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12-398 Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, Inc ...

(Slip Opinion) Syllabus NOTE: Where it is feasible, a syllabus (headnote) will be released, as is being done in connection with this case, at the time the opinion is issued. The syllabus constitutes no part of the opinion of the Court but has been prepared by the Reporter of Decisions for the convenience of the reader. See United States v. Detroit Timber & Lumber Co., 200 U. S. 321, 337. Each human gene is encoded as deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), which takes the shape of a “double helix.” Each “cross-bar” in that helix consists of two chemically joined nucleotides. Sequences of DNA nucleotides contain the information necessary to create strings of amino acids used to build proteins in the body. The nucleotides that code for amino acids are “exons,” and those that do not are “introns.” Scientists can extract DNA from cells to isolate specific segments for study. They can also synthetically create exons-only strands of nucleotides known as complementary DNA (cDNA). cDNA contains only the exons that occur in DNA, omitting the intervening introns. Respondent Myriad Genetics, Inc. (Myriad), obtained several patents after discovering the precise location and sequence of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, mutations of which can dramatically increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancer. This knowledge allowed Myriad to determine the genes’ typical nucleotide sequence, which, in turn, enabled it to develop medical tests useful for detecting mutations in these genes in a particular patient to assess the patient’s cancer risk. If valid, Myriad’s patents would give it the exclusive right to isolate an individual’s BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, and would give Myriad the exclusive right to synthetically create BRCA cDNA. Petitioners filed suit, seeking a declaration that Myriad’s patents are invalid under 35 U. S. C. §101. As relevant here, the District Court granted summary judgment to petitioners, concluding that Myriad’s claims were invalid because they covered products of nature. The Federal Circuit initially reversed, but on remand in light of Mayo Collaborative Services v. Prometheus Laboratories, Inc., 566 U. S. ___, the Circuit found both isolated DNA and cDNA patent eligible. Held: A naturally occurring DNA segment is a product of nature and not patent eligible merely because it has been isolated, but cDNA is patent eligible because it is not naturally occurring. Pp. 10–18. (a) The Patent Act permits patents to be issued to “[w]hoever invents or discovers any new and useful . . . composition of matter,” §101, but “laws of nature, natural phenomena, and abstract ideas” “ ‘are basic tools of scientific and technological work’ ” that lie beyond the domain of patent protection, Mayo, supra, at ___. The rule against patents on naturally occurring things has limits, however. Patent protection strikes a delicate balance between creating “incentives that lead to creation, invention, and discovery” and “imped[ing] the flow of information that might permit, indeed spur, invention...”

2006 Harley Davidson Street Bob Internal Handlebar Wiring 2008 ...

2006 Harley Davidson Street Bob Internal Handlebar Wiring 2008/06/12 A riders view of the wires. On the left hand grip they are the ones closest to the ground. The right grip has the wires, the throttle cables and the front brake line The project is running the electrical wiring for the hand switches through the handlebars. The wires are just plain ugly. Start by marking where all your hand controls are located and how the bars are currently mounted. I used a sharpie and just put some tick marks near the grips and by the center clamp. This makes putting everything back together easy. Also mark out where you want your holes to go. Take your time on these measurements. We need to remove the gas tank to get to the wires. Take the fuel pump fuse out, then start the bike. After it dies run the starter for three seconds. Then disconnect the high pressure fuel line (warning it sprays a little gas at you, use a rag to block it). Remove the instrument panel. Finish removing the gas tank. Disconnect the tube that allows the gas to flow from the left side to the right side. Make sure your container is large enough to catch all the gas. Cleanup all spilled gasoline. Remove the bolts that hold the tank on, disconnect the fuel gauge and the gas escape line from the fuel tank. There should be nothing holding the tank on now, just remove it. If you didnt drain all the gas you will spill some more all over.Now the tank is removed. Put it in a good place so that you wont knock it over on accident. Shim the brake lever according to the service manual. I used a small piece of cardboard. Remove the hand controls. Be careful not to strip the torx bolts. They are two different sizes (t25 and t27) however I didnt have a t27 torx bit, so I was just real careful. Remove the handlebars. Pull all the wiring out from under the frame so you can get to the connectors. It doesnt really look like a bike now. Try to keep your parts organized, dont let the dogs run by and knock your bolts around the garage floor. One last shot of the stripped bike. One thing I did do differently than the last time I took the bike apart: I tied a small piece of twine to the brake master cylinder and to the ceiling of the garage. This kept it upright and kept any brake fluid from leaking out. Put the handle bars in your vice. I used wooden blocks to keep from scratching the bars while rilling...

Using Excel: Frequency Distributions, Histograms ... - Cosmos

Using Excel: Frequency Distributions, Histograms, Scatterplots, Line Graphs • The Analysis ToolPak, available with all PC versions of Excel, can be used for many of the tasks found in a standard statistics course. Many of these tasks can be done without the ToolPak, but they are generally much easier if you have it. Here is how to install the the Analysis ToolPak for PC’s As of this writing, if you are running Excel 2008 or higher on a Mac, the analysis ToolPak is not available. There is an application called StatPlus:Mac LE which is a free version of the full StatPlus application. It can handle most of the tasks performed by the Analysis ToolPak and in it’s full version is probably superior - but that costs money. The free version does not have the Histogram function installed. This is a problem with no easy work-around. There are various histogram templates available on the web. • Frequency Distributions and Histograms with the ToolPak: 1. Put the data in a single column. 2. Create a column with the bin values (class boundaries). 3. Click on Data Analysis section under the DATA tab. 4. Click on Histogram. 5. In input range put in the cells that contain the data. 6. In the bin range put in the cells that contain the bin values (class boundaries). 7. Do not click labels unless you have included labels in the data entries. 8. Put in a range of cells for the output range (or click new worksheet ply) 9. Check the include chart option 10. Then Click OK. 11. Your frequency distribution and histogram should appear where you told Excel to place it. 12. In order to make the frequency distribution table look like an actual frequency distribution, you should edit the left column. Instead of the class boundaries (bin values), replace these with the actual classes such as 30-39, 40-49, . . .. This will automatically change the x-axis labels in the graph. 13. The histogram can be edited to look a lot better by clicking on the graph and choosing various options from the chart tools menu. I like the option which includes axis titles and a main title. 14. Technically, a histogram’s bars are adjacent to each other. To do this, right click one of the bars, and choose Format Data Series. From here you can set the Gap Width to zero and put in borders. 15. The trickiest part is getting the x-axis to look good. By default, the axis has the class boundaries under each bar. This is confusing. By editing the frequency table (a few steps back) the axis labels now have the actual classes. If you ask me, that is good enough. If you want to place the actual class boundaries on the x-axis, you must delete the x-axis label then insert a text-box with the appropriate boundary values positioned in just the right places. This is tricky and has to be re-scaled if you change the size of the graph. I’d rather have the actual class ranges under each bar and save myself the headache of creating a custom text box. • Histograms from a frequency distribution without the ToolPak: If you already have the frequency table (as in some of the homework problems), creating a histogram is quite easy using the bar-chart option in Excel and no ToolPak is necessary. 1. In the first column enter the classes as text. Format this column as text if necessary, otherwise you will get a double histogram (not what you want). In the second column enter the frequencies...

Dealing with Data in Excel 2010 - Academic Computer Center

Dealing with Data in Excel 2010 Excel provides the ability to do computations and graphing of data. Here we provide the basics and some advanced capabilities available in Excel that are useful for dealing with scientific data. Graphing Data Let’s consider graphing the data given below. Go to cell A5 click and hold while highlighting to cell B12.Then go to the Insert ribbon and click on Scatter to bring down the choices. If you move the cursor around on the choices, an explanation appears. In Excel, the scatter chart is the ONLY graph where the x-axis is treated as a numerical value. (On other charts the x-axis is treated as a category, even if numbers are entered). Most scientific plots of data, plot only the data points (“Scatter with only markers”). It is usually bad practice to “connect the dots” with lines. When you click on the scatter type, the graph should appear as seen on the screenshot below. Notice the data is highlighted (purple is x-axis and blue is the yaxis) and that the Chart Tools appear on the ribbon bar. One instance where you may want to use a different type of scatter plot is if you have non-linear data such as absorption spectra: in such cases using the “Scatter/ smooth lines” option may be appropriate.Click on the Layout ribbon (under Chart Tools, NOT “Chart Layouts” on the Design ribbon) as this is the most useful ribbon for charts. Here you can remove the gridlines, label the x and y axes, add a title, and maneuver the legend if needed. The Chart tools only appear if the graph is highlighted – click on the graph to get them. Clean up your graph at this point! One thing you cannot do in the layout section is change the text of the legend. To do this, you must rename the data series: right click anywhere in the chart and click Select Data… and the Select Data Source menu pops up.Select the series of data you wish to rename (Series 1 here) and click Edit. You can then rename the data series. This is handy if you have more than one data set on the graph and need to show a legend.You can also switch the x and y axes, or select a new set of data by clicking the value box next to the series X and Y values and highlighting the appropriate data...

Working with Data in Microsoft Excel 2010

[Not for Circulation] This document provides instructions for using the sorting and filtering features in Microsoft Excel, as well as working with multiple worksheets in the same workbook and printing options. Sorting Data Data in an Excel spreadsheet can be easily and quickly sorted in ascending or descending order – or an order of your choice. 1. Select a cell in the column in which you want to sort. 2. On the Home tab, in the Editing group, click Sort & Filter. Then select Sort A to Z or Sort Z to A. 3. If the contents of the selected cell are numeric, then the Sort & Filter options will be Sort Smallest to Largest or Sort Largest to Smallest. 4. If the contents of the selected cell are dates/times, then the Sort & Filter options will be Sort Oldest to Newest or Sort Newest to Oldest. 5. You can also create your own sorting order by making a custom list. a. In a range of cells, enter the values by which you want to sort. The ability to filter data is an invaluable resource. Filtered data displays only the rows that meet criteria that you specify and hides rows that you do not want displayed. After you filter data, you can copy, find, edit, format, chart, and print the subset of filtered data without rearranging or moving it. 1. Select a cell in the range in which you want to add a filter. 2. On the Home tab, in the Editing group, click Sort & Filter. Then select Filter. 3. This adds dropdown arrows next to each title in the header row. [Not for Circulation] 4. Click the dropdown arrow next to the column in which you want to apply the filter. Using the checkboxes, select the value(s) for your criteria. Click OK. 5. Your spreadsheet will now display only records that meet the criteria. The status bar will display a message indicating how many records were filtered. The column in which you applied the filter is indicated by a filter icon...

Corvallis garden resource guide - corvallisgarde - CorvallisGarden.net

Corvallis Garden Resource Guide Goods, Services, and Learning for Food Growing SUMMER 2013 EDITION Produced by the Corvallis Sustainability Coalition1 Welcome to the Summer 2013 Edition of the Corvallis Garden Resource Guide In this guide, we focus on food-growing, including resources for growing vegetables, fruit, herbs, mushrooms, and poultry. We emphasize organizations and businesses that are local, organic, unique, and perhaps not as well known as they should be. We’ve tried to be as complete and accurate as possible. We apologize for any omissions or errors. Send corrections and additions to Annette Mills at info@sustainablecorvallis.org for inclusion in later editions. You may also use this address to request copies of the guide for your event, organization, or business. Thanks to all the individuals and groups that provided suggestions and feedback. Special thanks go to Linda Johansen for proofreading and editorial suggestions on the original Guide, to Mark Luterra for editing subsequent editions, and to Sue Crawford for invaluable assistance with graphic design. Thank you to our sponsors Garland Nursery Home Grown Gardens Schmidt’s Garden Center Shonnard’s Nursery, Florist, and Landscape for their generous donations that allow us to distribute this edition free of charge. This guide was produced by members of the Food Action Team of the Corvallis Sustainability Coalition. Donations to support this project may be sent to Corvallis Sustainability Coalition, PO Box 2310, Corvallis, OR 97339. Make checks payable to Corvallis Sustainability Coalition, with “Garden Resource Guide” noted on the check. An online version of this guide is available at www.tinyurl.com/corvallisgarden. On the cover: The Guerena family of south Corvallis, with some of their harvest from the Sunrise Corner Community Garden. 2 Contents Gardening Knowledge............................................................................................... 4 Lectures, Classes, and Workshops.................................................................. 4 Publications (Online, Periodicals, Books)..................................................... 6 Neighborhood Gardening Groups......................................................................... 8 Growing Together........................................................................................................ 9 Community Gardens with Individual Plots................................................. 9 Community Gardens Worked Cooperatively.............................................10 Membership Gardens ........................................................................................11 Community Garden Map...................................................................................12 Getting What You Need..............................................................................................14 Garden Centers.....................................................................................................14 Garden Equipment and Supplies...................................................................14 Seeds........................................................................................................................16 Plant Starts..............................................................................................................17 Specialty Plants.....................................................................................................18 Mushrooms............................................................................................................18 Services....................................................................................................................19 Sharing the Bounty (Produce Donation).............................................................21 Backyard Poultry...........................................................................................................22 3 Gardening Knowledge LECTURES, CLASSES, AND WORKSHOPS Beaver State Permaculture The social networking site of the OSU Permaculture Program. Photos, videos, discussions, course announcements. www.beaverstatepermaculture.com Corvallis Oregon Tilth Garden Club Monthly potlucks, often with speakers. Summer garden tours. Colin or Carol • 541-758-0316 Edible Corvallis Initiative Corvallis Environmental Center, 214 SW Monroe Avenue. Offers a variety of classes throughout the year on many aspects of sustainable gardening and keeping poultry as well as a month-long Complete Organic Gardening course in the spring. http://www.corvallisenvironmentalcenter.org • 541-753-9211 Evening Garden Club Focused on ornamentals rather than food crops, but some of their lectures may be of interest to food gardeners, e.g. seed-starting, drip irrigation. Monthly meetings are held at OSU. Sally Olson-Edge • 541-758-4306 • xlerators1.esiteasp.com/egccorvallis/home.nxg Garden Centers See the list in the “Getting What You Need” section. They often present free lectures and demonstrations on a variety of topics. Visit their websites or sign up for their newsletters. Institute of BioWisdom at Sunbow Farm Sunday classes by Harry MacCormack and other local experts covering topics such as garden basics, pruning, soil, nutrition, cosmic influences, seed-saving, compost and compost tea. www.sunbowfarm.org/workshops.php Internships are also available. www.sunbowfarm.org/internships.php Master Gardener Program Live and online Master Gardener training program, semi-annual all-day conferences, “Gearing Up for Gardening” lectures at the Public Library. Free 4 phone and in-person gardening consultations. extension.oregonstate.edu/benton/horticulture/mg 541-766-6750 or 1-800-365-0201 Oak Creek Center for Urban Horticulture Learning laboratory for sustainable horticultural practices. Large demonstration garden, trial plots, research on green roofs, beekeeping, and numerous other projects. Urban poultry workshops, vertical herb gardening workshops, and vegetable tastings open to the public. horticulture.oregonstate.edu/occuh Al Shay • shayal@hort.oregonstate.edu • 541-207-8951 OSU Organic Growers Club Offers several paid summer farm internships for OSU students. cropandsoil.oregonstate.edu/content/get-involved James Cassidy • 541-737-6810 OSU Extension Service Office at 4077 SW Research Way. Online and print publications, bimonthly “Extension Express” newsletter. Demonstration garden at Fairgrounds. extension.oregonstate.edu/benton • 541-766-6750 Sunnyside Herbs Introductory classes on herbal medicine, emphasizing identification, cultivation, and preparation of one’s own medicines. Classes include medicinal plant starts from instructor’s garden. Jaci Guerena • 541-758-9156 SAGE (Starker Arts Garden for Education) In Starker Arts Park, SW 45th Pl. at Country Club Dr. Classes for low-income families. Summer camps for kids ages 5-11. Summer Youth Volunteer Corps (6th-11th grade). Internships with school credit. A project of the Corvallis Environmental Center. SAGE@corvallisenvironmentalcenter.org • 541-753-9211 Corvallis Sustainability Coalition Water Action Team Free classes on rainwater harvesting held at the First Alternative Co-op South Store. Dave Eckert • deckert@willamettewatershed.com • 541-230-1237 5 PUBLICATIONS Of the many good books, periodicals, and websites on food gardening, we recommend the following as especially helpful and relevant for our region. ONLINE Seed Ambassadors Project Unique information on winter gardening in our area, and on seed saving. www.seedambassadors.org Natural Gardening An online book about how to garden without poisons. library.oregonmetro.gov/files/09124w_natural_gardening_full_book.pdf PERIODICALS Corvallis Gazette-Times Sunday gardening columns. In Good Tilth • by Oregon Tilth A bimonthly gardening/farming magazine with many articles and classified ads in each issue. Available for free at the Co-op stores and downtown at the Tilth office: 260 SW Madison, Suite # 106. Mail subscriptions, with Tilth membership, are $30/yr. www.tilth.org • 503-378-0690 Extension Express • by OSU Extension Service A free bimonthly newsletter of the OSU Benton County Extension Service. Includes two pages of gardening information each issue. Has a monthly listing of recommended garden tasks. Free subscription. extension.oregonstate.edu/benton • 541-766-6750 BOOKS Garden Rhythm: A Year-Round Guide and Journal for the Maritime Northwest • by the Lane County Master Gardeners Association An attractive monthly guide with blank (unlined) pages for journal entries. 6 The Resilient Gardener: Food Production and Self-Reliance in Uncertain Times • by Carol Deppe The author is a very experienced Corvallis plant-breeder and gardener. The book discusses growing, storing, and using the five staple crops that she considers central to self-reliance: potatoes, corn, beans, squash, and eggs. Her chapter on “Labor and Exercise” is essential reading for any gardener with physical limitations. The Transition Document: Toward a Biologically Resilient Agriculture • by Harry MacCormack An in-depth discussion of soil biology, farming practices, nutrition, and other topics that Harry teaches in his workshops at the Sunbow Farm’s Institute of BioWisdom. Growing Your Own • by the OSU Extension Service A free 12-page guide. Covers site selection, raised beds, soil, bugs, diseases, composting. Includes a one-page chart of planting dates. A good place for the beginning gardener to start. The Northwest Herb Lover’s Handbook: A Guide to Growing Herbs for Cooking, Crafts, and Home Remedies • by Mary Preus The Maritime Northwest Garden Guide: Planting Calendar for YearRound Organic Gardening • by Seattle Tilth A 77-page book organized on a month-by-month basis. Growing Vegetables West of the Cascades: The Complete Guide to Organic Gardening • by Steve Solomon The “Bible” for many gardeners in our area. The 5th and 6th editions are very similar. He advises against using earlier editions, as some of his ideas have changed. Water-Wise Vegetables: For the Maritime Northwest Gardener • by Steve Solomon A comprehensive guide to growing with minimal irrigation. Gives much more detail about this topic than his “Growing Vegetables” book. Includes photos and diagrams of his garden. 7 Neighborhood Gardening Groups Avery Addition/Peanut Park In central Corvallis, near 7th and D St. Potlucks, work parties at Peanut Park Neighborhood Garden. Ruby Moon • peanutparkgarden@gmail.com • 541-753-7866 Carter Rawie Neighborhood In north central Corvallis, west of Highland and north of Circle. Potlucks, seed sharing, produce swaps. Andrea Norris • AndreaLNorris@gmail.com Seavy Community Network In northeast Corvallis, in the vicinity of Seavy Ave. Potlucks, sharing and support (skills, tools, seeds, knowledge, and bartering). Dana Allen • rebelfarms@peak.org SHARE (Southtown Harvest And Resource Exchange) In south Corvallis, east of 99W. Networking and action projects (bulk orders, cooperative gardens) focused on food production and distribution. Monthly potlucks. Weekly produce exchanges in the summer. www.groups.google.com/group/corvallis-share-?hl=en Christine Robins • 541-738-2610 Tunison Neighborhood In southwest Corvallis, west of Hwy. 99. Seed, garden and food preservation tool and skill-sharing. Rebecka Weinsteiger • 541-231-1907 West Corvallis In and around the College Hill section of Corvallis. Potlucks, canning parties, tool and information sharing. James Feldmann • 541-908-6420 8 Growing Together If you don’t have land of your own, you can participate in a community garden. Some provide individual plots for members. In others, all participants work cooperatively in a single large garden. Some organizations sponsor gardens for their own members. You can also arrange with neighbors to grow crops on their land, or to join them in working in their gardens. COMMUNITY GARDENS WITH INDIVIDUAL PLOTS Acorn Outreach Garden 1740 NW Division St. Ellen Ogle • 541-760-1535 Avery Park Community Garden City-owned. Managed by Corvallis Environmental Center. Plots are usually available. Small fee and deposit. Corvallis Environmental Center • 541-753-9211 Calvin Presbyterian Church Community Garden 1736 NW Dixon St. 541-757-8021 Dunawi Creek Community Garden In Starker Arts Park, SW 45th Pl. at Country Club Dr. City-owned. Managed by Corvallis Environmental Center. Small fee and deposit. Has handicappedaccessible plots. Corvallis Environmental Center • 541-753-9211 Sunrise Corner Community Garden 1165 SE Alexander Ave. A small, privately-owned community garden. “Fee” is labor rather than money. Christine Robins • 541-738-2610 Leonard Street Community Garden Plots available for low-income residents in the Tunison Neighborhood. Jessica Hiddleson • Jessica.Hiddleson@w-nhs.org • 541-752-7220 ext. 306...

S&S Teardrop Air Cleaner Kit for Kawasaki Vulcan 900! - S&S Cycle

FOR Kawasaki® Vulcan® 900 Honda® Fury® & VTX® 1800 Victory® Freedom® S&S Cycle has been making American v-twins go faster for over 50 years. Now we are offering some new high-performance products for metric v-twins that deliver the same kind of performance improvement as our products for their American counterparts. This S&S teardrop air cleaner kit for Kawasaki Vulcan 900 models is not just for show. Despite the good looks and the classic styling of the chrome plated S&S teardrop cover, this thing works. Improved air-flow equates to more power. Of course a set of performance exhaust and tuning will complete the package and result in more power than the air cleaner alone. Our tests show an increase of about three horsepower by installing the S&S air cleaner kit on an otherwise stock bike, but the addition of a set of Hardkrome Stripper Straights performance pipes and tuning with an aftermarket EFI tuning module resulted in over 6 additional horsepower. This dyno chart shows that the S&S air cleaner for Kawasaki® Vulcan® 900 is an effective and economical way to increase horsepower. Almost 4 horsepower were gained with the air cleaner alone, but the addition of an aftermarket fuel injection tuner delivered an increase of over 6 horsepower. That’s an increase of 13 percent! If it weren’t for the performance increases, the classic good looks of the S&S teardrop air cleaner would make it worth installing. The good news is–you get both! Getting more power out of an engine boils down to getting more air into it. One of the simplest and most cost effective ways to do that is to install a low restriction, high performance air cleaner. In this case it’s also one of the coolest looking ways to do it. The S&S teardrop air cleaner kit features the classic cool of the traditional S&S teardrop shaped cover, and the performance increase that has come to be associated with it. Installing the air cleaner alone will produce a couple of extra horsepower and does not require EFI tuning. However, an air cleaner/exhaust combination will provide significant performance improvements. To maximize performance we recommend tuning with a Power Commander® module. The dyno shows a significant increase in both horsepower and torque when the S&S air cleaner for Honda® Fury® is combined with a set of performance pipes and tuned with a Power Commander® module. The lowest curves (black) show a stock Fury as a baseline. The middle curves (blue) show the Fuggin Viper 2 system, and the top (red) curves show Cobra® pipes with the baffles removed. That’s up to a 14% increase in horsepower without opening the motor. S&S® Teardrop Air Cleaner Kit for Honda® VTX® 1800! The S&S teardrop air cleaner kit for 2002-‘08 Honda® VTX® 1800 models not only comes through with classic good looks, but provides an easy horsepower gain as well. The dyno shows a gain of over two peak horsepower and about 1 ft/lb of torque with addition of the air cleaner alone. The air cleaner with of a set of performance exhaust pipes and an aftermarket EFI tuning module showed an increase of over 6 peak horsepower and over 10 ft/lb of torque...

DC Power Supplies - Bogen Communications

DC Power Supplies Description Bogenʼs DC Power Supplies are designed to supply power to battery-operated, other low-voltage DC equipment, or 24V DC equipment from a 120V AC source. They are rugged, versatile, and dependable, making them suitable for many types of telephone paging equipment, amplified speakers and horns, tone generators, and intercom systems. 12V, 24V, and 48V models available. PRSLSI additionally provides talk battery for loop start trunks and a buffered audio output to drive up to 25 self-amplified speaker inputs. ** Center connection is positive. O.D. is 5.5 mm, I.D. is 2.1 mm ‡ Includes talk battery for loop start trunks and a buffered audio output to drive up to 25 self-amplified speaker inputs. The power supply shall be a Bogen Model PCMPS2, or approved equivalent, and shall supply unregulated 12V DC, 1.5A from a 120V AC, 60 Hz source. Maximum power consumption shall be 28 watts. The unit shall measure 2-5/8" W x 3-3/8" H x 2-7/8" D and weigh 2 lb. The power supply shall be UL and C-UL listed. PRS40C The power supply shall be a Bogen Model PRS40C, or approved equivalent, and shall supply unregulated 12V DC at 300 mA from a 120V DC, 60 Hz source. Maximum power consumption shall be 8 watts. The sleeve of the mini plug (and the lead with the white tracer) shall be positive. The unit shall measure 2" W x 2-3/8" H x 1-5/8" D. The power supply shall be UL listed. PRS2403 The power supply shall be a Bogen Model PRS2403, or approved equivalent, and shall supply unregulated 24V DC at 300 mA (6 CU) from a 120V AC, 60 Hz source. The power supply shall be capable of being connected to barrel-type connectors or screw terminal connections via an included adapter. It shall be receptacle-mounted. The unit shall measure 2-1/4" W x 3-1/4" H x 2" D and weigh 1 lb. The power supply shall be UL listed. PRSLSI The loop start interface and power supply shall be a Bogen Model PRSLSI, or approved equivalent, and shall supply regulated 24V DC at 450 mA (9 CU), as well as Tip and Ring terminals with 24V talk battery for connection to a loop start trunk, and enough audio capacity to drive up to 25 self-amplified speaker inputs. Audio flow shall be one direction from loop start terminals to the buffered audio outputs...

User manual OMRON CP1E CPU UNIT SOFTWARE - MY PDF ...

You can read the recommendations in the user guide, the technical guide or the installation guide for OMRON CP1E CPU UNIT SOFTWARE. You'll find the answers to all your questions on the OMRON CP1E CPU UNIT SOFTWARE in the user manual (information, specifications, safety advice, size, accessories, etc.). Detailed instructions for use are in the User's Guide. User manual OMRON CP1E CPU UNIT SOFTWARE User guide OMRON CP1E CPU UNIT SOFTWARE Operating instructions OMRON CP1E CPU UNIT SOFTWARE Instructions for use OMRON CP1E CPU UNIT SOFTWARE Instruction manual OMRON CP1E CPU UNIT SOFTWARE W480) (This Manual) Section Section 1 Overview Section 2 CPU Unit Memory Section 3 CPU Unit Operation Section 4 Programming Concepts Section 5 I/O Memory Section 6 I/O Allocation Section 7 PLC Setup Section 8 Overview and Allocation of Built-in Functions Section 9 Quick-response Inputs Section 10 Interrupts Section 11 High-speed Counters Section 12 Pulse Outputs Section 13 PWM Outputs Section 14 Serial Communications Contents This section gives an overview of the CP1E, describes its application procedures. This section describes the types of internal memory in a CP1E CPU Unit and the data that is stored. This section describes the operation of a CP1E CPU Unit. This section provides basic information on designing ladder programs for a CP1E CPU Unit. This section describes the types of I/O memory areas in a CP1E CPU Unit and the details. This section describes I/O allocation used to exchange data between the CP1E CPU Unit and other units. This section describes the PLC Setup, which are used to perform basic settings for a CP1E CPU Unit. This section lists the built-in functions and describes the overall application flow and the allocation of the functions. This section describes the quick-response inputs that can be used to read signals that are shorter than the cycle time. This section describes the interrupts that can be used with CP1E PLCs, including input interrupts and scheduled interrupts. This section describes the high-speed counter inputs, high-speed counter interrupts, and the frequency measurement function. This section describes positioning functions such as trapezoidal control, jogging, and origin searches. This section describes the variable-duty-factor pulse (PWM) outputs. This section describes communications with Programmable Terminals (PTs) without using communications programming, no-protocol communications with general components, and connections with a ModbusRTU Easy Master, Serial PLC Link, and host computer. This section describes the built-in analog function for NA-type CPU Units. This section describes PID temperature control, clock functions, DM backup functions, security functions. This section gives an overview of the Ethernet Option Board, describes its setting methods, I/O memory allocations, troubleshooting, how to connect the CX-Programmer, and how to install an Ethernet network. This section describes basic functions of the CX-Programmer, such as using the CX-Programmer to write ladder programs to control the CP1E CPU Unit, to transfer the programs to the CP1E CPU Unit, and to debug the programs...

TravelMate 6293 Series Product End-of-Life Disassembly Guide - Acer

TravelMate 6293 Series Product End-of-Life Disassembly Guide Machine Disassembly and Replacement This chapter contains step-by-step procedures on how to disassemble the notebook computer TravelMate 6293. To disassemble the computer, you need the following tools: Wrist grounding strap and conductive mat for preventing electrostatic discharge Flat screwdriver Small Philips screwdriver Hex screwdriver Plastic flat head screwdriver Plastic tweezers NOTE: The screws for the different components vary in size. During the disassembly process, group the screws with the corresponding components to avoid mismatch when putting back the components. General Information Before You Begin Before proceeding with the disassembly procedures, make sure that you do the following: Turn off the power to the system and all peripherals. Unplug the AC adapter and all power and signal cables from the system. Remove the battery pack. Disassembly Procedure Flowchart The flowchart on the succeeding page gives you a graphic representation on the entire disassembly sequence and instructs you on the components that need to be removed during servicing. For example, if you want to remove the system board, you must first remove the keyboard, then disassemble the inside assembly frame in that order. Main unit disassembly flow chart LCM module disassembly flow chart...

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