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Pendahuluan kerja kursus matematik tambahan 2010

The cornrow row - Devereux Chambers
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School’s policy to allow girls but not boys to wear hair in cornrows did not amount to less favourable treatment on grounds of sex. I n G (by his litigation friend) v The Head Teacher and Governors of St Gregory’s Catholic Science College [2011] EWHC 1452 (Admin), [2011] All ER (D) 113 (Jun), the High Court considered the lawfulness of a school’s ban on boys wearing cornrows (hair braids), which the claimant (“G”) contended was discriminatory on grounds of race and sex. The school’s policy was considered under the Equality Act 2010. The relevant sections were stated to be no different in their substantive effect from the previous related sections of the Race Relations Act 1976 and the Sex Discrimination Act 1975. Background facts G is of African-Caribbean ethnicity. In accordance with his family tradition he has never cut his hair and it is kept in cornrows. G was due to commence his secondary education at St Gregory’s Catholic Science College (“the school”) in September 2009. The school’s uniform and appearance policy required boys to have a “short back and sides” haircut. Girls were permitted to have long hair, which could be tied back in cornrows. G was not prepared to cut his hair and when he arrived for his first day at school he was turned away because of noncompliance with the policy. He now attends a different school where he is allowed to wear cornrows. Indirect race discrimination claim G had to establish that there was a group of which he was a member which suffered a “particular disadvantage” by the “provision, criterion or practice” of ...

Another Hair Piece - Georgetown Law Journal

* Professor of Law, Charles M. and Marion J. Kierscht Scholar, University of Iowa. J.D., University of Michigan Law School; B.A., Grinnell College. E-mail: angela-onwuachi@uiowa.edu. © 2010, Angela Onwuachi-Willig. Thanks to Dean Carolyn Jones and Charles M. and Marion J. Kierscht for their research support. My research assistants Christie Canales and Matt McMurrer provided invaluable assistance. I especially thank Professor Paulette Caldwell for beginning this conversation about black women, hair, and grooming codes with her article, A Hair Piece: Perspectives on the Intersection of Race and Gender, 1991 DUKE L.J. 365. I also thank Michelle Adams, Rachel Anderson, Mario Barnes, Shanna Benjamin, Randy Bezanson, Arthur Bonfield, Devon Carbado, Bob Chang, Miriam Cherry, Carin Crain, Marion Crain, Angela Davis, Tai Duncan, Karla Erickson, Catherine Fisk, Tom Gallanis, Tristin Green, Wendy Greene, Aya Gruber, Lani Guinier, Mitu Gulati, Don Herzog, Kevin Johnson, Trina Jones, Robin Lenhardt, Nancy Levit, Natasha Martin, Marcia McCormick, Ann McGinley, Rachel Moran, Melissa Murray, Richard Primus, Daria Roithmayr, Bertrall Ross, Paul Secunda, Jessica Silbey, Catherine Smith, Peggie Smith, Rose Cuison Villazor, Adrien Wing, Rachel Wortman, and Kimberly Yuracko for their helpful comments and support on this Essay. Finally, I give special thanks to my husband, Jacob Willig-Onwuachi, and our children, Elijah, Bethany, and Solomon for their constant love and support. This project gained much from comments at the Nineteenth Annual Midwestern People of Color Legal Scholarship Conference at the University of Iowa College of Law, the Lutie A. Lytle Black Women Law Faculty Workshop at Seattle University School of Law, the 2009 Southeastern Association of Law Schools (SEALS) Conference, the Iowa Legal Studies Workshop, and the University of Michigan Law School Legal Theory Workshop.

Oil & Natural Gas Transportation & Storage Infrastructure - American ...

Over the past five years, unconventional oil and gas activity has thrust the nation into an unexpected position. The U.S. is now the global growth leader in crude oil production capacity growth, adding nearly 1.2 million barrels per day (mbd) of capacity over the 2008 – 2012 time period1. In addition, the U.S. is now the largest natural gas producer, at 65 billion cubic feet (Bcf) per day2. At the same time, unconventional activity is spurring the growth of natural gas liquids (NGLs) production, adding over 500,000 barrels of oil equivalent (boe) per day since 20083. This has brought the total increase in liquids production capacity to some 1.7 mbd since 2008. Driven by growth in U.S. natural gas, natural gas liquids, and crude oil, the past 2 years have witnessed rapid growth in direct capital investment toward oil and gas infrastructure assets. IHS estimates that capital spending in oil and gas midstream and downstream infrastructure has increased by 60 percent, from $56.3 billion in 2010 to $89.6 billion in 2013. This increase in capital spending has provided both an economic stimulus and an incisive data point into how shale driven oil and gas production is reshaping the U.S. oil and gas infrastructure landscape. As this period of high infrastructure investment, which began after the 2008-2009 financial recession, continues to progress it will largely reverse a macro energy infrastructure trend that began taking shape in the early 1970’s. Many of the major oil and gas infrastructure investments made for the past 30 years have been premised under the assumption of decreasing domestic production, increasing energy imports, and the need to move imported...

The Future of Natural Gas - MIT Energy Initiative

Foreword and Acknowledgements The Future of Natural Gas is the fourth in a series of MIT multidisciplinary reports examining the role of various energy sources that may be important for meeting future demand under carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions constraints. In each case, we explore the steps needed to enable competitiveness in a future marketplace conditioned by a CO2 emissions price or by a set of regulatory initiatives. This report follows an interim report issued in June 2010. The first three reports dealt with nuclear power (2003), coal (2007) and the nuclear fuel cycle (2010 and 2011). A study of natural gas is more complex than these previous reports because gas is a major fuel for multiple end uses — electricity, industry, heating — and is increasingly discussed as a potential pathway to reduced oil dependence for transportation. In addition, the realization over the last few years that the producible unconventional gas resource in the U.S. is very large has intensified the discussion about natural gas as a “bridge” to a low-carbon future. Recent indications of a similarly large global gas shale resource may also transform the geopolitical landscape for gas. We have carried out the integrated analysis reported here as a contribution to the energy, security and...

Easy Transfer Cable for Windows® 7 - Farnell

Easy Transfer Cable for Windows® 7 Easily migrate your user accounts, music, photos, documents, and more, to a new PC running Windows 7 Part # F5U279ea Upgrading to a new computer has never been easier. The Belkin Easy Transfer Cable is the quickest way to migrate files, music, photos, user accounts - and more from your Windows XP or Windows Vista PC to your new Windows 7 PC. Features q q q q belkin.co.uk Fastest way to migrate files, music, photos, user accounts - and more - from your Windows XP or Windows Vista PC to your new Windows 7 PC. Designed specifically for Windows “Easy” Transfer utility from Microsoft Improved Software, Interface and User Experience from Microsoft Refreshed & improved industrial design Belkin Ltd Rushden, United Kingdom © 2010 Belkin International, Inc. All rights reserved. All trade names are registered trademarks of respective manufacturers listed. PID_508917 Package Includes q q q Easy Transfer Cable for Windows 7 Quick Install Guide Installation CD for the source PC System Requirements Pentium® processor-based computer (both systems), USB port (both systems) One destination PC running Windows 7 (32- or 64-bit) and available USB port One source PC running Windows® XP (32- or 64-bit) or Windows Vista® (32- or 64-bit) and available USB port 40MB hard-disk space and CD-ROM drive on source PC running Windows XP or Windows Vista...

Summary of 2009 Monovalent H1N1 Influenza Vaccine Data ...

Summary of 2009 Monovalent H1N1 Influenza Vaccine Data – Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System Data through February 26, 2010 Please Note: These summaries are now being updated and posted monthly. CDC and FDA provide weekly updates on our vaccine safety monitoring activities in an effort to put the data that are publicly available through the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS; http://vaers.hhs.gov) and CDC’s website, WONDER (http://wonder.cdc.gov/vaers.html) in context. The following information summarizes adverse event reports to VAERS after the administration of 2009 H1N1 monovalent influenza vaccine (either nasal spray or shot). An adverse event is a health problem that is reported after someone gets a vaccine or medicine. Note that persons may experience adverse events shortly after vaccination which may or may not be caused by the vaccine. While VAERS is an important system for helping to find potential signs, VAERS is primarily used to detect signals that may require further investigation, but is not able to determine if an adverse event was caused by vaccination. VAERS Summary: • As of February 26, 2010, nearly 127 million doses of 2009 H1N1 vaccine had been shipped to vaccination providers in the United States, although the precise number of vaccines administered is unknown. • As of February 26, 2010, VAERS had received 10,172 adverse event reports following 2009 monovalent H1N1 vaccination. • The vast majority (93%) of adverse events reported to VAERS after receiving the 2009 monovalent H1N1 vaccine are classified as “non-serious” (e.g., soreness at the vaccine injection site). • Of the 10,172 reports, 636 (6%) were reports that were classified as “serious” health events (defined as life threatening or resulting in death, major disability, abnormal conditions at birth, hospitalization, or extension of an existing hospitalization)*.

Illinois H1N1 Vaccine Delivery Process - Illinois Department of ...

Illinois H1N1 Vaccine Delivery Process • The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) will provide states and some major U.S. cities with H1N1 vaccine and supplies (needles, syringes, sharps containers, alcohol swabs) at no cost. • In Illinois, the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) and the Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH) will receive vaccine and supplies. o CDPH will determine distribution within Chicago city limits. o IDPH will determine distribution for all areas of the state outside of Chicago city limits. • CDC will allocate supplies utilizing a population-based formula. o Illinois represents about 4.3 percent of the U.S. population Chicago is about 1 percent Outside Chicago is about 3.3 percent CDC announced that approximately 2 million doses of the Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine (LAIV) became available beginning Sept. 30, 2009. Illinois’ initial allocation of LAIV was 57,000 doses. Additional vaccine became available (prefilled syringes, multi-dose vials and LAIV) in midOctober and will continue to be allocated through January 2010. o CDC estimated approximately 28 million doses was available in the U.S. at the end of October and estimates that a total of 64 million doses will be available by the end of November. Estimated allotment to IDPH based on population (3.3%) at the end of November equates to about 2.1 million doses Estimated allotment to CDPH based on population (1%) would be 640,000 doses (These numbers are based on current information, are to be used for planning purposes and are subject to change.)

A38997_11-9 H1N1 Vaccination Policy Flyer - Blue Shield of ...

Helping your employees stay healthy this flu season Each year, influenza causes illness, hospitalizations, and deaths. This year, flu season is complicated by the emergence and rapid spread of the H1N1 virus (also known as “swine flu”) and the dangers associated with that flu strain. To help your employees stay well during this particular flu season, we’ve instituted a policy to encourage H1N1 vaccination, and developed some materials you can share with your employees about avoiding the flu. H1N1 vaccination policy The following policy for the 2009-2010 flu season is for fully insured and flex-funded health plans underwritten by Blue Shield of California and Blue Shield of California Life & Health Insurance Company: Blue Shield will cover the administrative costs of the H1N1 vaccine for all members of fully insured and flex-funded plans when the vaccination is given by a network provider. This means the applicable office visit copayment, usual deductible requirements, or coinsurance fees will be waived for the H1N1 vaccine. The cost of the H1N1 vaccine and equipment (such as needles, syringes, alcohol swabs, and sharps containers) will be fully paid by the U.S. government. If the member’s physician office visit includes other services, the usual cost share will apply for those services. Also, there will be no change to how the seasonal flu shot or other vaccines are covered – for non-H1N1 vaccines, the member is responsible for any copayment and plan deductible applicable to their plan as ...

BLICATIONS - World Tourism Organization UNWTO

The UNWTO World Tourism Barometer aims at providing all those involved in tourism with up-to-date statistics and adequate analysis, in a timely fashion. Issues cover short-term tourism trends, a retrospective and prospective evaluation of current tourism performance by the UNWTO Panel of Experts, and a summary of economic data relevant for tourism. The information is updated throughout the year. Available in English, French, Spanish and Russian Tourism Towards 2030 UNWTO Tourism Towards 2030 is UNWTO’s long-term outlook and assessment of future tourism trends from 2010 to 2030. It is a broad research project building on UNWTO’s on-going work in the field of long-term forecasting, initiated in the 1990s. Key outputs of the study are quantitative projections for international tourism flows up until 2030, based on data series on international tourist arrivals by subregion of destination, region of origin and mode of transport for the period 1980-2010. Available in English Key Outbound Tourism Markets in South-East Asia Asia and the Pacific is not only a major tourism destination region but also an increasingly important tourism outbound market. This study, a collaborative project between Tourism Australia (TA) and UNWTO, aims to provide an up-to-date perspective of the major tourism trends in five...

Regional markets
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Projects financed from open regional fund for Southeast Europe – regional networks Wild Beauty Biljana Bozovic National Tourism Organisation of Montenegro CEFTA week in Belgrade, 09 -11 November 2010 National Tourism Organisation of Montenegro Wild Beauty Mision Montenegro Customer Care +382 1300 / 31 digital information points www.montenegro.travel / E-learning program Belgrade, Serbia Our offices Abroad Frankfurt, Germany Sarajevo, Bosnia & Herzegovina CEFTA week in Belgrade, 09 -11 November 2010 www.montenegro.travel Wild Beauty • International markets EUEurope & Russia • Local market • Regional markets …three markets CEFTA week in Belgrade, 09 -11 November 2010 Wild Beauty „Experience Wild Beauty” -CNN -Euronews -BBC -Travel Channel CEFTA week in Belgrade, 09 -11 November 2010 Wild Beauty “Joint Promotion and Increased Level of Safety of Nautical Tourism in Dubrovnik-Neretva County and Montenegrin Coast ” Hydrographic Institute of the Republic of Croatia (HHI) Hydrological and Meteorological Service of Montenegro (HI-M) University of Dubrovnik (DU), Maritime Department National Tourism Organisation of Montenegro (NTOMNE) CEFTA week in Belgrade, 09 -11 November 2010

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