery Power Getting Answers Chapter 3: Problem, Meet Solution 40 Problems That Prevent You from Using Your MacBook Air 44 Using Apple Hardware Test Contents

MetroNorth 1007.indd - MetroNorth Chamber of Commerce

PARTY LIKE THE MOBSTERS AND MOLLS AT METRONORTH’S “GANGSTER GALA” Back in the Roaring Twenties, gangsters reportedly knew how to party better than anybody. Next month, members of the Chamber can prove they know how to have even more fun than the mobsters and molls of those bygone days. MetroNorth and ECM Publishers will present the "Gangster Gala" on Friday, October 26, at the Schwan Center in Blaineís National Sport Center. It will run from 5:00 to 10:30 p.m. This event is a wonderful opportunity for MetroNorth members and their guests to come together to celebrate. Not only will attendees have a great time, but they will also help raise money for the general operating fund that keeps the Chamber running. prefer, you can just give us a call and weíll have some of our henchmen pick them up at your place and take them for a ride. We'd like to have all silent auction items by October 16. The deadline to be listed in the program is October 20. We're expecting a mob to attend, so make your reservations early. Tickets are $75 each. Classic gangster attire is optional, but fun. You can't have a great party without music. Our sponsors are the ones who make it all possible. ECM Publishers is sponsoring at the "Band Leader" level of $5,000. You can take your place on Festivities will include a gourmet A key to the success of our "Gangster our stage by sponsoring at these levels: Italian dinner buffet including a glass Gala" is the silent auction. Please Crooner ($2,500), Sax ($1,500), Bass of wine. The dinner will be provided by consider donating an item or two or ($1,000), Trumpet ($500), and Trombone Spectacular Catering, and will definitely three. No item is too small or too large. ($250). Help us make beautiful music in live up to their name. In appreciation of your generosity, you the coming year by joining our band! will be recognized in our program as well The Chamber appreciates your support. There will be music and dancing with the as on our Web site. Classic Big Band and the Nostalgics Vocal Have a great time at the gala! Quartet. You'll also be able to acquire some You can deliver or mail your silent auction exciting items simply by making an offer items to the MetroNorth Chamber of our Silent Auction people can't refuse. Commerce at 9380 Central Ave. NE, Suite #320, Blaine, MN 55434. If you ...

The Age of Consequences - Center for Strategic and International ...

The Foreign Policy and National Security Implications of Global Climate Change About the Authors Kurt M. Campbell is CEO and co-founder of the Center for a New American Security and former deputy assistant secretary of defense for Asia and the Pacific. Leon Fuerth is a research professor of international affairs at The George Washington University, and former national security advisor to Vice President Al Gore. Jay Gulledge, Ph.D., is the senior scientist and program manager for science and impacts at the Pew Center on Global Climate Change. Alexander T. J. Lennon is the editor-in-chief of CSIS’s flagship journal, The Washington Quarterly. J.R. McNeill is a professor of history at Georgetown University. Derek Mix is a research associate in the CSIS Europe Program. Peter Ogden is senior national security analyst at the Center for American Progress. John Podesta is president and CEO of the Center for American Progress and former chief of staff for President Bill Clinton. Julianne Smith is the director of the CSIS Europe Program and the Initiative for a Renewed Transatlantic Partnership. Richard Weitz is a senior fellow and director of program management at Hudson Institute. R. James Woolsey is a vice president for Booz Allen Hamilton and former director of the CIA. Production Notes Paper recycling is reprocessing waste paper fibers back into a usable paper product. Soy ink is a helpful component in paper recycling. It helps in this process because the soy ink can be removed more easily than regular ink can be taken out of paper during the de-inking process of recycling. This allows the recycled paper to have less damage to its paper fibers and have a brighter appearance. The waste that is left from the soy ink during the de-inking process is not hazardous and it can be treated easily through the development on modern processes.

European and Global Climate Change Projections - ClimateCost

2.4°C to 3.4°C rise in global temperature by the period 2071-2100 (A1B)1 • nalysis of the future impacts and economic costs of climate change A requires climate models. These models require inputs of future greenhouse gas emissions, based on modelled global socio-economic scenarios, to make projections of future changes in temperature, precipitation and other meteorological variables. • he ClimateCost project has considered three emissions scenarios: T a medium-high non-mitigation baseline scenario (A1B); a mitigation scenario (E1), which stabilises global temperature change at about 2°C above pre-industrial levels; and a high-emission scenario (RCP8.5). • Under a medium-high emission baseline (A1B), with no mitigation, the climate models considered in ClimateCost show that global average temperatures could rise by between 1.6°C and 2.3°C by 2041-2070, and 2.4°C and 3.4°C by 2071-2100, relative to the modelled baseline period used in the project of 1961-1990. However, the models project much larger temperature increases for Europe in summer, and strong regional differences across countries, for example, the Iberian Peninsula has a mean projected increase of up to 5°C by 2071-2100. 1.5°C rise in global temperature with mitigation (E1)1 Uncertainty in the climate projections between emissions scenarios and climate models for Europe is considerable These values are reported for a future average time period over 30 years, relative to a 1961-1990 baseline. They report the Ensembles Project results used in the ClimateCost project, not the full IPCC AR4 range. 1 02/03 2/2 European and Global Climate Change Projections • The differences in the precipitation projections between the models are much greater and the distributional patterns across Europe are more pronounced than for temperature. Nonetheless, there are some robust patterns of change. There are wetter winters projected for Western and Northern Europe. By contrast, there are drier conditions projected all year for Southern Europe, where summer precipitation could be reduced by 50% by the end of the century. In other parts of Europe, the changes are more uncertain, and the models even project differences in the direction of change (i.e. whether increases or decreases will occur).

Climate change flyer05-05_fin.qxp - National Academies

Joint science academies’ statement: Global response to climate change Climate change is real There will always be uncertainty in understanding a system as complex as the world’s climate. However there is now strong evidence that significant global warming is occurring1. The evidence comes from direct measurements of rising surface air temperatures and subsurface ocean temperatures and from phenomena such as increases in average global sea levels, retreating glaciers, and changes to many physical and biological systems. It is likely that most of the warming in recent decades can be attributed to human activities (IPCC 2001)2. This warming has already led to changes in the Earth's climate. The existence of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere is vital to life on Earth – in their absence average temperatures would be about 30 centigrade degrees lower than they are today. But human activities are now causing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases – including carbon dioxide, methane, tropospheric ozone, and nitrous oxide – to rise well above pre-industrial levels. Carbon dioxide levels have increased from 280 ppm in 1750 to over 375 ppm today – higher than any previous levels that can be reliably measured (i.e. in the last 420,000 years). Increasing greenhouse gases are causing temperatures to rise; the Earth’s surface warmed by approximately 0.6 centigrade degrees over the twentieth century. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) projected that the average global surface temperatures will continue to increase to between 1.4 centigrade degrees and 5.8 centigrade degrees above 1990 levels, by 2100.

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