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Resume objective examples for ojt as medical transcriptionist

JO Tea & Sweeteners  honey raw
by Justorganik 0 Comments favorite 8 Viewed Download 0 Times

ORGANIC SWEETENERS Brand name: - JustOrganik Product Category:- Sweeteners Product Description:- Just Organik provides you a healthy morning boost with a complete range of black tea, green tea, kashmiri kahwa tea, Masala tea. Just Organik also offers a very elegant gift box with a combination of Tea Sticks, Tea Bags, Loose Tea, Tea Infuser, Organik Honey, Organik Raw Sugar & Organik Teas. Honey-Raw forest- Direct from the Bee hives this honey contains no preservatives. It is as pure as flower nectars. Use for medical purpose like soothing your cough, for beauty purpose, for getting nutrition, for boosting your memory, for treating your wounds or use it as workout fuel. Honey is a multi-tasker. Include the original and pure organic honey in your diet and feel the difference.

Medical Reception Training
by medtrain 0 Comments favorite 10 Viewed Download 0 Times

In today’s world there is no dearth of job opportunities, as long as one is ready to find what field they are interested in and go ahead and explore the options available. There are many courses that are aimed only at obtaining jobs

The Desire To Act
by LifeSaverTeamCPR 0 Comments favorite 9 Viewed Download 0 Times

LifeSaver Team CPR is careful to only select instructors who are highly educated and experienced and can ensure that every student leaves with the necessary skillset to treat victims correctly when faced with a medical emergency.

Cell therapy medical tourism: Time for action - Celltherapysociety.org

Department of Research and Development, Hospira Inc., Lake Forest, Illinois, USA, 2Department of Medical Ethics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, 3Advanced Centre for Biochemical Engineering, University College London, London, UK, 4The Stop ALD Foundation, Houston, Texas, USA, 5Interdisciplinary Oncology Program, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, Tampa, Florida, USA, 6Department of Regulatory Affairs, Perkin Elmer Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, 7Bone Marrow Transplantation Unit, National Cancer Institute, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 8Section of Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplantation Unit, University Hospital, Cremona, Italy, 9Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, 10Department of Cell and Molecular Therapies, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital RPA Hospital and Centenary Institute, Newtown, NSW Australia, 11Research Foundation for , Community Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, and 12Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA Key Words: cell therapy, stem cell, medical tourism, medical ethics, informed consent, regulatory affairs

Patient Advisory for Stem Cell Therapy and Medical Tourism

August 2013 Patient Advisory for Stem Cell Therapy and Medical Tourism As stakeholders in cellular therapy, the undersigned professional organizations believe it is necessary to share the following important message with patients and families contemplating cell therapy or experimental stem cell procedures. In this document, best practices are outlined to assist patients and family members in their healthcare decisions. Controlled innovation in the context of patient safety is paramount as potential therapeutic products or procedures are researched, tested, advanced and proven. Our organizations have received questions and concerns from patients and this document presents an opportunity to address them. Introduction Advancement of clinical therapies is best done in the setting of rigorous and formal clinical trials and in a structured regulatory framework. This helps assure that safety considerations, professional peer review, and the management of patient rights and obligations are considered and addressed. Some procedures would be considered standard of care, because scientific studies have shown that they are safe and effective. Not all procedures offered to patients in all regions of the world are tested in this manner and not all geographical regions have regulations for cellular therapies or patient protection. Additionally, it is possible that some practitioners may offer stem cell procedures without following the existing regulations. Patients may be seeking treatment for incurable, potentially untreatable diseases and may be susceptible to false promises or may not have access to all of the information needed to make this important decision. As patients and families contemplate voluntarily ...

Cardiac Stem Cell Therapy and the Promise of Heart Regeneration

Perspective Cardiac Stem Cell Therapy and the Promise of Heart Regeneration Jessica C. Garbern1 and Richard T. Lee2,* 1Department of Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA Stem Cell Institute, the Brigham Regenerative Medicine Center and the Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA *Correspondence: rlee@partners.org http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.stem.2013.05.008 2Harvard Stem cell therapy for cardiac disease is an exciting but highly controversial research area. Strategies such as cell transplantation and reprogramming have demonstrated both intriguing and sobering results. Yet as clinical trials proceed, our incomplete understanding of stem cell behavior is made evident by numerous unresolved matters, such as the mechanisms of cardiomyocyte turnover or the optimal therapeutic strategies to achieve clinical efficacy. In this Perspective, we consider how cardiac stem cell biology has led us into clinical trials, and we suggest that achieving true cardiac regeneration in patients may ultimately require resolution of critical controversies in experimental cardiac regeneration. Introduction The race is on: throughout the world, basic and clinical investigators want to be the first to identify new approaches to regenerate cardiac tissue and to prove the effects of these therapies in patients with heart disease. Despite substantial progress in treating many types of heart disease, the worldwide heart failure burden will remain enormous through this century. The potential of stem cells and the scope of the heart failure problem have fueled a stampede to be the first to achieve human heart regeneration. Cell transplantation approaches are attractive given their...

Stem Cell Therapy: the ethical issues - Nuffield Council on Bioethics

Stem Cell Therapy: the ethical issues a discussion paper Published by Nuffield Council on Bioethics 28 Bedford Square London WC1B 3EG Telephone: Fax: Email: Website: 020 7681 9619 020 7637 1712 bioethics@nuffieldfoundation.org http://www.nuffieldfoundation.org/bioethics April 2000 © Nuffield Council on Bioethics 2000 All rights reserved. Apart from fair dealing for the purpose of private study, research, criticism or review, no part of the publication may be produced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form, or by any means, without prior permission of the copyright owners. Nuffield Council on Bioethics Professor Ian Kennedy (Chairman) Professor Martin Bobrow CBE (Deputy Chairman) Professor Tom Baldwin Professor Sir Kenneth Calman KCB FRSE* Reverend Professor Duncan Forrester DD Professor Brian Heap CBE FRS Mrs Rebecca Howard Lady Hornby Professor John Ledingham Mr Derek Osborn CB Professor Catherine Peckham CBE Professor Martin Raff FRS Mr Nick Ross Professor Herbert Sewell Professor Albert Weale FBA * (co-opted member of Council for the period of his Chairmanship of the Working Party on the ethics of healthcare-related research in developing countries) The terms of reference are as follows: 1 to identify and define ethical questions raised by recent advances in biological and medical research in order to respond to, and to anticipate, public concern; 2 to make arrangements for examining and reporting on such questions with a view to promoting public understanding and discussion; this may lead, where needed, to the formulation of new guidelines by the appropriate regulatory or other body; 3 in the light of the outcome of its work, to publish reports; and to make representations, as the Council may judge appropriate. The Nuffield Council on Bioethics is funded jointly by the Medical Research Council, the Nuffield Foundation and the Wellcome Trust Attendees of the Round Table meeting on Stem Cell Therapy: the ethical issues Professor Martin Bobrow CBE, Department of Medical Genetics, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research and Deputy Chairman of Nuffield Council on Bioethics Professor Tom Baldwin, Department of Philosophy, University of York, member of Nuffield Council on Bioethics Lady Hornby, Chairman of The Kingwood Trust, member of Nuffield Council on Bioethics...

Patient Handbook on Stem Cell Therapies - A Closer Look at Stem ...

W e have all heard about the extraordinary promise that stem cell research holds for the treatment of a wide range of diseases and conditions. However, there is a lot of work still needed to take this research and turn it into safe and effective treatments. The International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) is very concerned that stem cell therapies are being sold around the world before they have been proven safe and effective. Stem cell therapies are nearly all new and experimental. In these early stages, they may not work, and there may be downsides. Make sure you understand what to look out for before considering a stem cell therapy. Remember, most medical discoveries are based on years of research performed at universities and companies. There is a long process that shows first in laboratory studies and then in clinical research that something is safe and will work. Like a new drug, stem cell therapies must be assessed and meet certain standards before receiving approval from national regulatory bodies to be used to treat people. What does this really mean for you as a patient, doctor, friend or family member? Below we hope to answer some of your questions on stem cells and stem cell therapies and give you the resources you and your doctor need to make the best decisions possible for treatment. The ISSCR is a non-profit professional stem cell research organization with a commitment to ensure the promise of stem cell research is delivered to patients in a safe, effective and fair manner.

Stem cell therapy in a caprine model of osteoarthritis - Wiley Online ...

Stem Cell Therapy in a Caprine Model of Osteoarthritis J. Mary Murphy,1 David J. Fink,1 Ernst B. Hunziker,2 and Frank P. Barry1 Objective. To explore the role that implanted mesenchymal stem cells may play in tissue repair or regeneration of the injured joint, by delivery of an autologous preparation of stem cells to caprine knee joints following induction of osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. Adult stem cells were isolated from caprine bone marrow, expanded in culture, and transduced to express green fluorescent protein. OA was induced unilaterally in the knee joint of donor animals by complete excision of the medial meniscus and resection of the anterior cruciate ligament. After 6 weeks, a single dose of 10 million autologous cells suspended in a dilute solution of sodium hyaluronan was delivered to the injured knee by direct intraarticular injection. Control animals received sodium hyaluronan alone. Results. In cell-treated joints, there was evidence of marked regeneration of the medial meniscus, and implanted cells were detected in the newly formed tissue. Degeneration of the articular cartilage, osteophytic remodeling, and subchondral sclerosis were reduced in cell-treated joints compared with joints treated with vehicle alone without cells. There was no evidence of repair of the ligament in any of the joints. Conclusion. Local delivery of adult mesenchymal stem cells to injured joints stimulates regeneration of meniscal tissue and retards the progressive destruction normally seen in this model of OA.

YMCA of Metro North Camp pre-interview for Camp Counselors.

YMCA of Metro North Camp pre-interview for Camp Counselors. As part of the pre-interview process please answer and submit the following questions below along with your employment application and resume (optional). You can use the provided space or submit typed answers. You can scan and email your paperwork to Gregg Ellenberg at gellenberg@metronorthymca.org or drop them off at the YMCA camp you are applying to. Once your responses are received, we will determine whether we feel that you would be a strong candidate for our camps. If so, we will contact you to set up an interview. Please note that there are mandatory training dates on Saturday, June 14th and Saturday, June 21st (Camp Eastman and Camp Sachem) that are required to work camp for the summer. The safety and well-being of our campers is of utmost importance. Before you can work at the YMCA of Metro North, you must undergo an intensive background check that includes but is not limited to an examination of your criminal history (a CORI and SORI check) and the National Sex Offender Registry; 4 references checked; two in person interviews; several hours of Child Abuse prevention training; and First Aid and CPR/AED certification. If you are not comfortable with this process, please seek employment elsewhere.

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