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1995 ford explorer 4x4 transmission speed sensor location

JANE WILLIAMS - Rhode Island College
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JANE WILLIAMS, PhD, RN Dean and Professor of Nursing School of Nursing, Rhode Island College 600 Mt. Pleasant Avenue, Providence, RI 02908 TEL: 401 456-9608: FAX: 401 456-8206 Email: jwilliams@ric.edu CURRENT EMPLOYMENT Rhode Island College, Dean and Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, 1975-present; initial appointment as assistant professor, 1975; appointed Professor, 1995, Department Chairperson, 2000, and Dean, 2007. EDUCATION University of Rhode Island, College of Nursing, Kingston, Rhode Island, Ph.D., Nursing, 1995. New York University, School of Education, New York, New York, M.A., Major in Education and Minor in Nursing, 1968; University of Michigan, School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, Michigan, B.S.N. with Distinction, 1966. PUBLICATIONS Williams, J., Brumbaugh, M. & Vares, L., (2006), “Education to improve interdisciplinary practice of health care professionals: A pilot project”, Medicine & Health, Rhode Island, 89 (9), p. 312-313. Mosser, N., Williams, J. & Wood, C. (2006), “The use of progression testing throughout nursing programs: How two colleges promote success on NCLEX-RN”. Annual Review of Nursing Education. Vol.4, p. 305-319. Newman, M. and Williams, J. (2003) "Educating Nurses in Rhode Island: A lot of diversity in a little place", Journal of Cultural Diversity, Vol. 10, No. 3, p. 91-95. Williams, J., (2001) “The Clinical Notebook: Using Student Portfolios to Enhance Teaching and Learning, Journal of Nursing Education. Vol. 40, p. 135-137. Ferszt, G., Massotti, E., Miller, J. & Williams, J. (2000) “Art on Rounds: Research Study of an in-patient oncology unit”, Illness Crisis and Loss. Vol. 8, No. 2, pp. 189-199. Williams, J. (1999) “When Interns Meet Managed Care” [Letter to the Editor]. New York Times, p. 30A. Williams, J., Wood, C., & Cunningham-Warburton, P. (1999) “A Narrative Study of Chemotherapy-Induced Alopecia”. Oncology Nursing Forum. Vol. 26, pp. 1463-1468. Willliams, J. (1999) “Health Policy Tool Kit Helps Students to Get Involved”. ONS Newsletter, 14 (9) p 5.

Brake Booster Market - Freescale Semiconductor

PERFOMANCE BOOST The Freescale* MPXV4115V pressure sensor is the ideal part for automotive vacuum sensing needs such as those found in the brake booster application. Prepared by Marc Osajda Automotive Sensor Marketing Motorola – Toulouse, France Advanced braking systems are becoming increasingly common in today’s automobiles. Higher level systems and technology now being used in “brake assist systems” (BAS) in several European cars, have made it possible for more efficient and intelligent braking systems. A key functional application block found in these braking systems that has advanced with this technology surge, is the vacuum brake booster function. Here are a few driving factors behind the need and use of the brake booster, which helps ensure a safer braking system. Independent Systems: In current gasoline engine cars, the engine’s intake manifold generates the vacuum for the brake booster. This system works fine with one exception. The amount of vacuum in the brake booster is unknown by the braking system. Thus the amount of amplification is also unknown. If heavy braking is needed, there is no possibility for the brake system to interact with the intake manifold if additional amplification is required. The manufacturer’s interest for having the vacuum generated by an auxiliary vacuum pump is that the brake system can manage the amount of vacuum as required, on demand. This in turns gives it the ability to perform amplification on its own, giving it complete independent from the engine’s operating condition. The auxiliary pump is also able to provide higher amounts of vacuum whenever necessary. In situations calling for heavy braking, the pressure will naturally decrease in the brake booster, also causing a decrease in the amplification during braking. With an external pump it is possible to maintain, or even increase the amplification during a heavy braking phase. Smart Safety: Wheel blocking due to high-braking force is controlled by the Anti-Lock Brake System (ABS). However, it has been observed that in many cases, drivers do not...

Safety Recall No. 983 Brake Booster Vacuum Hose

Safety Recall No. 983 Brake Booster Vacuum Hose Models 2000-2001 (PL) Dodge and Plymouth Neon NOTE: This recall applies only to the above vehicles equipped with a: Ø 2.0L engine (“C” in the 8th VIN Position) built through March 21, 2001 (MDH 0321XX) or a Ø 2.0L High Output engine (“F” in the 8th VIN Position) built through April 11, 2001 (MDH 0411XX). IMPORTANT: Some of the involved vehicles may be in dealer new vehicle inventory. Federal law requires you to stop sale and complete this recall service on these vehicles before retail delivery. Dealers should also consider this requirement to apply to used vehicle inventory and should perform this recall on vehicles in for service. Involved vehicles can be determined by using the DIAL VIP System. Subject The brake booster vacuum hose on about 350,000 of the above vehicles may swell due to oil contamination and become disconnected. A disconnected hose could cause a loss of power brake assist and an increase in engine idle speed. This can increase stopping distance and cause an accident without warning. Repair The brake booster vacuum hose must be replaced. © Copyright 2001, DaimlerChrysler Corporation, All Rights Reserved Safety Recall No. 983 -- Brake Booster Vacuum Hose Page 2 Parts Information Each dealer to whom vehicles in the recall were invoiced (or the current dealer at the same street address) will receive enough Brake Booster Vacuum Hoses to service about 10% of those vehicles. Dealers should determine which brake booster vacuum hose is required for each vehicle at the time appointments are scheduled to assure that the correct part is available when the customer arrives. The vacuum hose for the vehicle to be serviced may be determined by: Ø Using the part code in the third column of the VIN list along with the following table (involved dealers); Ø Using the VIN and part number list electronically transmitted to DIAL System Function 53 (involved dealers); or...

Introduction to Brake Systems – Study Guide

Introduction Everybody knows that when you press your foot on the brake pedal the vehicle is supposed to stop. But how does the pressure from your foot get to the wheels with enough force to stop a heavy vehicle? In the following sections, we will study the systems and components required to allow brakes to work effectively. Course Objectives Upon completion of this course, technicians should understand and be able to apply their knowledge of: • • • • • • • • • • • • Brake functions and components Split hydraulic systems Master cylinder operations Balance control systems Power brake booster systems Disc brake operation Micrometer reading Drum brake operation Brake fluids Brake bleeding operations Brake lines and hoses Basic diagnosis Using the Job Sheets As you proceed through the online module, on some pages you will find links that will open a window with a printable procedure or job sheet containing hands-on lab activities based on the NATEF standards related to the content you are studying. When you come upon a procedure or job sheet link, click on it and print the job sheet for completion in the shop. See your instructor for guidance in completing the job sheets. Some jobs sheets will require supplemental materials such as a vehicle service manual, equipment manual, or other references. Brake System Functions Automotive brakes are designed to slow and stop a vehicle by transforming kinetic (motion) energy into heat energy. As the brake linings contact the drums/rotors they create friction which produces the heat energy. The intensity of the heat is proportional to the vehicle speed, the weight of the vehicle, and the quickness of the stop. Faster speeds, heavier vehicles, and quicker stops equal more heat. Automotive brake systems can be broken down into several different sub-systems (fig. 1): • Apply system • Boost system • Hydraulic system • Wheel brakes • Balance control system • Warning system (fig. 1) Base Brake Systems .

HYDRAULICS & BRAKE BOOSTER CATALOG - Aisin

The clutch master cylinder is a device that transforms mechanical force into hydraulic pressure. As the driver presses the clutch pedal, the pedal lever applies force to the clutch master cylinder which transmits hydraulic pressure to the clutch release (slave) cylinder that disconnects engine power to the transmission. Structure and Components [Conventional Type] Inlet Union Oil Spill Hole Aluminum Body Flare Nut Pipe Joint Boot Spring Primary Cup Resin Piston Push Rod Rel Secondary Cup Spring Metallic Clevis Damper Stud Bolt The clutch master cylinder structure consists of the piston, cups, and springs, built within a precision machined body. The primary cup, positioned on the leading side of the body, functions to create hydraulic pressure when fluid is forced inside by the piston. Located on the trailing side is the secondary cup, which guides the piston and prevents fluid from leaking. When the clutch pedal is pressed, the primary cup is blocked away by the piston from the oil spill port leading to the reservoir tank, pressure in the cylinder rises as the fluid is fed through the pipeline. When the clutch pedal is released, the hydraulic pressure and the force of the return spring pulls back the piston to relieve fluid back into the reservoir. The clutch master cylinder is what provides the necessary force to control the application of drivetrain power. 2 Clutch Master Cylinder Variations Clutch Master Cylinder Variations Conventional Port-less Type Stand Alone / Integrated Reservoir Type Types With and Without Stud Bolts Types With and Without Clevis Damper Types With and Without Clutch Booster ...

Your Webinar Will Begin Shortly - Motor Coach Industries

Welcome to the MCILEARN Series Your Webinar Will Begin Shortly Today’s Topic Shake Out: Vibration Analysis If you do not have an audio connection, dial 877-739-5904 and enter the Audio PIN number given to you on your screen © 2012 Motor Coach Industries Int'l, Inc. and its subsidiaries. All Rights Reserved. Learning Objectives • Identify the different classifications of vehicle driveline vibrations • Begin to diagnose & locate the source of a vehicle driveline vibration • Provide a correction to eliminate the vibration from the vehicle © 2012 Motor Coach Industries Int'l, Inc. and its subsidiaries. All Rights Reserved. Safety Message • Always use personal protection devices – Safety glasses, ear protection, etc • Always observe all safety precautions listed in the Maintenance Manual including but not limited to: – – – – – – Ensure coach is on a level surface Ensure parking brake is applied Chock wheels Always use jack stands Shut off batteries Utilize Lock Out/Tag Out procedures © 2012 Motor Coach Industries Int'l, Inc. and its subsidiaries. All Rights Reserved. Vibration Identification: Identifying the Source of a Vibration © 2012 Motor Coach Industries Int'l, Inc. and its subsidiaries. All Rights Reserved. Vibration Analysis Primary sources of vibrations • Tires & Wheels – Rims, tires, hub & drum assemblies • Driveline – Driveshaft & slip-joint, u-joints, yokes & flanges – Working angle of driveshaft • Engine & Transmission – Crankshaft, injectors & cylinders, vibration dampers, engine supports, exhaust...

SECTION 205-00 Driveline System — General Information

GENERAL PROCEDURES Driveshaft Runout and Balancing Special Tool(s) Dial Indicator Gauge with Holding Fixture 100-002 (TOOL-4201-C) or equivalent Mastertech® Series MTS 4000 Driveline Balance and NVH Analyzer (Vetronix) 257-00018 or equivalent Driveshaft Inspection NOTE: Driveline vibration exhibits a higher frequency and lower amplitude than high-speed shake. Driveline vibration is directly related to the speed of the vehicle and is noticed at various speeds. Driveline vibration can be perceived as a tremor in the floorpan or heard as a rumble, hum or boom. NOTE: Refer to Specifications in this section for all runout specifications. 1. NOTE: Do not make any adjustments before carrying out a road test. Do not change the tire pressure or the vehicle load. Carry out a visual inspection of the vehicle. Operate the vehicle and verify the condition by reproducing it during the road test. • 2. With the vehicle in NEUTRAL, position it on a hoist. For additional information, refer to Section 100-02. • 3. The concern should be directly related to vehicle road speed, not affected by acceleration or deceleration or could not be reduced by coasting in NEUTRAL. The driveshaft should be kept at an angle equal to or close to the curb-weighted position. Use a twin-post hoist or a frame hoist with jackstands. Inspect the driveshaft for damage, undercoating or incorrectly seated U-joints. Rotate the driveshaft slowly by hand and feel for binding or end play in the U-joint trunnions. Remove the driveshaft. For additional information, refer to Section 205-01. Inspect the slip yoke splines for any galling, dirt, rust or incorrect lubrication. Clean the driveshaft or install new U-joints as necessary. Install a new driveshaft if damaged. After any corrections or new components are installed, recheck for the vibration at the road test speed.

Propeller drive systems and torsional vibration - The Bugatti 100p ...

Written by Donald P. Hessenaur As aircraft engine prices continue to rise beyond the reach of most who would like to build and fly their own aircraft, many are turning to alternate power sources. This is not a new phenomenon. From the Wright brothers on, many have designed, built or converted engines to aircraft use. At one time or another engines have been used from automobiles, motorcycles, outboard motors and even snowmobiles, with varying degrees of success or failure. AUTO ENGINE CONVERSIONS Today many automotive engine conversions are appearing on the aviation scene. They are definitely a viable alternative. The automotive engine today is very advanced technically and relatively low in cost when compared to Lycomings and/or Continentals. Unfortunately, automotive engines are designed and optimized for the automobile and not for aircraft. Generally auto engines operate at a much higher RPM. The torsional vibration characteristics of a given engine, connected to a transmission, drive train and wheels, are quite different from that of the same engine, connected to an aircraft propeller. The damping action of the tires on the road and the inertia effects of the mass of the automobile are not even close to the damping/inertia effects of a propeller turning in air.

Eaton's Driveline Angle Analyzer Tool Kit (DAA 2) - Truck Vibration ...

Eaton’s Driveline Angle Analyzer Tool Kit (DAA 2) Helps Eliminate Torsional Vibration Problems The tool kit diagnoses the driveline angles that cause torsional vibrations between the transmission and front and rear drive axles. Varying ride heights, angles and configurations can create torsional vibrations throughout the drivetrain, which in turn can cause noise complaints and vibrations that result in significantly reduced drivetrain component life. Frequently, vehicles are sensitive to small changes in driveline angles, making it virtually impossible even for a seasoned technician to visually inspect a driveline and see whether its component angles are going to lead to problems down the road. Eaton’s Driveline Angle Analyzer allows you to properly measure driveline angles and diagnose potential problems before serious damage to the equipment occurs. The analyzer also identifies corrections for optimum component life.

Drive Line / Universal
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– Drivelines and Universal Joints Universal Joint Maintenance • Most factory-installed universal joints are sealed and don’t require periodic lubrication • After-market replacement joints are equipped with a grease fitting and must be greased periodically Drive Shaft Problem Diagnosis • Road testing – Vehicle should be driven while accelerating and decelerating as well as at various steady speeds – Vibrations caused by worn U-joints usually occur while accelerating Types and Causes of Vibrations • High speed vibrations – Usually caused by driveshaft imbalance • Vibrations during acceleration – Usually caused by worn double Cardan joint ball and socket • Low speed vibrations – Usually caused by improper operating angles Noise Diagnosis • Clunking noise while accelerating from a dead stop – Usually caused by worn or damaged U-joint – Can be caused by problems including excessive clearance between slip joint and extension housing • Squeaking noise – Often caused by worn or poorly lubricated U-joint Reasons for Universal Joint Failure • Lack of lubrication • Pushing another car • Towing a trailer • Changing gears abruptly • Carrying heavy loads Steps in Lubricating U-Joints 1. Wipe off the nozzle of the fitting 2. Attach the hose of the grease gun to the fitting 3. Pump grease slowly into the fitting 4. Stop pumping when grease appears at the bearing cups Inspecting the Drive Shaft • Check for fluid leaks • Check the U-joints for signs of rust or leakage • Check for movement in the joint while trying to turn the yoke and the shaft in opposite directions • Check the drive shaft for dents, missing weights, and undercoating or dirt...

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