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1999 mercury mountaineer shift solenoid diagram

VW Amarok - Body Harness.pdf - Hayman Reese

For P/No: 04998 & 04999 only. 1. In the engine bay, disconnect the negative and positive battery terminals. 2. Remove the vehicle battery (1) by first removing any fasteners. 3. Locate the vehicle grommet behind the battery cavity area. 4. Pierce a hole in the vehicle grommet. Note: Do not connect the harness to the battery at this point. Issue Date 27-09-10 For P/No: 04997 only. 5. In the engine bay, locate the vehicle battery (1). 6. Route the body harness (2) down through to the chassis. Note: Do not connect the harness to the battery at this point. 7. Route the power input harness (1) from the engine bay down through to the chassis, following the path of the brake and fuel lines. For P/No: 04997 & 04999 only. 8. Following the diagram on the right, house the two power & ground input harness female terminals (4) into the mating connector (3). 9. Connect the power input harness connector (3) to the body harness mating connector. Issue Date 27-09-10 For P/No: 04998 only. 10. Following the diagram on the right, house the three power & ground input harness female terminals (4) into the mating connector (5). 11. Connect the power input harness connector (5) to the body harness mating connector. 12. Route the body harness (1) along the LHS chassis rail, following the path of the blue vehicle harness towards the rear of the vehicle. 13. Route the body harness (1) along the rear of the vehicle towbar towards the towbar mounting bracket. Issue Date 27-09-10

HYDRAULIC TROLLEY JACK - edoqs.org
by Dockyard 0 Comments favorite 2 Viewed Download 0 Times

Thank you for purchasing this Clarke Trolley Jack. Before attempting to use the unit, please read this instruction booklet thoroughly, and follow all directions carefully, paying particular attention to the safety precautions. By doing so, you will ensure the safe operation of the unit, and the safety of yourself and others around you. You can then look forward to long and reliable service from your CLARKE Trolley Jack. This CLARKE product is guaranteed against faulty manufacture for a period of 12 months from the date of purchase. Please keep your receipt which will be required as proof of purchase. This guarantee is invalid if the product is found to have been abused in any way, or not used for the purpose for which it was intended. Faulty goods should be returned to their place of purchase, No product can be returned to us without prior permission. This guarantee does not effect your statutory rights. 1. This jack is for lifting ONLY..DO NOT move a load using the jack as a dolly 2. Always inspect the jack before use. Ensure that all parts are in good condition and operating smoothly, the wheels are sound and that no cracks or distortion is apparent. If in doubt do not use. Have the parts replaced or consult your CLARKE dealer. 3. Ensure jack is on a firm solid base, and there is no possibility of it slipping when under load. 4. Ensure the load is taken by the FULL saddle and that the point of lift on the load, is of sufficient strength to support the full load adequately. 5. Always ensure that the load is stabilised or supported in such a way that it will not shift during lifting or lowering operations. 6. Always use supports to stabilise the load once lifted. NEVER work on or under a load unless it is fully and adequately supported. NEVER rely upon the jack to hold the load in position. 7. Never push a load off the jack. 8. Ensure that all personnel are well clear of a load being raised, or lowered. 9. NEVER exceed the rated load for the jack (see ‘Specifications’). 10. Do not use if an oil leak is apparent...Consult your Clarke dealer.

Trolley Jacks - Supplier Guide - ACCC

Australian Competition and Consumer Commission 23 Marcus Clarke Street, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, 2601 © Commonwealth of Australia 2013 This work is copyright. In addition to any use permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, all material contained within this work is provided under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia licence, with the exception of: • the Commonwealth Coat of Arms • the ACCC and AER logos • any illustration, diagram, photograph or graphic over which the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission does not hold copyright, but which may be part of or contained within this publication. The details of the relevant license conditions are available on the Creative Commons website, as is the full legal code for the CC BY 3.0 AU licence. Requests and inquiries concerning reproduction and rights should be addressed to the Director, Internal Communication and Publishing Services, ACCC, GPO Box 3131, Canberra ACT 2601, or publishing.unit@accc.gov.au. Important notice The information in this publication is for general guidance only. It does not constitute legal or other professional advice, and should not be relied on as a statement of the law in any jurisdiction. Because it is intended only as a general guide, it may contain generalisations.

Steering, Suspension, and Driveline Basics (with How Lift ... - Meetup

Throughout this article I will address many basics of your vehicle’s steering, suspension, driveline, tires, and wheels. I did not intend this to be a “how to” manual with step by step instructions. It will simply illustrate the concepts. I’ll start with the lift and explain what it did to your steering, suspension, and driveline one aspect at a time. NOTES ABOUT THE ILLUSTRATIONS: 1) most are “spring under” leaf spring suspension, 2) non-pertinent parts are omitted for clarity, 3) many examples are exaggerated for illustration, and 4) most concepts illustrated also apply to spring over and coil/link suspensions. To cover the differences, I added a separate coil and link suspensions topic. Ready? OK, let’s get started. You lifted your Jeep and now it wanders all over the road and it vibrates too. What happened? Well, you just changed a lot of the vehicle’s geometry (probably without knowing it). Here’s a diagram of a stock Jeep and the proper angles. Your caster angle should be between 4 and 8 degrees positive. This caster angle creates an effect called mechanical trail. It’s the force that makes your wheels return to center. The caster angle shown below is close to stock. The point that the steering axis (black line) intersects the ground to the point to where the rotational axis touches the ground forms the points to measure your caster angle. You can best measure the caster angle from the top of the upper ball joint.

1 TON FOLDING ENGINE STAND - Harbor Freight Tools

1 TON FOLDING ENGINE STAND Model 47304 ASSEMBLY AND OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS ® 3491 Mission Oaks Blvd., Camarillo, CA 93011 Visit our Web site at http://www.harborfreight.com Copyright © 2002 by Harbor Freight Tools®. All rights reserved. No portion of this manual or any artwork contained herein may be reproduced in any shape or form without the express written consent of Harbor Freight Tools . For technical questions and replacement parts, please call 1-800-444-3353 Specifications Engine Stand Capacity Assembled Dimensions Folded Dimensions Engine Turn Capacity Main Post Height 1 Ton (2000 Lbs.) 42” L x 36” W x 34” H 17” L x 22-1/2” W x 40” H 360 Degrees 32-1/2” Save This Manual You will need the manual for the safety warnings and precautions, assembly instructions, operating and maintenance procedures, parts list and diagram. Keep your invoice with this manual. Write the invoice number on the inside of the front cover. Keep the manual and invoice in a safe and dry place for future reference. Safety Warnings and Precautions WARNING: When using product, basic safety precautions should always be followed to reduce the risk of personal injury and damage to equipment. Read all instructions before using this product! 1. Avoid working alone. If an accident happens, an assistant can bring help. 2. Keep work area clean. Cluttered areas invite injuries. 3. Observe work area conditions. Don’t expose to rain. Keep work area well lighted. 4. Keep children away. Children must never be allowed in the work area. Do not let them near the Stand. 5. Store idle equipment. When not in use, the Stand must be stored in a dry location to inhibit rust. Always lock up tools and keep out of reach of children. 6. Dress properly. Do not wear loose clothing or jewelry as they can be caught in moving parts. Protective, electrically nonconductive clothes and nonskid footwear are recommended when working. Wear restrictive hair covering to contain long hair. 7. Use eye and ear protection. Always wear ANSI approved impact safety goggles. 8. Do not overreach. Keep proper footing and balance at all times. Do not reach over or across electrical cables or frames. 9. Maintain Stand with care. Inspect Stand, and if damaged, have it repaired by an authorized technician. SKU 47304

Isaiah check valves
by pneumax 0 Comments favorite 5 Viewed Download 0 Times

http://www.pneumax.co.za/home/products?page=shop.browse&category_id=13 | Isaiah pneumatic valves are of high quality. They’re used to manage the direction of the airflow in machinery. They also control the level of output pressure. Pneumax is South Africa’s leading supplier of pneumatic valves, solenoid valves and rodless cylinders. They supply all three models of the Isaiah check valves.

Printable (PDF) version - Innovate Motorsports

www.tuneyourengine.com. 1994 - 1997 Mitsubishi 3000GT VR4 ECU Diagram. Connector A. Connector B Connector C. Connector D. Pin #. Name. Signal Type. Connector B Name Injector 1 Injector 3 Injector 5 Injector 2 Injector 4 Injector 6 Power Ground Air Intake Temperature Sensor O2 Sensor # 1 (Right Bank) O2 Sensor # 2 (Left Bank) Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor Throttle Position Sensor Atmospheric Pressure Sensor Vehicle Speed Sensor Volume Air Flow Sensor Power Ground Sensor Ground Connector C Connector D Signal Type Speed Speed Speed Speed Speed Speed Ground Analog Analog Analog Analog Analog Analog Speed Analog Ground GroundConnector B Name Injector 1 Injector 3 Injector 5 Injector 2 Injector 4 Injector 6 Power Ground Air Intake Temperature Sensor O2 Sensor # 1 (Right Bank) O2 Sensor # 2 (Left Bank) Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor Throttle Position Sensor Atmospheric Pressure Sensor Vehicle Speed Sensor Volume Air Flow Sensor Power Ground Sensor Ground Connector C Connector D Signal Type Speed Speed Speed Speed Speed Speed Ground Analog Analog Analog Analog Analog Analog Speed Analog Ground GroundConnector B Name Injector 1 Injector 3 Injector 5 Injector 2 Injector 4 Injector 6 Power Ground Air Intake Temperature Sensor O2 Sensor # 1 (Right Bank) O2 Sensor # 2 (Left Bank) Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor Throttle Position Sensor Atmospheric Pressure Sensor Vehicle Speed Sensor Volume Air Flow Sensor Power Ground Sensor Ground Connector C Connector D Signal Type Speed Speed Speed Speed Speed Speed Ground Analog Analog Analog Analog Analog Analog Speed Analog Ground Ground

Stability of fluid flow in a flexible tube to non-axisymmetric ...

Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India (Received 17 June 1998 and in revised form 25 October 1999) The stability of fluid flow in a flexible tube to non-axisymmetric perturbations is analysed in this paper. In the first part of the paper, the equivalents of classical theorems of hydrodynamic stability are derived for inviscid flow in a flexible tube subjected to arbitrary non-axisymmetric disturbances. Perturbations of the form vi = ˜i exp [ik(x − ct) + inθ] are imposed on a steady axisymmetric mean flow U(r) in v a flexible tube, and the stability of mean flow velocity profiles and bounds for the phase velocity of the unstable modes are determined for arbitrary values of azimuthal wavenumber n. Here r, θ and x are respectively the radial, azimuthal and axial coordinates, and k and c are the axial wavenumber and phase velocity of disturbances. The flexible wall is represented by a standard constitutive relation which contains inertial, elastic and dissipative terms. The general results indicate that the fluid flow in a flexible tube is stable in the inviscid limit if the quantity UdG/dr > 0, and could be unstable for UdG/dr < 0, where G ≡ rU /(n2 + k 2 r2 ). For the case of Hagen–Poiseuille flow, the general result implies that the flow is stable to axisymmetric disturbances (n = 0), but could be unstable to non-axisymmetric disturbances with any non-zero azimuthal wavenumber (n = 0). This is in marked contrast to plane parallel flows where two-dimensional disturbances are always more unstable than three-dimensional ones (Squire theorem).

Sample Teen Resume
by Deppony 0 Comments favorite 6 Viewed Download 0 Times

Seeking part-time retail sales clerk/cashier position SUMMARY OF QUALIFICATIONS • • • • • Customer-focused self-starter with proven client services skills Energetic, hard-working achiever and communicator, with strong listening skills Quick learner, eager to learn and follow directions Excellent team player who thrives in teamwork situations Responsible and reliable, with record of professionalism EDUCATION • High School Diploma, Kettle Falls High School, Kettle Falls, WA, expected May 2012 HONORS AND DISTINCTIONS • • • Earned Stevens County Superintendent’s Scholar Award, 2011 Achieved Honor Roll, Kettle Falls High, 2010-2011 Earned Varsity Letter, Kettle Falls High Soccer Team, 2009-2011 WORK HISTORY Bagger, Super One Foods, Colville, WA, Summer 2010 • Prepared bagged groceries to customer specifications • Assisted in loading groceries to customer vehicles • Secured shopping carts and other key supplies • Provided customer service to average of 60 customers per shift Babysitter, Suzie’s Babysitting Services, Kettle Falls, WA, 2007 to present • Maintain satisfied clientele of 10 families • Provide quality care for children aged newborn to 12 years • Manage all aspects of business COMMUNITY SERVICE • • • • Supplied 40 community-service hours at Parkview Senior Living, retirement community, Sept. to Oct. 2010 Donated more than 100 hours to Northeast Washington Fairgrounds, Fall 2009 and Spring, 2010 Contributed more than 120 volunteer hours to Columbia River Christian Academy Summer Camp, Summer 2010 Provided 10 volunteer hours to Columbia River Cleanup, Summer 2010 SKILLS • • • Customer relations, customer service Computer literate in both Windows and Macintosh platforms Working knowledge of Spanish

Sample Alumni Resume - Yale Law School

ATTICUS FINCH Post Office Box 8994 Los Angeles, CA 90026 213-999-9999 atticus94@aya.yale.edu EDUCATION YALE LAW SCHOOL, J.D., 2000 • Yale Law Journal • Director, Disability Clinic • Coker Teaching Fellow, Contracts I, Professor Reva Siegel • Research Assistant, Professor Jerry Mashaw HARVARD UNIVERSITY, A.B., 1995 • summa cum laude, English and American Literature/Philosophy • Phi Beta Kappa • Supervisor, University Lutheran Homeless Shelter EXPERIENCE ACLU FOUNDATION OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, CA, 1997 - present Staff Attorney (2002 - present); George Slaff First Amendment Fellow (2001 - 02) Litigate civil rights and civil liberties cases in the areas of free speech, race and gender equity, voting rights, disability rights, police practices, poverty and welfare, immigrants' rights, employment, and open government. Successfully challenged restrictions on political protests. Coauthored brief to United States Supreme Court. Argued open meeting act case before California Supreme Court. COMMON CAUSE, Washington, DC, 2004 - present Chair, Board of Directors, and National Governing Board Supervise activities of Common Cause at state and national levels, including advocacy on campaign finance reform, open government, ethics, public accountability, and civil rights issues. Chair state board meetings. JUDGE STEPHEN REINHARDT, NINTH CIRCUIT COURT OF APPEALS, Los Angeles, CA, 2000-2001 NAACP LEGAL DEFENSE & EDUCATIONAL FUND, Washington, DC, Summer 1999 Researched and wrote memoranda and briefs on educational equity, school desegregation, employment discrimination, and fair housing issues. GREATER BOSTON LEGAL SERVICES, Boston, MA, 1995-97 Represented people with mental and physical disabilities seeking Social Security benefits. Gathered evidence, wrote legal briefs, and represented clients at administrative hearings. BAR ADMISSIONS Admitted to state and federal courts in California and Massachusetts.

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