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A Concise History of Early American Period Furniture

• Stanley D. Saperstein, Master – 30 Years Experience; Woodcarver, Joiner, Finisher, Designer, Cabinet & Furniture Maker, Antique Conservationist. – Formal Seven Year Apprenticeship w/ C.N. Grinnell – Founder Artisans of the Valley, 1973. – Director of Preservation for The Swan Foundation, NJ National Guard Museum, Camp Olden Civil War Round Table. • Eric M. Saperstein, Journeyman – 15 Years Experience; Woodcarver, Joiner, Finisher, Designer, Cabinet & Furniture Maker, Antique the Valley Artisans of www.artisansofthevalley.com Conservationist. • Artisans of the Valley - Hand Crafted Custom Woodworking – Founded 1973 in Ewing, NJ and Moved to Pennington in 1979 – Transferred to Eric in 2001. – Specializing in Antique Restoration, Period Reproductions, Woodcarving, and Furniture & Cabinetmaking. Artisans of the Valley www.artisansofthevalley.com

NGA | Masterpieces of American Furniture from the Kaufman ...

Masterpieces of American Furniture from the Kaufman Collection, 1700 – 1830 offers visitors to the nation’s capital an unprecedented opportunity to view some of the finest furniture made by colonial and post-revolutionary American artisans. This presentation includes more than one hundred objects from the promised gift, announced in 2010, of the collection formed by Linda H. Kaufman and the late George M. Kaufman. From a rare Massachusetts William and Mary japanned dressing table to Philadelphia’s outstanding rococo expressions and the early and later classical styles of the new federal republic, the Kaufman Collection presents a compendium of American artistic talent over more than a century of history. This promised gift marks the Gallery’s first acquisition of American decorative arts and dramatically transforms the collection, complementing the existing holdings of European decorative arts.

Tumor node metastasis (TNM) staging classification for ... - SAPYCC

The tumor node metastasis (TNM) staging system for breast cancer is an internationally accepted system used to determine the disease stage. This disease stage is a measure of the extent of disease, which is used to guide management and determine prognosis. The 7th edition of the TNM staging system and the evidence supporting it are described here (table 1). The 6th edition of the TNM staging system is included for comparison (table 2). The initial evaluation, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of breast cancer are reviewed elsewhere. (See "An overview of breast cancer and treatment for early stage disease" and "Initial staging work-up for women with a diagnosis of breast cancer" and "Clinical decisions in systemic adjuvant therapy for early breast cancer".) TNM STAGING SYSTEM — The tumor node metastasis (TNM) staging system for breast cancer is based upon a retrospective analysis of survival in diverse samples of patients representing all stages of disease. It reflects the clinical evaluation methods and treatments that are applied to the particular study population. Periodic revisions are necessary because advanced imaging techniques and treatments evolve and impact survival. The 7th edition of the TNM staging system is the most recent version (table 1) [1]. It replaces the 6th edition of the TNM staging system (table 2) [2]. REVISIONS IN BREAST CANCER STAGING — Observed survival rates for 211,645 breast cancer cases diagnosed in years 2001-2002 and entered into the National Cancer Data Base (Commission on Cancer of the American College of Surgeons and the American Cancer Society) were used to reevaluate the prognostic value of the TNM descriptors.

Purposes and Principles of Cancer Staging - Sutter Medical ...

The extent or stage of cancer at the time of diagnosis is a key factor that defines prognosis and is a critical element in deter­ mining appropriate treatment based on the experience and outcomes of groups of prior patients with similar stage. In addition, accurate staging is necessary to evaluate the results of treatments and clinical trials, to facilitate the exchange and comparison of information among treatment centers, and to serve as a basis for clinical and translational cancer research. At a national and international level, the agreement on classi­ fications of cancer cases provides a method of clearly convey­ ing clinical experience to others without ambiguity. Several cancer staging systems are used worldwide. Dif­ ferences among these systems stem from the needs and objectives of users in clinical medicine and in population surveillance. The most clinically useful staging system is the tumor node metastasis (TNM) system maintained collabor­ atively by the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) and the International Union for Cancer Control (UICC). The TNM system classifies cancers by the size and extent of the primary tumor (T), involvement of regional lymph node (N), and the presence or absence of distant metasta­ ses (M), supplemented in recent years by carefully selected nonanatomic prognostic factors. There is a TNM staging algorithm for cancers of virtually every anatomic site and histology, with the primary exception in this manual being staging of pediatric cancers.

Lung Cancer - Rush University Medical Center

The End of Nihilism Until now, >50% present with Stage IV Everything is getting smaller Screening IS beneficial: smaller tumors Minimally Invasive Surgery: smaller incisions Stereotactic Radiotherapy: smaller radiation field Molecular Diagnostics ©2006 RUSH University Medical Center 2009 Estimated US Cancer Deaths* Men 290,890 Lung and bronchus Prostate Colon and rectum Pancreas Leukemia Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma 32% 10% 10% 5% 4% 4% Women 272,810 25% Lung and bronchus 15% 10% 6% 6% 4% Breast Colon and rectum Ovary Pancreas Leukemia • ~160,440 patients will die of NSCLC in 2010 American Cancer Society. At: http://www.cancer.org/docroot/STT/stt_0.asp. Accessed October 27, 2009. ©2006 RUSH University Medical Center Lung Cancer Linked to Smoking JAMA May 27, 1950 Tobacco Smoking as a possible etiologic factor in bronchiogenic carcinoma. A study of six hundred and eighty-four proved cases Ernest L. Wynder and Evarts A. Graham ©2006 RUSH University Medical Center Cum. Risk of Lung CA in UK Men Data from Sirs Doll & Peto unequivocally demonstrates that the risk of lung CA after smoking never returns to normal Vineis, P. et al. JNCI 2004;96:99-106 Copyright restrictions may apply. ©2006 RUSH University Medical Center

Cancer of the esophagus and esophagogastric junction

Previous American Joint Committee on Cancer/International Union Against Cancer (AJCC/UICC) stage groupings for esophageal cancer have not been data driven or harmonized with stomach cancer. At the request of the AJCC, worldwide data from 3 continents were assembled to develop data-driven, harmonized esophageal staging for the seventh edition of the AJCC/UICC cancer staging manuals. METHODS: All-cause mortality among 4627 patients with esophageal and esophagogastric junction cancer who underwent surgery alone (no preoperative or postoperative adjuvant therapy) was analyzed by using novel random forest methodology to produce stage groups for which survival was monotonically decreasing, distinctive, and homogeneous. RESULTS: For lymph node-negative pN0M0 cancers, risk-adjusted 5-year survival was dominated by pathologic tumor classification (pT) but was modulated by histopathologic cell type, histologic grade, and location. For lymph node-positive, pNþM0 cancers, the number of cancer-positive lymph nodes (a new pN classification) dominated survival. Resulting stage groupings departed from a simple, logical arrangement of TNM. Stage groupings for stage I and II adenocarcinoma were based on pT, pN, and histologic grade; and groupings for squamous cell carcinoma were based on pT, pN, histologic grade, and location. Stage III was similar for histopathologic cell types and was based only on pT and pN. Stage 0 and stage IV, by definition, were categorized as tumor in situ (Tis) (high-grade dysplasia) and pM1, respectively.

American Joint Committee on Cancer/International Union ... - Books

*Note: A tumor may penetrate the muscularis propria with extension into the gastrocolic or gastrohepatic ligaments, or into the greater or lesser omentum, without perforation of the visceral peritoneum covering these structures. In this case, the tumor is classified T3. If there is perforation of the visceral peritoneum covering the gastric ligaments or the omentum, the tumor should be classified T4. **The adjacent structures of the stomach include the spleen, transverse colon, liver, diaphragm, pancreas, abdominal wall, adrenal gland, kidney, small intestine, and retroperitoneum. ***Intramural extension to the deodenum or esophagus is classified by the depth of the greatest invasion in any of these sites, including the stomach. Reprinted with the permission of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC), Chicago, Illinois. The original source for this material is the AJCC Cancer Staging Manual, Seventh Edition (2010) published by Springer Science and Business Media LLC, www.springer.com. Stomach. In: Edge SE, Byrd DR, Carducci MA, Compton CC, eds. AJCC Cancer Staging Manual. 7th ed. New York, NY: Springer; 2010:117-126.

Running head: WRITING RESEARCH PAPERS 1 A Guide for ...

An abstract is a brief comprehensive summary of the paper between 150 and 250 words. Do not add to or comment on the body of the work here. It provides the reader with a brief overview of the article. This paper is a guide to writing a general paper in according to the Publication Manual Type the abstract in block format, one paragraph, no indentations and double spaced. of the American Psychological Association. The guide instructs a user on how to format a paper in APA style, illustrating structure, style and content, as well as presenting detailed examples of references cited, including print examples of books, magazine articles and reference works. Additional examples are provided for electronic versions of the above. There are several different types of articles appropriate for publication in the APA or American Psychological Association style. These include reports of empirical 1 inch margins on all sides studies, literature reviews, theoretical articles, methodological articles, and case studies. Each of these types of articles follows a proscribed format. Refer to the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition for the most up to date 1 inch margins on all sides. Leave right side ragged and do not hyphenate words.

Formal Research APA Sample Paper
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Some assignments will call for an abstract. An abstract is a summary of your paper. An abstract should be short and concise but include the topic of your paper, the main points you are writing about, and the conclusions you reach. Do not indent the 1st line of your Abstract It should be written in block format Include a brief sentence summary for all sections of your paper. An abstract is typically 150-250 words long. Your paper should: word Introduction as a heading. It is understood that the opening paragraph of your paper is your introduction. The APA suggests the following set up for an * be double spaced * have 1 inch margins introduction: Introduce the problem, explore the importance of the problem, describe relevant scholarship, and explain your approach to solving the problem. This may vary depending on your assignment. * be typed in Times font * indent paragraphs ½ inch or 5-7 spaces The Body of your Paper Headings should After you write the introduction, you will develop the body of the paper. be boldfaced, centered, and all major words In a formal psychology paper documenting an experiment, the standard capitalized structure for an experiment is: Method, Results, Discussion. Each of these Footnotes can be used to provide additional information sections would use a heading to guide the reader through the paper. The paper ends with References, Footnotes, Appendices and Supplemental Materials1. Consult the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association

APA-Formatted Research Proposal - Vanguard University of ...

The role of the perceived gender of an infant and the gender of adolescents on ratings of the infant will be explored. Thirty-six junior high students (18 boys and 18 girls) will view a photo of a 3-month-old infant. Students will be told the infant’s name is either “Larry,” “Laurie,” or they will not be told the infant’s name. Each student will rate the infant on 6 bipolar adjective scales (firm/soft, big/little, strong/weak, hardy/delicate, well coordinated/awkward, and beautiful/plain). It is predicted that both the name assigned to the infant and the students’ gender will affect ratings. Implications of the results for parenting and for future research will be discussed.Effect of Infant’s Perceived Gender on Adolescents’ Ratings of the Infant Many researchers agree that gender role socialization begins at the time of an infant’s birth (Haugh, Hoffman, & Cowan, 1980; Honig, 1983). Most parents are extremely interested in learning whether their newborn infant is a boy or a girl, and intentionally or not, this knowledge elicits in them a set of expectations about sex role appropriate traits (Rubin, Provenzano, & Luria, 1974). Empirical research suggests that these initial expectations, which form the basis of gender schemas (Leone & Robertson, 1989), can have a powerful impact on parents’ perceptions of and behavior toward infants (Fagot, 1978; Lewis, 1972). Gender contributes to the initial context within which adults respond to an infant and may become an influential agent in the socializing process and the development of the child’s sense of self (Berndt & Heller, 1986). Stereotyped expectations may influence gender role socialization and the acquisition of sex-typed behavior through a self-fulfilling prophecy process (Darley & Fazio, 1980). Preconceived gender-based expectations may cause the parent to elicit expected behavior from the infant and to reinforce expected behavior when it occurs; this would confirm the parents’ initial expectations.

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